New Enactor Turing Fellowship established

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Alan Turing (KC 1931)

A generous donation from e-commerce platform provider Enactor will support the creation of a new Turing Fellowship at King's. The gift will enable the inauguration of the Enactor College Teaching Officer role, a full-time teaching post in Computer Science for five years starting in the 2022/23 academic year.

Announced on the day of Alan Turing's birth, the new Fellowship adds to the support being given towards the Enactor Alan Turing PhD Studentships, a cornerstone of The Alan Turing Programme at King's. The Programme is designed to build on Turing's legacy and bring together some of the most talented research fellows and graduate students from across data and computer science to biotechnology, maths and mathematical biology, as well as the politics of sexuality and gender.


About Alan Turing

Alan Turing read mathematics at King’s from 1931 to 1934, gaining his degree with first-class honours. Shortly after graduating, on the strength of his mathematical dissertation, he was elected a Fellow of the College. In 1936 while at Cambridge Turing published his seminal paper 'On Computable Numbers', which introduced the key concepts of algorithms and computing machines, and gave birth to the idea of a computer.
 

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