Junior Research Fellowships 2019

Stipendiary Junior Research Fellowships 2019 – 2023

Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences

Junior Research Fellowships in Immateriality and in Representation:

Junior Research Fellowship in Immateriality

King’s College Cambridge invites applications for a four-year Junior Research Fellowship from those who are completing or have recently completed a doctorate and who intend to pursue a research project on some aspect of the study of immateriality.

Materialism has long been an important theme in both historical studies (Marx etc.) and in philosophy. In the last few years the theme of materiality, the way the physical properties of an object have cultural consequences, has inspired a vast body of research, giving rise to talk of a ‘material turn’ in literary and historical studies. But even properly to understand the role of material, we badly need to explore materiality’s converse, immateriality. What is the immaterial, if indeed it ‘is’ anything at all? This call for applications is open to investigations of immateriality in its own right, for example as a concept in the history of philosophy; it is also open to projects concerned with the relation between the material (artefactual, biological, geological, etc.) and the immaterial.  The latter might include, for example, research on intimations of immateriality, such as hauntings or symbolism perceived in material objects; analysis of the intellectual means by which the material is ordered, such as ‘form’, ‘scheduling’, ‘discipline’ or ‘evolution’; study of the digital imagination as it relates to technological and human constraints; the building of ideology into the design of objects or infrastructure, such as ‘anti-homeless architecture’; or research on immaterial aspects of the human body in the context of biological reductionism. 

This post-doctoral Fellowship is intended to encourage such research by enabling the successful candidate to complete a substantial research project on some aspect of immateriality in the context of recent advances in any of the following range of disciplines: philosophy, history, archaeology, classics, anthropology, psychology, architecture, literature, art and music studies, psychology.

The ideal candidate for this Junior Research Fellowship will have a strong background in one or more disciplines within the Arts, Humanities, or Social Sciences and have completed an outstanding doctoral thesis. It is not a requirement that the candidate’s doctoral studies or the work that they submit in support of their application should have concerned questions of immateriality, but candidates will be expected to show in their applications both how their future work relates to the work that they have already done, and to explain clearly how their proposed project relates to existing studies on their chosen theme. The successful candidate will be expected to engage broadly with the whole college community and to organise academic activities in the form of seminars/workshops/conferences (for which the College will provide modest funding).

A Junior Research Fellowship is a postdoctoral position tenable for up to 4 years. Applications are welcome from graduates of any university. Candidates will usually have completed their PhD, and must not have undertaken more than 2 years of postdoctoral work by 1st October 2019 (i.e. your PhD cannot have been granted before 30th September 2017).

The closing date for applications is 9 a.m. on Thursday, 6th September 2018.

King’s College follows an equal opportunities policy.

FURTHER PARTICULARS

Stipendiary Junior Research Fellowship in Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences 2019–2023

Immateriality

King’s College Cambridge invites applications for a four-year Junior Research Fellowship from those who are completing or have recently completed a doctorate and who intend to pursue a research project on some aspect of the study of immateriality.


Materialism has long been an important theme in both historical studies (Marx etc.) and in philosophy. In the last few years the theme of materiality, the way the physical properties of an object have cultural consequences, has inspired a vast body of research, giving rise to talk of a ‘material turn’ in literary and historical studies. But even properly to understand the role of material, we badly need to explore materiality’s converse, immateriality. What is the immaterial, if indeed it ‘is’ anything at all? This call for applications is open to investigations of immateriality in its own right, for example as a concept in the history of philosophy; it is also open to projects concerned with the relation between the material (artefactual, biological, geological, etc.) and the immaterial.  The latter might include, for example, research on intimations of immateriality, such as hauntings or symbolism perceived in material objects; analysis of the intellectual means by which the material is ordered, such as ‘form’, ‘scheduling’, ‘discipline’ or ‘evolution’; study of the digital imagination as it relates to technological and human constraints; the building of ideology into the design of objects or infrastructure, such as ‘anti-homeless architecture’; or research on immaterial aspects of the human body in the context of biological reductionism. 

This post-doctoral Fellowship is intended to encourage such research by enabling the successful candidate to complete a substantial research project on some aspect of immateriality in the context of recent advances in any of the following range of disciplines: philosophy, history, archaeology, classics, anthropology, psychology, architecture, literature, art and music studies, psychology.

The ideal candidate for this Junior Research Fellowship will have a strong background in one or more disciplines within the Arts, Humanities, or Social Sciences and have completed an outstanding doctoral thesis. It is not a requirement that the candidate’s doctoral studies or the work that they submit in support of their application should have concerned questions of immateriality, but candidates will be expected to show in their applications both how their future work relates to the work that they have already done, and to explain clearly how their proposed project relates to existing studies on their chosen theme. The successful candidate will be expected to engage broadly with the whole college community and to organise academic activities in the form of seminars/workshops/conferences (for which the College will provide modest funding).

The Junior Research Fellows are members of the Governing Body, with full privileges of Fellows. In addition to pursuing research, a Junior Research Fellow is required to live in Cambridge or close by and to participate in College life and activity. Privileges include all meals, limited financial support for expenses associated with research, the possibility of an office and accommodation in College properties. Although these are research posts, teaching is likely to be made available if desired.

The stipend attached to all Junior Research Fellowships is £21,290 (pre award of doctorate) rising each year to a maximum of £27,401, according to age and academic qualification. Additional payment is made for teaching. A living-out allowance of £4,000 is made to those not living in college. Further information about the College may be obtained from the College website (www.kings.cam.ac.uk).

Eligibility

Graduates of any university are eligible. Candidates will usually have completed their PhD and must not have undertaken more than 2 years of postdoctoral work by 1st October 2019 (i.e. your PhD cannot have been granted before 30th September 2017).

Dates

The closing date for application is 9 am on Thursday, 6th September 2018. Applications received after this date and time will not be considered. Short-listed candidates will be invited for interview on either Wednesday, 16th January 2019 or Thursday, 17th January 2019. Please ensure that you will be available for interview on these dates, as it is not possible to arrange other times for interviews. The Fellowship will begin on 1st October 2019 and will run until 30th September 2023.

Application

To apply use the following link to go to the FAS website and create an application:

https://app.casc.cam.ac.uk/fas_live/jrfimm.aspx

Before the closing date, applicants must complete all sections of the online Fellowship Application and upload onto the website (PDF only) the following:

A curriculum vitae (of no more than four A4 sides) including details of higher education, degrees awarded, positions held and a list of publications.

A document (of no more than 1200 words in length) containing descriptions of your current research and of the research you propose to undertake during the Fellowship.

Applicants must also arrange for three letters of recommendation to be uploaded onto the site in PDF format. Each referee will be asked to provide the names of two further readers, not in the candidate’s institution, to whom work might be sent if the candidate is long-listed. It is the duty of the candidate to ensure that the referees submit the references and the names of two readers before the closing date.

Your referees will need to provide their references through the FAS website. They will be sent an email containing a link to do this. Referees unable to submit references electronically via the FAS website may e-mail to send them directly to the competition administrator.

Please note that all application materials must be in the English language.

The application will not be considered in the competition until it has been submitted and all references and the names of additional readers have been received. An email will be sent once this has occurred.

After the closing date, the College will contact selected applicants by email to ask for samples of written work, up to 20,000 words (either published papers or chapters of a doctoral thesis).

Travel expenses

A successful candidate travelling from outside the UK to take up a Fellowship may claim travel and removal expenses up to a level agreed in advance with the Bursar of the College.

Further questions

If you have any further questions regarding any aspect of the competition, please e-mail to reach the competition administrator.

King’s College follows an equal opportunities policy.

Junior Research Fellowship in Representation 2019 – 2023

King’s College Cambridge invites applications for a four-year Junior Research Fellowship from those who are completing or have recently completed a doctorate and who intend to pursue a research project on some aspect of the study of representation.

 The issue of representation is ubiquitous. It concerns how the world and all that is in it is and has been represented in art and literature; how systems of representation in politics, law, etc. do their job; how academic studies make their choices of what is representative evidence to answer their questions; whether music in any way represents the world. Whatever form of expression is chosen, whether it is by words, pictures, sounds or actions, the question of how that form of expression relates to the material about which it makes its statements is a pressing one. Yet that question is widely neglected. On what grounds does one thing or person ‘stand for’ another thing or person? Little enough concern is expressed about how members of parliament perform their role in a representative democracy, and even less about how historians represent the people of the past. Beyond formal political institutions – e.g. in context of (social) media and public discourse – who gets to speak ‘for’ whom? Within social sciences, tests for statistical significance stand in place of considerations of whether what is quantified itself adequately represents the behaviour of the group being investigated. While much discussion in the visual arts has concerned how the process of mimesis might work, very much less consideration has been given to the different ways in which different mimetic conventions represent the world differently. What might be the consequences and significance – in art, in theory, in political systems – of not being represented or of not being represented in a particular way?

It is time that what artists, writers, musicians, and scholars across the arts, humanities and social sciences are doing when they claim to represent other people and the world, was put higher on the scholarly agenda, and that what it is that links issues of historical truth and proper government, artistic mimesis and sampling of populations, is made central to discussions of theory and methodology.

This post-doctoral Fellowship is intended to place the question of representation higher on the scholarly agenda by enabling the successful candidate to complete a substantial research project on some aspect of representation. Projects may concern issues of representation as they affect work in any arts, humanities or social science discipline (including the history of science). They may be heavily theoretical or concentrate on particular case studies within individual disciplines. But they will seek to showcase representation as an issue.

The ideal candidate for this Junior Research Fellowship will have a strong background in one or more disciplines within the arts, humanities, or social sciences and have completed an outstanding doctoral thesis. It is not a requirement that the candidate’s doctoral studies or the work that they submit in support of their application should have highlighted issues of representation, but candidates will be expected to show in their applications both how their future work relates to the work that they have already done, and that they are able to situate their proposed project in relation to the issue of representation. The successful candidate will be expected to engage broadly with the whole college community and to organise academic activities in the form of seminars/workshops/conferences (for which the College will provide modest funding).

A Junior Research Fellowship is a postdoctoral position tenable for up to 4 years. Applications are welcome from graduates of any university. Candidates will usually have completed their PhD, and must not have undertaken more than 2 years of postdoctoral work by 1st October 2019 (i.e. your PhD cannot have been granted before 30th September 2017).

The closing date for applications is 9 a.m. on Thursday, 6th September 2018.

King’s College follows an equal opportunities policy.

FURTHER PARTICULARS

Stipendiary Junior Research Fellowship in Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences 2019–2023

Representation

King’s College Cambridge invites applications for a four-year Junior Research Fellowship from those who are completing or have recently completed a doctorate and who intend to pursue a research project on some aspect of the study of representation.

The issue of representation is ubiquitous. It concerns how the world and all that is in it is and has been represented in art and literature; how systems of representation in politics, law, etc. do their job; how academic studies make their choices of what is representative evidence to answer their questions; whether music in any way represents the world. Whatever form of expression is chosen, whether it is by words, pictures, sounds or actions, the question of how that form of expression relates to the material about which it makes its statements is a pressing one. Yet that question is widely neglected. On what grounds does one thing or person ‘stand for’ another thing or person? Little enough concern is expressed about how members of parliament perform their role in a representative democracy, and even less about how historians represent the people of the past. Beyond formal political institutions – e.g. in context of (social) media and public discourse – who gets to speak ‘for’ whom? Within social sciences, tests for statistical significance stand in place of considerations of whether what is quantified itself adequately represents the behaviour of the group being investigated. While much discussion in the visual arts has concerned how the process of mimesis might work, very much less consideration has been given to the different ways in which different mimetic conventions represent the world differently. What might be the consequences and significance – in art, in theory, in political systems – of not being represented or of not being represented in a particular way?

It is time that what artists, writers, musicians, and scholars across the arts, humanities and social sciences are doing when they claim to represent other people and the world, was put higher on the scholarly agenda, and that what it is that links issues of historical truth and proper government, artistic mimesis and sampling of populations, is made central to discussions of theory and methodology.

This post-doctoral Fellowship is intended to place the question of representation higher on the scholarly agenda by enabling the successful candidate to complete a substantial research project on some aspect of representation. Projects may concern issues of representation as they affect work in any arts, humanities or social science discipline (including the history of science). They may be heavily theoretical or concentrate on particular case studies within individual disciplines. But they will seek to showcase representation as an issue.

The ideal candidate for this Junior Research Fellowship will have a strong background in one or more disciplines within the arts, humanities, or social sciences and have completed an outstanding doctoral thesis. It is not a requirement that the candidate’s doctoral studies or the work that they submit in support of their application should have highlighted issues of representation, but candidates will be expected to show in their applications both how their future work relates to the work that they have already done, and that they are able to situate their proposed project in relation to the issue of representation. The successful candidate will be expected to engage broadly with the whole college community and to organise academic activities in the form of seminars/workshops/conferences (for which the College will provide modest funding).

The Junior Research Fellows are members of the Governing Body, with full privileges of Fellows. In addition to pursuing research, a Junior Research Fellow is required to live in Cambridge or close by and to participate in College life and activity. Privileges include all meals, limited financial support for expenses associated with research, the possibility of an office and accommodation in College properties. Although these are research posts, teaching is likely to be made available if desired.

The stipend attached to all Junior Research Fellowships is £21,290 (pre award of doctorate) rising each year to a maximum of £27,401, according to age and academic qualification. Additional payment is made for teaching. A living-out allowance of £4,000 is made to those not living in college. Further information about the College may be obtained from the College website (www.kings.cam.ac.uk).

Eligibility

Graduates of any university are eligible. Candidates will usually have completed their PhD and must not have undertaken more than 2 years of postdoctoral work by 1st October 2019 (i.e. your PhD cannot have been granted before 30th September 2017).

Dates

The closing date for application is 9 am on Thursday, 6th September 2018. Applications received after this date and time will not be considered. Short-listed candidates will be invited for interview on either Wednesday, 16th January 2019 or Thursday, 17th January 2019. Please ensure that you will be available for interview on these dates, as it is not possible to arrange other times for interviews. The Fellowship will begin on 1st October 2019 and will run until 30th September 2023.

Application

To apply use the following link to go to the FAS website and create an application:

https://app.casc.cam.ac.uk/fas_live/jrfrep.aspx

Before the closing date, applicants must complete all sections of the online Fellowship Application and upload onto the website (PDF only) the following:

A curriculum vitae (of no more than four A4 sides) including details of higher education, degrees awarded, positions held and a list of publications.

A document (of no more than 1200 words in length) containing descriptions of your current research and of the research you propose to undertake during the Fellowship.

Applicants must also arrange for three letters of recommendation to be uploaded onto the site in PDF format. Each referee will be asked to provide the names of two further readers, not in the candidate’s institution, to whom work might be sent if the candidate is long-listed. It is the duty of the candidate to ensure that the referees submit the references and the names of two readers before the closing date.

Your referees will need to provide their references through the FAS website. They will be sent an email containing a link to do this. Referees unable to submit references electronically via the FAS website may e-mail to send them directly to the competition administrator.

Please note that all application materials must be in the English language.

The application will not be considered in the competition until it has been submitted and all references and the names of additional readers have been received. An email will be sent once this has occurred.

After the closing date, the College will contact selected applicants by email to ask for samples of written work, up to 20,000 words (either published papers or chapters of a doctoral thesis).

Travel expenses

A successful candidate travelling from outside the UK to take up a Fellowship may claim travel and removal expenses up to a level agreed in advance with the Bursar of the College.

Further questions

If you have any further questions regarding any aspect of the competition, please e-mail to reach the competition administrator.

King’s College follows an equal opportunities policy.

Non-Stipendiary Junior Research Fellowship in Biological Sciences 2018–2022

This competition has closed.

Stipendiary Junior Research Fellowships

Each year, the college holds competitions for Stipendiary Junior Research Fellowships. These support gifted young researchers for four years; generally Junior Research Fellows are appointed within two years of the award of a doctorate.

The Fellowships give young researchers an opportunity to establish their career before moving on to become fully independent researchers. Junior Research Fellows have freedom to carry out their chosen research projects within the academic environment of the College and the University departments.

Timetable of appointments

Junior Research Fellows are appointed by the College Research Committee following interviews in mid-July and mid-January. One Fellow is usually appointed in sciences and one in arts and humanities on each occasion.

For July appointments advertisements will appear in April and May, with closing dates for applications between the end of April and beginning of June. Short listed candidates will be informed in mid-June to early July.

For January appointments advertisements will appear in August with closing dates in September. Shortlisted candidates will be informed in the first part of December.

Advertisements and further particulars will appear on this website when competitions are announced.

Current Junior Research Fellows

See Current Junior Research Fellows.

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