Year 13

Architecture Student Work Exhibition in London (7-9 July)

Architecture Exhibition

A previous ArcSoc exhibition

The University of Cambridge Architecture Society (ArcSoc) annual Summer Show is a presentation of student work in London, with material on display from the initial explorations of first year to the final schemes of third and fifth years.

If you're interested in studying Architecture, do keep an eye on the Summer Show page for further detail of what is happening on 7 - 9 July. During the exhibition there will be an afternoon of free public lectures from contemporary practitioners and university academics, as well as a day for prospective students. The location is G1 F Block, Truman Brewery, 91 Brick Lane, London E1 6QL.

Photos from past shows are also available, and Ines discusses the Summer Show and other ArcSoc activities in her King's Student Perspective.

Date posted: 

Friday 19 June 2015

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Isaac Physics Partnership - resources and events

The Isaac Physics Partnership provides resources to offer support and activities in physics problem-solving to students (and teachers) working from GCSE (Year 11), through sixth form (Years 12 & 13), and to university.
 

The partnership also runs free UK events (funded by the Department for Education) for AS and A2 Physics and Maths education. Here is a list of forthcoming events - do click on the links below for details and booking.

Date posted: 

Friday 12 June 2015

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Economics: Maths is important!

Calculator

Mathematical techniques are an essential tool for Economics. Credit: Horia Varlan

To thrive on the Cambridge Economics course, you need to enjoy (and be good at!) Mathematics at school and have an interest in applying mathematical and statistical tools to economic problems. The first year at Cambridge includes a compulsory course in Quantative Mathods that covers Maths and Statistics (you can read the paper description if you'd like to).

When you look at the course requirements for the Cambridge Economics course, you will notice that Mathematics is a required subject (you can't apply without it). Depending on what qualifications you are applying with, this may be A level Mathematics (there are multiple exam boards), IB Higher Level Mathematics, an Advanced Higher in Mathematics from the Scottish system, Pre-U Mathematics, Advanced Placement Calculus BC if you're taking US qualifications, or Mathematics up to your final year in one of the many other qualifications that we can admit you with.

In A level terms, you are presumed to have mastered the material in modules C1 - C4 by the end of your school maths course, and you will find it easier to tackle the Quantitative Methods course if you have taken module S1. If you don't know what we're talking about, the topics are set out at the top of page 2 in the paper description, or you could always have a look at an A level syllabus specification to compare the content with the maths you've been doing.

If you have the opportunity to take Further Mathematics, that would be very helpful once you start the course, especially the Pure and Statistical options (rather than Mechanics or Decisions Maths). 

Sample questions resource

We know that it can be tricky (especially if you're not studying for A levels) to work out if your mathematical skills will give you a good preparation for Economics at Cambridge. The Director of Studies at King's has prepared some sample mathematical and analytical questions for you to look at. If you work through these questions, we hope that this will give you a good sense of the kind of mathematical and analytical skills that we will be looking for when we consider you for a place.

For more information, do read the Economics course information and the reading, resources and events section on the page about studying Economics here at King's College!

Date posted: 

Wednesday 10 June 2015

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Mathematics for Biologists and Chemists

Test tubes in the laboratoryImage credit: Horia Varlan

Undergraduate Biologists and Chemists will find they need some mathematics in order to access and make the most of their science. Natural Scientists at Cambridge can choose between three first year Mathematics courses: Mathematics (usually taken by those specialising in Physical Sciences), Mathematical Biology (usually taken by those specialising in Biological Sciences), and Elementary Mathematics for Biologists (designed for Biological Scientists who did not take A Level Mathematics or equivalent).

Our Natural Scientists explain that 'knowledge of mathematics is essential for all scientists; it is the language with which we formulate theories and natural laws and express our ideas.' But what can you do to gain fluency in mathematics?  They advise you to 'practise thinking mathematically in non-routine contexts.'

Date posted: 

Monday 8 June 2015

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London Anthropology Day (2 July)

Aztec calendar

An Aztec Calendar. Credit: Michael McCarty

Booking is open for the London Anthropology Day on Thursday 2 July. If you're in Year 12 or Year 13 and would like to participate in biological and social anthropology workshops with lecturers from universities across the UK, as well as explore the British Museum's ethnographic galleries and meet undergraduate students, do read the information and programme, and consider booking a place (the event is free of charge).

Date posted: 

Friday 5 June 2015

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Luminarium - a website for students with a curiosity for English Literature

An old book

Credit: popturf.com

If you're interested in studying English at Cambridge, we recommend that you try to read material from a number of different periods if you can, as the course will introduce you to the full range of literature from the Middle Ages to the present day.

If you want to explore what you could read from some of the earlier periods and are wondering what you might enjoy, why not spend some time browsing the Luminarium website? It's an anthology of English Literature with particularly well-developed sections for Medieval Middle English Literature (1350-1485), Renaissance Literature (1485-1603)Early 17th Century Literature (1603-1660), and Restoration & 18th Century Literature (1660-1785).

Here's a poem by Henry Vaughan (1621-1695) to get you started:

Quickness

False life! a foil and no more, when
                Wilt thou be gone?
Thou foul deception of all men,
That would not have the true come on!

Thou art a moon-like toil ; a blind
                  Self-posing state ;
A dark contest of waves and wind ;
A mere tempestuous debate.

Life is a fix'd, discerning light,   
                   A knowing joy ;
No chance, or fit : but ever bright,
And calm, and full, yet doth not cloy.

'Tis such a blissful thing, that still
                   Doth vivify,
And shine and smile, and hath the skill
To please without eternity.

Thou art a toilsome mole, or less,
                   A moving mist.
But life is, what none can express,
A quickness, which my God hath kiss'd.

For poem and source, see Luminarium. The poet page has further resources including book recommendations.

Date posted: 

Thursday 4 June 2015

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History of Art with the Tate

Gallery at Tate St. IvesA gallery at Tate St Ives. Image credit: Herry Lawford

Tate galleries host the national collection of British art from 1500 to the present day, along with international modern and contemporary art.

If you'd like an introduction to the History of Art, or an opportunity to explore and develop your existing interests in the field, try their free online courses.

If you have the opportunity, visit the Tate:

The Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Museum of Modern Art offer similar free online resources.

Date posted: 

Friday 29 May 2015

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Problem-solving: Moon orbit around the earth

Do you want to be really good at problem-solving? The key is to get plenty of practice.

Here is one of the problems from i-want-to-study-engineering.org, a practice website designed for students who plan to apply for Engineering at top universities:

Assuming that:

  • the average distance between the earth and the moon is 3.8 x 108 m,
  • on average, it takes the moon 29 days to go round the earth,
  • the approximate value of the universal gravitational constant
    G= 6.7 x 10-11m3kg-1s-2.

estimate the mass of the earth.

Is the answer:

  • approximately 5 x 1023kg?
  • approximately 6 x 1024kg?
  • approximately 7 x 1025kg?
  • approximately 42kg?
  • None of the above?

For hints, topic information and answers, see the problem page itself, or for more problems (there are more than 200 available), see the problem index.

Further information:

Date posted: 

Tuesday 26 May 2015

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Spotlight on HSPS: Archaeology

Archaeological excavation at Hierapolis, TurkeyArchaeological excavation at Hierapolis, Turkey. Image Credit: Chris Parfitt

Human, Social, and Political Sciences (HSPS) at Cambridge offers a unique range of related disciplines, which can be studied in many combinations, or with a concentration on a single discipline: you can work on Politics and International Relations, Social Anthropology, Biological Anthropology, Archaeology and / or Sociology. Many (or all) of these subjects will be new to you, so how do you know what's involved?

As the course website explains, Archaeology is the study of the human past. Archaeologists investigate the origins of our species, document the diversity of ancient cultures, and explore the emergence of the first cities and empires. Archaeologists study material remains (from stone tools to monuments) and settlements (from villages to cities) to answer questions including: How did tool use affect evolution of the modern human brain? What can the earliest art tell us about interaction and cognition of early humans? How did daily life change with domestication of plants and animals? What are the sources of social inequality? When - and why - did leadership emerge? How did early empires encompass such vast territories, and why were their rulers so powerful?

Specialist courses in Ayssyriology (the study of Mesopotamia) and Egpytology are also available as part of the HSPS degree.

Find out more:

Date posted: 

Friday 22 May 2015

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Biological Natural Sciences Subject Day: Thursday 16 July

Small cell carcinoma. Image credit: Yale Rosen

Cambridge Institute for Medical Research and King's College are jointly hosting a Biological Natural Sciences Subject Day on Thursday 16 July. Come and meet the CIMR's researchers and students and see the inner workings of their specialist research facilities, including world-class super-resolution microscopy. Join us at King's for lunch and for admissions and research talks by our Directors of Studies in Biological Natural Sciences. This event is open to Year 12 (or Year 13) students at UK schools who are currently researching applications for Biological Natural Sciences at university. Please note that this is not a suitable event for students who wish to apply for and study Medicine at university. Please see the provisional programme and apply online by Friday 19 June.

Date posted: 

Wednesday 20 May 2015

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