Year 13

Cambridge Literary Festival

bookart at the cup bookshopBook art at the CUP bookshop

Every Spring and Winter, Cambridge Literary Festival takes place in venues around the city centre, engaging with the newest fiction, cutting edge commentary and science, children's events and lots more. This year, the festival will run from 5-14 April 2016. Events require booking, and all student tickets are £6. Highlights include:

  • 07 April - Louis de Bernieres - Author of Captain Corelli’s Mandolin and The Dust that Falls from Dreams dicusses his life and work.
  • 09 April - Akala - Hip-Hop Shakespeare demonstrates the similarities between hip-hop and the work of the much-loved bard.
  • 09 April - Irvine Welsh - Author of Trainspotting discusses his new novel, The Blade Artist.
  • 10 April - Charlotte Harman - Biographer of Charlotte Brontë: A Life.
  • 10 April - Faber New Poets -  Showcasing the talents of new poets: Elaine Beckett, Crispin Best, Sam Buchan-Watts and Rachel Curzon.
  • 10 April - Simon Callow - discusses Orson Welles: One Man Band, the third volume of this epic biography.

There are more events listed on the full schedule.

Date posted: 

Monday 7 March 2016

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A is for Aerotropolis

Outside Dubai Airport Dubai Airport - Credit: Fabio Achilli

'Aerotropolis' is a term introduced by John D. Kasarda in 2000 and refers to urban and economic developments centred around major airports. The airport becomes a kind of "airport city", a commercial hub much like a traditional metropolis, with a central business district and transport-linked suburbs.

If you're interested in studying Geography at King's, Matthew Gandy, one of our Fellows, recommends The Dictionary of Human Geography by Derek Gregory, et al., which outlines some of the key concepts and debates in human geography. The journal Nature is also a good place to find articles, such as this recent editorial which argues that environmental agencies must go much further in regulating aircraft emissions if they want to make a real difference.

Date posted: 

Friday 19 February 2016

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Gravitational waves detected 100 years after Einstein’s prediction

An international team of scientists have observed ripples in the fabric of spacetime called gravitational waves, arriving at the earth from a cataclysmic event in the distant universe. This confirms a major prediction of Albert Einstein’s 1915 general theory of relativity and opens an unprecedented new window onto the cosmos.

The gravitational waves were detected on 14 September 2015 by both LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory) detectors in Louisiana and Washington State in the US. They originated from two black holes, each around 30 times the mass of the Sun and located more than 1.3 billion light years from Earth, coalescing to form a single, even more massive black hole.

You can read the full article here.

These findings will be discussed at next month's Cambridge Science Festival during the open afternoon at the Institute of Astronomy.

Date posted: 

Friday 12 February 2016

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What's a Language, Anyway?

Pile of booksCredit: Alan Myers

In a recent article for The Atlantic, John McWhorter considers the differences between a language and a dialect, and how linguists might distinguish between them.

"It turns out that it’s impossible to determine precisely where one “language” leaves off and another begins."

"The serendipities of history chose one “dialect” as a standard and enshrined it on the page."

"Is a dialect, on some level, unsophisticated, as if it doesn’t have a literature because it is unsuited to extended thought and abstraction?"

Read the full article online here. If you're curious about Linguistics, you might also be interested in:

 

Date posted: 

Wednesday 10 February 2016

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INSIGHTS Public Lectures

Image credit: Marijn de Vries Hoogerwe

Do you live near a university? Do check for public lectures. For example, the INSIGHTS lectures at Newcastle University are free and open to all.

Attending university lectures is a brilliant way to inform, stimulate, and excite debate.  These lectures aim to cover a wide range of disciplines and are a great way for you to explore contemporary issues, particularly those that affect our daily lives. Here is a taster of what is on offer:

Upcoming Lectures

You can also listen to recordings of previous lectures if you explore the archive section. You may find the recordings ordered by theme especially useful (click on the headings in the menu on the left of the page).

Date posted: 

Friday 5 February 2016

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Friday 19 February - Informal Meeting for Prospective Students

View of Bodley's CourtAre you thinking of making an application to Cambridge this October, and would it help to come and talk to us at King's? Friday 19 February would be a good time if you're able to come to Cambridge as we're holding a meeting for prospective students for an hour that day. It's nothing complicated - just a chance to meet Heather (one of our Admissions Officers) and ask any questions that you have at this stage. The meeting will be followed by a short tour of the college, or if you'd prefer to walk around the grounds of King's using our self-guided tour, you'll be very welcome to.

If you're interested in attending this informal meeting, do send us a quick email to book a place, including your name and the course you're interested in. We'll then send you further information.

Date posted: 

Monday 1 February 2016

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Veterinary Medicine Open Day

The Department of Veterinary Medicine, perhaps surprisingly, has a long tradition of studying infectious diseases. Their work is wide-reaching, and combines leading experts in veterinary and biological sciences, public health and social sciences, ecology and wildlife health. - To find out more you can book a place on their open day (Bookings will open at 10.30am on Monday 8 February)

For more science events, do browse the Cambridge Science Festival programme. Booking opens at 10:30am on 8 February

Date posted: 

Friday 29 January 2016

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Oxford and Cambridge Classics Conference for Sixth Formers

Statue from the museum of classical archaeology

On 18 March 2016, together with colleagues at Oxford, the Cambridge Classics Faculty will be holding the joint Oxford and Cambridge Classics Conference for Sixth Formers.

This year, this will take place at Cambridge. The day provides an opportunity to hear a range of university-style Classics lectures, to find out more about the Classics courses at the two Universities, student life, and the admissions process, and to ask any questions you have.

Full information and a booking form is available on the Classics the Greeks, the Romans and us website.

Date posted: 

Wednesday 27 January 2016

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Reith Lectures on Black Holes (Stephen Hawking)

Each year the BBC invites leading speakers in different fields to deliver the Reith lectures, which are broadcast on Radio 4. The subject of this year's Reith Lectures is Black Holes and the speaker is Stephen Hawking. If you have not already caught them, you might enjoy the following Radio 4 broadcasts:

..and if you'd like to test your knowledge, do have a look at this quiz on black holes.

Information about accessing BBC iplayer content outside the UK: See this information and see the podcast download page.

NB. This is an example of a resource that can be accessed from lots of different places. We tag such posts with 'all locations'. If you live some way from Cambridge, clicking on the all locations page can be useful so that you filter out events in Cambridge and events in specific areas of the UK.

Date posted: 

Wednesday 27 January 2016

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