Year 13

Inside Dyson's new engineering centre at Cambridge University

The Dyson Centre for Engineering Design opens today at Cambridge University, a new building that has been constructed with a £8m grant from the Dyson Foundation. The Centre will provide the space for 1,200 engineers to build prototypes, test, and collaborate on projects. The Centre provides:

  • Modern rapid prototyping hardware such as 3D printers, and materials for rapid 3D printing and 2D cutting
  • A range of hands‐on and interactive aids demonstrating new engineering concepts
  • Interactive apparatus to familiarise and offer experiences of engineering concepts giving students knowledge and confidence to invent and innovate their own designs and creations
  • Machine tools including lathes and milling machines
  • More equipment to come

The undergraduate space is already a hive of activity, with students creating models on the new 3D printers, using the new laser cutters, and even making their own parts in the machine tooling area. You can read more about the Centre in this article or find out about studying Engineering at King's.

Date posted: 

Monday 9 May 2016


What is it like to be a King's mathematician?

Corridor party

A corridor party in the Keynes accommodation

We hope that you are enjoying the new accounts in the King's Student Perspectives series. We now have a new one for Maths as well - Ellen has very kindly shared her experiences as a second year Maths student at King's.

Ellen's account includes (amongst other things):

If you are interested in applying for maths and you want to find out more about STEP papers after reading this account, do have a look at our Maths page, and in particular the resources section, which has some useful links for STEP Exams.

Date posted: 

Friday 29 April 2016


Topical news debate

Question time panel

Can you think of a recent news story that has particularly interested you or got you thinking? Or one that has caused a lot of controversy?

You might be interested in the weekly Question Time programmes on BBC 1, with topical discussion and debate chaired by David Dimbleby. This week's programme was filmed in Hull and the panellists were Conservative communities secretary Greg Clark, Labour's shadow home secretary Andy Burnham, former leader of the SNP Alex Salmond, former director of the Centre for Policy Studies Jill Kirby, and hedge fund manager and chairman of the ARK chain of academies Paul Marshall.

Who do you agree / disagree with?

International Students: unfortunately you can't access BBC iplayer outside the UK, however there is an equivalent Radio 4 programme which you should be able to access on BBC iplayer Radio called Any Questions (and Any Answers)

Date posted: 

Thursday 28 April 2016


Free Taster Day in Latin and Classics

Latin text

Credit: Dan Diffendale

Have you ever tried learning Latin? Do you want to give it a go? The Classics Faculty is holding a Latin Taster Day on Saturday 18 June 2016 so that you can explore learning Latin for the first time, with language classes and a lecture on the Ancient World.

As the Classics course at Cambridge has a four-year option for students who are studying Latin for the first time, this is a very good opportunity to get a sense of whether Classics is for you.

All school-age students are welcome. The day is free to attend, please bring a packed lunch, and there are a limited number of hardship travel bursaries available. Please see the further information and booking.

Date posted: 

Tuesday 26 April 2016


Shakespeare's 400th Anniversary

The Royal Shakespeare Theatre in Stratford upon avonThe Royal Shakespeare Theatre in Stratford-upon-Avon.

Credit: Phil Dolby

You may have read in the news recently that 23 April 2016 marked the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare's death.

On last week's BBC Radio 4 Saturday Live, Edward Wilson-Lee (Faculty of English) and Victoria Bartels (Faculty of History) contributed to the commemorations of the death of Shakespeare.

The BBC Shakespeare Festival has lots more TV & Radio programmes coming up, as well as articles on historical performances, and Much Ado Near Me, which features regional Shakespeare resources, including clips and articles for Newcastle, York and the Tees.

There are also upcoming events in and around London as part of Shakespeare400, a season of cultural and artistic events throughout the year celebrating Shakespeare's creative achievement and his profound influence on culture across the centuries. Events include theatre, music, opera, dance, and exhibitions. Some highlights:

Date posted: 

Sunday 24 April 2016


What is it really like to study HSPS at King's?


The latest King's Student Perspectives piece is written by Ceylon, who is studying Human, Social and Political Sciences (HSPS) here at King's:

In her account, Ceylon writes about why she chose the course, what  the teaching is like, the workload and what she likes to do when she is not working, the social life in King's and College families, where and how she likes to do her work, and her thoughts on admissions interviews.

Date posted: 

Thursday 21 April 2016


Join The Conversation

models hugging each other Read about the science of hugs. Credit: Meg Cheng

The Conversation is an online source of news and views from the academic and research community. Their aim is to allow for a better understanding of current affairs and complex issues - so that conversations are started!

Here are a few recent articles by subject:

Date posted: 

Tuesday 12 April 2016


Advice from the Computer Science Faculty

William Gates Building

The William Gates Faculty Building on the West Cambridge Site.

Are you interested in Computer Science? Here is the Faculty advice (from the FAQ's) about developing your interests for this subject:

At the admissions stage we look for two major things: academic ability and passion for the subject. Whilst the course itself does not have any pre-requisites other than mathematics, it is difficult to discern a passion for the subject if a candidate has never tried any form of Computer Science. Therefore, from an admissions perspective, it would be wise to do something that shows your independent interest in the area. Examples of this include reading around the subject, learning a programming language, contributing to open-source projects, releasing a phone app, or building hardware (robots etc). Any one of these, when done well, would be sufficient to demonstrate your passion.

If you choose to learn a new language, it may be a good idea to learn one that is not explicitly taught in the Tripos. Doing so obviously helps to avoid repetition, but also gives you a wider perspective on languages that can be useful later in the degree and in employment. A popular choice is python, for which there are many tutorials available.

We recommend getting hold of a Raspberry Pi and following one of the many hardware and software tutorials for it on the web. An additional advantage of this route is that you will gain familiarity with the UNIX command line: a very valuable skill to have in the Tripos!

Find out more on the King's Computer Science page including what we are looking for in applicants.

Date posted: 

Sunday 3 April 2016


Tom's account - guess the subject!

Question mark

Credit: Leimenide

Tom is from rural Lincolnshire and has written a detailed King's Student Perspectives account about studying at King's. But which course do you think he is describing below?

The wonderful images of artefacts and the obscure topics in the prospectus entry had me instantly hooked, and I immediately wanted to find out more about the course. I had originally intended to study History at Cambridge, and to specialise in this period, but as soon as I saw ?????? I knew straight away that it was
for me! After some further research, it was the small size of the faculty and the total freedom that the course offers from the first year that drew me to it.

The best thing about studying ????? is that it’s an intellectually stimulating experience. The course is enjoyable in its own right – the system of lectures,
translation classes and supervisions, along with the ready availability of relevant books, means that you can pursue the interests you have in mind when applying to the full. You’ll never find yourself with nothing to do – and this is not necessarily a bad thing! ????? material is interesting and it will always keep you on your toes, which makes for a challenging but enjoyable lifestyle.

You can find out  what Tom's course is and how he as found it in his Student Perspective, and you might like to ask yourself some questions about the material in his course, find out more, and even come along to an open day on 22 June.

Date posted: 

Saturday 2 April 2016


11 April - Physics talk in Oxford

Are you interested in Physics? Do you live near Oxford?

  • Talk: Investigating the origins of magnetic fields using the largest laser on Earth
  • Speaker: Dr Jena Meinecke
  • Date: 11 Apr 2016 - 6:00pm - 7:00pm
  • Venue: Martin Wood Complex, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU
  • Audience: General public (Age 14+)
  • Further information and booking: Oxford University Physics Department website

Date posted: 

Friday 1 April 2016



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