Year 13

Want to visit Cambridge during the summer?


Prospective students are always welcome to visit

Remember that you are welcome to visit any time, even if there's not an official open day on.

  • If you would like to look around a college, it is best to introduce yourself at the porters' lodge (the reception). Porters are normally happy for prospective students to walk around the public areas and will give you any maps / information available. There's also a map of Cambridge, which shows where the colleges are. You'll see that the middle of Cambridge is quite small, so you will be able to walk between most colleges easily.
  • If you would like to visit King's, do introduce yourself at the porters' lodge when you arrive. The college will be open to prospective students and we have a self-guided tour that you can use.
  • You may like to visit on a day when we're running an informal meeting for prospective students. Do email us with your name and the subject you are interested in if you would like to book a place one one of these meetings.
  • There are some great museums and teaching collections which you might like to explore, most of which are free to visit. Or you might like to check the 'what's on' list for the day you are visiting - there are often talks and exhibitions on, as well as the Shakespeare Festival.

Date posted: 

Wednesday 20 July 2016


Cambridge Shakespeare Festival 2016

Fellows Garden

King's College Gardens

The Cambridge Shakespeare Festival takes place in July and August, with eight plays performed outside in some of the beautiful College gardens. Do see the website for full details.

11 July - 30 July 2016:

Character from A Midsummer Night's Dream

Credit: Cambridge Shakespeare Festival

1 - 20 August 2016:

1 - 27 August 2016:

Date posted: 

Tuesday 19 July 2016


Engineering Open Day Talks

engineering open day

A previous Engineering Open Day. Credit: Engineering at Cambridge

Thinking about Engineering, but didn't manage to make it to an Open Day? The Department of Engineering have uploaded videos of their open day talks online, as well as handouts of the slideshows.

You can find out about upcoming Engineering Open Days here or find out more about Engineering at King's on our subject page.

Date posted: 

Monday 18 July 2016


What's it like to study Music?

Examples of historical writing

Student in Chetwynd Court

Reading in Chetwynd Court

Are you interested in applying for one of the History degrees this October? Remember that the application process is not only about grades! We will be looking for students who have developed their interests in History and have the potential to succeed in this subject at Cambridge.

There is no set reading for History, History and Politics or History and Modern Languages. You may have already found material that you are enjoying, however if you are not sure what to read (where to start?) and are looking for some specific History material to look at over the summer, we hope that these examples of historical writing will be useful.

Date posted: 

Monday 27 June 2016


How is Britain Changing?

london central

Credit: Pedro Szekely

The competition for the Young Geographer of the Year Award provides students with the opportunity to explore geographical change from many different perspectives, at both local and national scales.

To enter, sixth form students must produce a 1500 word essay. Entries which illustrate how students have collected and used data from a variety of sources, including the collection of first-hand data through fieldwork, are encouraged. You can find full information, including details for how younger students can enter, on the entry form.

The deadline for all entries is 9:00 Friday 14 October 2016.

Date posted: 

Wednesday 15 June 2016


What is it really like to study Economics?

What it is like to study languages?

Reading Suggestions for Geography

Thinking of applying for Geography? There is no required reading for applicants, but the Director of Studies in Geography has provided some interesting and helpful reading suggestions to give a flavour of the material that you can study in the course. We also advise you to follow up on areas of your school courses that you have enjoyed.

You can find more ideas for developing your interests on the Geography page under reading, resources and events, or search for more social sciences posts.

Date posted: 

Sunday 15 May 2016


The Charles Darwin Papers

primate skeleton in the museum of zoologyThe University's Museum of Zoology holds some specimens from Darwin's famous voyage on the Beagle

Credit: Andrew Griffin

The Charles Darwin Papers in Cambridge University Library hold nearly the entire existing collection of Darwin’s working scientific papers. Among these documents are Charles Darwin’s Evolution Manuscripts, his papers on the transmutation of species. Using these notebooks, annotations, and portfolios, Darwin wrote the nine of his fifteen books that set down, enlarged and defended the theory of evolution by natural selection. You can find the papers online at the Darwin Manuscripts Project.

The Darwin Correspondence Project also holds online resources for students, including a Darwin Timeline showing the key moments in Darwin's life and what was happening in Britain at the time, plus a series of audio clips and videos on Darwin's work. For example, the Face of Emotion series discusses Darwin’s work on expression in the context of current research in artificial intelligence, autism, and neuroscience. You can even try Darwin's Emotion Experiment for yourself here.

Date posted: 

Thursday 12 May 2016



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