Year 13

What's on? Public lectures at a university near you

Image credit: Marijn de Vries Hoogerwe

Universities share their latest research in public lectures, open to all, free of charge:

If you can't make it on the day, universities very often publish videos or transcripts of their public lectures on their websites after the event. For example, browse the latest uploads to the University of Cambridge's Video and Audio Service.

Date posted: 

Saturday 7 February 2015


The Triple Helix Science in Society Review

Lego helix

Credit: Michael Knowles

The Triple Helix is one of the science societies in Cambridge. Each term, it publishes the Science in Society Review, with articles spanning a range of scientific disciplines but with a common focus on the interactions between science and society.

You may be interested to look at some of the previous issues:

If you are considering an application to study science at Cambridge, you may find Science in Society Review 6 from Lent term 2009 particularly useful: This was a special issue about Cambridge's rich history of science and discovery, produced for the University's 800th anniversary.

Would you like to get a short article published in the next issue of Science in Society Review? The society is running a science writing competition for sixth form students in the UK and will publish the winning entries. If you would like to take part, please read the competition details and submission form. The deadline for submissions is 21 February 2015.

Date posted: 

Thursday 5 February 2015


Education at Cambridge

Education Faculty, University of Cambridge. Image credit: Steve Day

Cambridge is one of only a few universities to offer a degree in Education as an academic discipline. In the course of three years you explore Education as a broad social science, tackling its history, philosophy, psychology, and sociology. You combine your studies in Education with another subject, choosing from Biological or Physical Sciences, English, English and Drama, Modern and Medieval Languages, Classics, Geography, History, Music, or Religious Studies. Whilst the Education degree may be a route into teaching, educational psychology, research, policy, or publishing, it also opens up a wide range of career paths outside of Education. King's doesn't offer the Education degree, but you can apply to study it at most Cambridge colleges.

Date posted: 

Thursday 5 February 2015


Royal Shakespeare Company broadcasts in local cinemas

Did you know that the Royal Shakespeare Company broadcasts performances to local cinemas around the UK and beyond?

If you are studying any works by Shakespeare, do visit the RSC onscreen website to find out about broadcasts in cinemas.

If you go to the cinemas and tickets page, you can look up what you could see near to where you live. For example, venues in Northumberland include The Maltings in Berwick upon Tweed, The Forum in Hexham, The Alnwick Playhouse and Vue cinemas in Cramlington.

Further information about the Royal Shakespeare Company is available on their website.

Date posted: 

Wednesday 4 February 2015


The Cambridge Science Festival programme is published

Hands-on activity

Science Saturday - a hands-on Engineering activity assisted by Cambridge undergraduates

Bookings open on Monday 9 February at 10.30am for the large 2015 Cambridge Science Festival running from 9 - 22 March 2015

There is a Cambridge Science Festival app, which you can search for on iTunes or Google Play.

Examples of talks:

  • Mon 9 March (17:30 - 18:30) - There's no business like flow business (age 15+)
    Inreasingly cells are providing us with answers. Scientists at the Babraham Institute carry out vital research on cells and cellular processes to learn how the body works and how it changes as we age. In this lecture, Rachel Walker and Becky Newman explain flow cytometry and how how it takes us a step further in understanding cells and cell populations.
    (Booking required)
  • Tues 10 March (17:00 - 18:00) - Colour, new dimensions, and the geometry of physics (age 15+)
    Professor Frank Wilczek from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is one of the leading theoretical physicists of our time. Known for his discovery of asymptotic freedom, for which he received the Nobel Prize in 2004, his research ranges across particle physics, astrophysics and condensed matter physics.
    (booking required)
  • Thurs 12 March (18:00 - 19:00) - Melioidosis:biothreat infection and paddy-field disease (age 15+)
    Professor Sharon Peacock is a clinical microbiologist in the Department of Medicine, and works closely with Public Health England and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Intitute. In this talk, Professor Peacock shows how sequencing techniques can be applied to to study of Melioidosis, an infectious disease of tropical climates.
    (booking required)
  • Fri 13  March (18:00 - 19:00) - Searching for intelligence in the legs: robots that walk, run and dance (age 15+)
    Although there is enormous success in the use of robotic arms for the automation industry, robotic legs are very challenging to be engineered and used in our daily lives. Dr Fumiya Lida discusses why legs are so special, and whether we will see robots running around in the near future.
    (booking required)

Date posted: 

Saturday 31 January 2015


Law Essay Competition

Trinity College has an annual Robert Walker essay competition open to students in Year 12 or Year 13  (the final two years of school).

The title set for this year's competition is:

"Should people be able to sell their bodily organs (e.g., their kidney(s) or liver)?"

If working on this question appeals to you, do ensure that you read the competition details on the Trinity College website. The deadline for entries is Monday 20 April 2015.

Essay competitions can be a good opportunity to get your teeth into an interesting and relevant question and to develop your research and argument skills. You will see in the competition details that the assessors will be looking at a range of factors, including how well your argument is sustained, the quality of your language, and how well you have used appropriate supporting material and facts in evidence for your arguments. Of course, these are questions it is worth asking yourself about all of your written work, whether for a competition or not!

Date posted: 

Saturday 31 January 2015


Teesside University Psychology Sixth Form Conference

Neurological studiesImage credit: Tim Sheerman-Chase

Teesside University is holding a Psychology Sixth Form Conference next Wednesday (4 February). Teesside staff and students will introduce you to diverse and topical aspects of psychology, including forensic psychology, counselling, educational psychology, and sports psychology. Year 12s and 13s (and mature students) can sign up online now, either as individuals or in school groups.

Date posted: 

Monday 26 January 2015


History Virtual Classroom


What role can a historical novel play in the study of History?
Credit: Martha Garvey

If you enjoy studying History and want to know more about what it is like at university level, make sure that you have a look at the History Faculty's virtual classroom:

Date posted: 

Friday 5 December 2014


OpenCampus at the University of Hull

Joseph Hillier sculpture 'Moving Matters' (2007) outside the Logistics Institute, Hull University Business SchoolJoseph Hillier, Moving Matters (2007), displayed outside the Logistics Institute, Hull University Business School

The University of Hull's OpenCampus programme offers an informal and friendly way for you to learn at your local university.

  • Drop into the Culture Café, which this term is focusing on Literature and Creative Writing. On Saturday 6 December at 11am, Dr. Daniel Weston, Lecturer in Twentieth-Century English Literature, is discussing 'Poetry for the City? Philip Larkin and Others.' This is part of the North and South Project, a collaboration betwen the University of Hull and the University of Southampton to explore what unites and divides their respective port cities. Next term's programme for the Culture Café is already available here.
  • Join a Tea-Time Talk, a series which launched this term around the theme of Society and Culture. On Tuesday 2 December at 6.15pm, Dr. Simon Green, Senior Lecturer in Community Justice and Criminology, explores 'Deviancy, destitution and moral degeneracy.' Why, he asks, do politicians and commentators increasingly explain crime and disorder with reference to moral character, instead of socio-economic conditions?

Places are limited, so booking is essential. To find out more and book a place, please contact the OpenCampus team directly.

Date posted: 

Wednesday 26 November 2014


Can science make a cyclist faster?

Theo Bos

Credit: jonthescone

Prof Tony Purnell will be giving the next lecture in the Cambridge Physics Lecture Series for Year 12 and Year 13 students at 6pm on Tuesday 2 December. 

Please see the details and directions.

The lecture will provide an overview of how science and engineering contribute to the raw speed of all Olympic cycling disciplines.

No need to book - just turn up!

Related resources:

Date posted: 

Monday 24 November 2014



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