Year 13

Spotlight on HSPS: Sociology

Image credit: Mehran Heidarzadeh

Human, Social, and Political Sciences (HSPS) at Cambridge offers a unique range of related disciplines, which can be studied in many combinations, or with a concentration on a single discipline: you can work on Politics and International Relations, Social Anthropology, Biological Anthropology, Archaeology and / or Sociology. Many (or all) of these subjects will be new to you, so how do you know what's involved?

Sociology is the study of modern societies and how they are changing today. Ever wonder why nationalism is such a powerful force in the modern world? Why there are protests, riots, and uprisings? Why Europe is in crisis? Why politicians are not trusted? Why Africa is so poor? Why racism persists? Why same-sex marriage causes such controversy? How globalization is changing our lives? Whether societies could ever be more just? Then Sociology is the subject for you.

Date posted: 

Thursday 16 April 2015


Café Scientifique: science for the price of a coffee

A Cafe Scientifique meeting in Reading, debating 'food out of season: good or evil?' Image credit: Karen Blakeman

Café Scientifique is a place where, for the price of a cup of coffee, anyone can come to explore the latest ideas in science and technology. Meetings take place in cafés, bars, restaurants and even theatres, but always outside a traditional academic context.

Since 1998, cafés have covered almost every conceivable scientific topic: AIDS, the Big Bang, biodiversity, cancer, code-breaking, consciousness, Darwinism, ecology, evolution, extreme life, foetal experience, genetically modified organisms, global warming, infertility, nanotechnology, the Public Understanding of Science movement, sports science, superconductors and more.

Cafés Scientifique are also held in North America, South America, elsewhere in Europe, and Asia, Africa, and Australasia. From Bangkok, Thailand to Santa Fe, Argentina, you can find a forum to share your love of science and technology!

Date posted: 

Wednesday 15 April 2015


Introduction to Archives Workshop for Sixth Formers at King's

Kennesaw State University ArchivesKennesaw State University Archives. Image credit: Anne G

  • Are you currently taking AS / A Level History or English Literature?
  • Are you interested in finding out about and using archives in your work?

If so, King's College Archive Centre invites you to an Introduction to Archives Workshop on Friday 10 April, using the papers of Rupert Brooke.

Peter Monteith, an archivist at King's College, will explore approaches to using archives for research with you. You will then gain experience of archives, through an exploration of the life, poetry, and myth surrounding King's student and First World War poet Rupert Brooke.

The workshop will equip you to use the King's College Archive Centre yourself, either during an optional reading room session on the morning of Saturday 11 April (numbers limited) or at another time during the Centre's normal opening hours.

See the programme for the workshop and email us now at to book a place. 

NB. Are you at a state school in one of the areas listed below? If so, please do request accommodation through the Year 12 Link Area Accommodation Scheme at King's for this or any other event advertised on the Cambridge page!

Date posted: 

Monday 23 March 2015


Trinity College Residentials for UK Sixth Formers in Cambridge

Fountain, Great Court, Trinity College, CambridgeFountain in the Great Court, Trinity College, Cambridge. Image credit: Matthias Rosenkranz

Trinity College, Cambridge is offering subject-specific residential visits in the Easter and Summer vacations. They are completely free, including accommodation and all meals, and they are open to applications from all students at UK schools who will be at least 16 by the first day of the residential.

Booking has now opened for the Humanities Residential which will take place during the Easter vacation from Tuesday 7 to Thursday 9 April.

Applications will be opening soon for the following residentials which will take place during the Summer vacation:

  • Science Residential: Thursday 25 to Saturday 27 June
  • Law Residential: Tuesday 30 June to Wednesday 1 July
  • Music Residential: Thursday 9 to Saturday 11 of July
  • Language-based Humanities Residential: Monday 24 – Tuesday 25 August

Keep checking the Access at Trinity website for updates.

Date posted: 

Monday 23 February 2015


Economics essay competition


Credit: (cropped)

The Royal Economic Society runs an annual competition for students studying Economics at school, with questions based on key elements of your syllabus. 

You may find the questions set for this year's competition interesting to think about:

  • "Countries like Greece caused the Eurozone crisis by running up too much debt, so it is only fair that they should bear most of the burden of fixing it." Discuss.
  • Should the Government support manufacturing?  If so, how?
  • Should raising GDP be the primary objective of economic policy?
  • "The rising gap between rich and poor is not just bad for society, it is bad for growth." Discuss.
  • Should "fracking" be allowed? If so, who should benefit?
  • "It is immoral for the drug companies to charge large sums for drugs that are cheap to manufacture." Discuss.
  • "High saving promotes faster growth. So having  more savers in the global economy should be good for our long term prosperity."
  • "Does the economic case favour a new airport runway at Heathrow, Gatwick or elsewhere?"

You may also find it useful to look at the essay titles and winning entries from previous years (bottom of the page).

If you are studying Economics and are interested in entering an essay for this competition, do ensure that you read the full details and entry criteria on the Royal Economic Society website before you start work. The deadline for entry is Monday 30 June 2015.

Date posted: 

Thursday 12 February 2015


Antarctic glaciers

Antarctic peninsula

The Northern Antarctic Peninsula. Credit: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is a very useful and interesting website on the the science of Antarctic glaciology written by Dr Bethan Davies from Royal Holloway, University of London. Here is the introduction:

Antarctic glaciers are beautiful and awe-inspiring. They affect us through their connections with the ocean and sea level, and environmental change is having rapid consequences in Antarctica. Antarctica is the world’s largest ice sheet, covering ~14,000,000 km2. Much of the ice sheet surface lies above 3000 m above sea level. This massive thickness of ice drowns whole mountain ranges, and numerous volcanoes exist underneath the icey exterior. It’s the world’s fifth largest continent, and it is, on average, the highest and coldest continent. Antarctica also provides a unique record of the Earth’s past climate, through the geomorphological record of glacier moraines, through ice cores, through deep sea sediment cores, and through past records of sea level rise.

If you would like to find out more about this fascinating topic, do explore the website, which includes information about different types of glacier, ice shelves, and ice streams as well as the section on glaciers and climate. There is a lot of material that you'll enjoy browsing, and if you are taking A level Geography, this section helps you to find the relevant material for different parts of your course. You can also ask questions here.

Date posted: 

Thursday 12 February 2015


Chemistry and Materials Sciences at Cambridge Science Festival

Medicine at Cambridge Science Festival

Maths and Physics at Cambridge Science Festival


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