Year 13

Summer Medicine Residential at King's: 23 - 24 June 2015

Skeleton, front court, King'sKing's skeleton

King's College Student Union invites prospective Medics at UK state schools and colleges to apply for our Summer Medicine Residential. If you're currently researching an application for Medicine at university, and would like to have a taste of what studying at Cambridge is like, this event could be for you! The participants will attend supervisions in Biochemistry, Physiology, and Anatomy, participate in admissions workshops, and visit the Gurdon Institute. The residential begins at 12 midday on Tuesday 23 June, ends at 3pm on Wednesday 24 June, and includes one night's accommodation and all meals free of charge. We ask students to arrange their travel to Cambridge and cover their own transport costs. Priority will be given to those students travelling from further afield.

Date posted: 

Friday 8 May 2015

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Coding Summer School for Girls

Maths on a whiteboard
Are you female, aged 16-19, and interested in getting started with computer programming? If so, do apply for a place on the Cambridge Coding Academy Summer School for Girls, which will run from 10-14 August inclusive. The booking deadline is fast approaching so do apply today.

The summer school is supported by generous industry sponsorship, though do be aware that there remains a cost of £99. Subsidised accommodation is available in Queens' College and St John's College.

Please see the full information for details and to make an application.

Date posted: 

Thursday 7 May 2015

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Bite the Ballot? Voting Age and Youth Political Participation

Polling stationWould voting online increase youth participation? Image credit: Martin Bamford

Today is polling day in the United Kingdom General Election 2015.

The Electoral Commission will fill you in on who is eligible to vote. For those who are registered to vote, they advise on how to vote today.

How old should you be to vote? 18, as in UK General Elections, or 16, as in the Scottish Independence Referendum?

Younger people remain less likely to vote than older people.  Does it matter? How can youth political participation be boosted? Should we even try?

Date posted: 

Thursday 7 May 2015

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UK Supreme Court: see justice done

UK Supreme CourtUK Supreme Court. Image credit: IanVisits

The Supreme Court is the highest court in the United Kingdom; it is the final court of appeal in the UK for civil cases and in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland for criminal cases:

The Judicial Committee of the Privy Council (JCPC) is housed in the same building and formed in part by the Supreme Court Justices.  It is the highest court of appeal for many current and former Commonwealth countries, as well as the United Kingdom’s overseas territories, crown dependencies, and military sovereign base areas:

The Supreme Court and the JCPC have been live streaming their hearings for some time. Today, they have launched an on-demand archive of past hearings, which is expected to hold as many as 150 courtroom hearings and 900 hours of recordings at any one time.

You can also:

Date posted: 

Tuesday 5 May 2015

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Lorca: Amor en el Jardin

Gala Theatre entrance

Dr Michael Thompson from Durham University will give a pre-show talk at the 5 May performance. Image credit:  mrgarethm

Théâtre sans Frontières is currently touring the UK with an adaptation of Lorca's El Amor de Don Perlimplín con Belisa en su Jardín.

The play is performed in Spanish with English surtitles.

  • until 25 April  - Southwark Playhouse, London
  • 27 April - Theatre Royal, Winchester
  • 28 April - The Brewhouse, Taunton
  • 30 April - Hazlitt Arts Centre, Maidstone
  • 5 May - Gala Theatre, Durham
  • 6 May - Queen's Hall Arts Centre, Hexham
  • 11 & 12 May - Z-arts, Manchester
  • 14 May - Nottingham Lakeside Arts

Do see the information and booking for further details.

Date posted: 

Tuesday 21 April 2015

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Language and thought in children

Child reading

Credit: Gordon (image cropped)

One of the forthcoming public lectures at Newcastle University is on what happens when children develop language. Does language provide new ways of thinking about the world?

  • Date: 12 May
  • Time: 17:30 - 18:45
  • Speaker: Professor Jill de Villiers, from the Department of Psychology at Smith College, Massachusetts
  • Location: Curtis Auditorium, Herschel Building, Newcastle University
  • Admission: Free of charge, open to the public, no booking required.

Information about the lecture is on the Newcastle University website, and if you download a map of Newcastle University Campus, the Herschel Building is number 17.

Do you live near a university? Do keep an eye out for interesting public lectures by members of their departments and visiting scholars!

Date posted: 

Tuesday 21 April 2015

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Spotlight on HSPS: Biological and Social Anthropology

Exhibit at the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology in Cambridge. Image credit: B

Human, Social, and Political Sciences (HSPS) at Cambridge offers a unique range of related disciplines, which can be studied in many combinations, or with a concentration on a single discipline: you can work on Politics and International Relations, Social Anthropology, Biological Anthropology, Archaeology and / or Sociology. Many (or all) of these subjects will be new to you, so how do you know what's involved?

Biological Anthropology is a field which explores human biology and evolution. With an emphasis on the interaction between biology and culture, it sits firmly between the social and biological sciences. Biological anthropologists study human origins and diversity in present and past populations in the context of their culture, behaviour, life-style, morphological and molecular variation. What aspects of our biology and behaviour are uniquely human and what do we share with other species? Why is there so little genetic variation among humans across the world? Are we still evolving and why has natural selection not eradicated disease? Can a statistical test save lives?

Social Anthropology addresses the really big question – what does it mean to be human? – by taking as its subject matter the full range of human social and cultural diversity: the amazingly varied ways that people live, think and relate to each other in every part of the world. What does this diversity tell us about the fundamental bases and possibilities of human social and political life? Can it help us to comprehend the sheer unpredictability of how contemporary global changes manifest themselves in people's lives across the world?

Find out more:

Date posted: 

Wednesday 22 April 2015

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University of Hull's OpenCampus Programme

Joseph Hillier, Moving Matters (2007), displayed outside the Logistics Institute, Hull University Business School. Image credit: Gnomonic.

It's a new term at the University of Hull's OpenCampus programme:

  • There is a new series of Tea-Time Talks, focusing on health and wellbeing, held on Tuesday evenings from 6.15pm to 7.45pm. The series will kick off with a talk by Professor Andrew L. Clark, Chair of Clinical Cardiology at Hull York Medical School, on 'The world's number one killer: "can you save yourselves?"' on Tuesday 5 May.
  • The Culture Café will be celebrating postgraduate and postdoctoral research emerging from the Department of English on Wednesdays from 2pm to 4.30pm. In the first session, Emma Butcher will explore the Brontës' childhood writings on Wednesday 6 May. 

Places are limited, so booking is essential. You can register online, or call Nicola Sharp or Jackie McAndrew on 01482 466321 / 466585.

Date posted: 

Tuesday 21 April 2015

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Spotlight on HSPS: Sociology

Image credit: Mehran Heidarzadeh

Human, Social, and Political Sciences (HSPS) at Cambridge offers a unique range of related disciplines, which can be studied in many combinations, or with a concentration on a single discipline: you can work on Politics and International Relations, Social Anthropology, Biological Anthropology, Archaeology and / or Sociology. Many (or all) of these subjects will be new to you, so how do you know what's involved?

Sociology is the study of modern societies and how they are changing today. Ever wonder why nationalism is such a powerful force in the modern world? Why there are protests, riots, and uprisings? Why Europe is in crisis? Why politicians are not trusted? Why Africa is so poor? Why racism persists? Why same-sex marriage causes such controversy? How globalization is changing our lives? Whether societies could ever be more just? Then Sociology is the subject for you.

Date posted: 

Thursday 16 April 2015

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Café Scientifique: science for the price of a coffee

A Cafe Scientifique meeting in Reading, debating 'food out of season: good or evil?' Image credit: Karen Blakeman

Café Scientifique is a place where, for the price of a cup of coffee, anyone can come to explore the latest ideas in science and technology. Meetings take place in cafés, bars, restaurants and even theatres, but always outside a traditional academic context.

Since 1998, cafés have covered almost every conceivable scientific topic: AIDS, the Big Bang, biodiversity, cancer, code-breaking, consciousness, Darwinism, ecology, evolution, extreme life, foetal experience, genetically modified organisms, global warming, infertility, nanotechnology, the Public Understanding of Science movement, sports science, superconductors and more.

Cafés Scientifique are also held in North America, South America, elsewhere in Europe, and Asia, Africa, and Australasia. From Bangkok, Thailand to Santa Fe, Argentina, you can find a forum to share your love of science and technology!

Date posted: 

Wednesday 15 April 2015

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