Year 12

Exhibitions at the Kirkleatham Museum, East Cleveland

Kirkleatham Museum

Entrance to the Kirkleatham Museum. Credit: David (cropped)

If you are interested in old Anglo-Saxon history, you might enjoy visiting the Kirkleatham Museum in Redcar & Cleveland, which is home to some important exhibitions:

  • The Saxon Princess
    This popular exhibition is based on a six-year archeological project in East Cleveland, in which archaeologist Dr Steve Sherlock and local volunteers made some spectacular finds - a royal burial site and precious metal jewellery from an un-named Anglo-Saxon princess, dating back to the seventh century.  See this short film of Steve Sherlock speaking about the area.
  • Street House before the Saxons
    Linked to the Saxon Princess material, this second exhibition is based on Dr Steve Sherlock's other excavations between 1979 and 2004. Through photographs, films and archaeological objects, you can find out more about a Neolithic cairn from around 3,000 BC, Bronze Age burial sites and the remains of a timber house and timber circles that date from around 2,000 BC, as well as a Roman villa (AD 370) and Anglo-Saxon village.

More infomation about visiting the museum is available on the Redcar & Cleveland website.

If you enjoy this material, it would be worth having a look at the Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic (ASNC) course at Cambridge (there's a film about it on the course films page).

Date posted: 

Monday 16 February 2015


Oxford and Cambridge Student Conference in Newcastle

Students in a College

Student conferences are a good opportunity to find out more from subject specialists, students and admissions staff

On 18 March 2015 there will be a free Oxford and Cambridge Student Conference in Newcastle (very close to the train station) for students in Year 12.

The conference covers courses available at Oxford and Cambridge (sessions led by subject specialists), Oxford and Cambridge Explained talks, and plenty of opportunities to chat with current students at both universities and find out what studying at Oxford and Cambridge is really like. You will need a teacher to book a ticket for you if you would like to attend - do read the information on the Oxford and Cambridge Student Conference website and ask a teacher to book your place.

Places are also available at similar conferences in Lisburn, Edinburgh, Birmingham, and Surrey.

tracking our migratory birds to Africa and back

Date posted: 

Sunday 15 February 2015


Economics essay competition


Credit: (cropped)

The Royal Economic Society runs an annual competition for students studying Economics at school, with questions based on key elements of your syllabus. 

You may find the questions set for this year's competition interesting to think about:

  • "Countries like Greece caused the Eurozone crisis by running up too much debt, so it is only fair that they should bear most of the burden of fixing it." Discuss.
  • Should the Government support manufacturing?  If so, how?
  • Should raising GDP be the primary objective of economic policy?
  • "The rising gap between rich and poor is not just bad for society, it is bad for growth." Discuss.
  • Should "fracking" be allowed? If so, who should benefit?
  • "It is immoral for the drug companies to charge large sums for drugs that are cheap to manufacture." Discuss.
  • "High saving promotes faster growth. So having  more savers in the global economy should be good for our long term prosperity."
  • "Does the economic case favour a new airport runway at Heathrow, Gatwick or elsewhere?"

You may also find it useful to look at the essay titles and winning entries from previous years (bottom of the page).

If you are studying Economics and are interested in entering an essay for this competition, do ensure that you read the full details and entry criteria on the Royal Economic Society website before you start work. The deadline for entry is Monday 30 June 2015.

Date posted: 

Thursday 12 February 2015


Antarctic glaciers

Antarctic peninsula

The Northern Antarctic Peninsula. Credit: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is a very useful and interesting website on the the science of Antarctic glaciology written by Dr Bethan Davies from Royal Holloway, University of London. Here is the introduction:

Antarctic glaciers are beautiful and awe-inspiring. They affect us through their connections with the ocean and sea level, and environmental change is having rapid consequences in Antarctica. Antarctica is the world’s largest ice sheet, covering ~14,000,000 km2. Much of the ice sheet surface lies above 3000 m above sea level. This massive thickness of ice drowns whole mountain ranges, and numerous volcanoes exist underneath the icey exterior. It’s the world’s fifth largest continent, and it is, on average, the highest and coldest continent. Antarctica also provides a unique record of the Earth’s past climate, through the geomorphological record of glacier moraines, through ice cores, through deep sea sediment cores, and through past records of sea level rise.

If you would like to find out more about this fascinating topic, do explore the website, which includes information about different types of glacier, ice shelves, and ice streams as well as the section on glaciers and climate. There is a lot of material that you'll enjoy browsing, and if you are taking A level Geography, this section helps you to find the relevant material for different parts of your course. You can also ask questions here.

Date posted: 

Thursday 12 February 2015


Sixth Form Philosophy Conference: 19 March

Question markThe Philosopher (2012). Image credit: Yau Hoong Tang

The University of Cambridge Faculty of Philosophy is holding a free one-day conference for Year 12 students.

The conference is open to those currently studying philosophy, or to those who are thinking of studying it at university. The day will consist of three lectures given by leading academic staff from the Faculty. The aim is to enrich and extend, rather than simply duplicate, the coverage of topics typically studied in school. There will also be a discussion session over buffet lunch for any teachers accompanying their students.

Places are limited, and are restricted to four students per school. Applications are now open, and must be made online by a member of school staff on behalf of their students. Applications close on 27 February ; schools will be notified of the outcome by 5 March 2015.

Date posted: 

Tuesday 10 February 2015


Chemistry and Materials Sciences at Cambridge Science Festival

Medicine at Cambridge Science Festival

Maths and Physics at Cambridge Science Festival

What's on? Public lectures at a university near you

Image credit: Marijn de Vries Hoogerwe

Universities share their latest research in public lectures, open to all, free of charge:

If you can't make it on the day, universities very often publish videos or transcripts of their public lectures on their websites after the event. For example, browse the latest uploads to the University of Cambridge's Video and Audio Service.

Date posted: 

Saturday 7 February 2015



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