Year 11

How is Britain Changing?

london central

Credit: Pedro Szekely

The competition for the Young Geographer of the Year Award provides students with the opportunity to explore geographical change from many different perspectives, at both local and national scales.

To enter, sixth form students must produce a 1500 word essay. Entries which illustrate how students have collected and used data from a variety of sources, including the collection of first-hand data through fieldwork, are encouraged. You can find full information, including details for how younger students can enter, on the entry form.

The deadline for all entries is 9:00 Friday 14 October 2016.

Date posted: 

Wednesday 15 June 2016

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What is it really like to study Economics?

What it is like to study languages?

The Charles Darwin Papers

primate skeleton in the museum of zoologyThe University's Museum of Zoology holds some specimens from Darwin's famous voyage on the Beagle

Credit: Andrew Griffin

The Charles Darwin Papers in Cambridge University Library hold nearly the entire existing collection of Darwin’s working scientific papers. Among these documents are Charles Darwin’s Evolution Manuscripts, his papers on the transmutation of species. Using these notebooks, annotations, and portfolios, Darwin wrote the nine of his fifteen books that set down, enlarged and defended the theory of evolution by natural selection. You can find the papers online at the Darwin Manuscripts Project.

The Darwin Correspondence Project also holds online resources for students, including a Darwin Timeline showing the key moments in Darwin's life and what was happening in Britain at the time, plus a series of audio clips and videos on Darwin's work. For example, the Face of Emotion series discusses Darwin’s work on expression in the context of current research in artificial intelligence, autism, and neuroscience. You can even try Darwin's Emotion Experiment for yourself here.

Date posted: 

Thursday 12 May 2016

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Inside Dyson's new engineering centre at Cambridge University

The Dyson Centre for Engineering Design opens today at Cambridge University, a new building that has been constructed with a £8m grant from the Dyson Foundation. The Centre will provide the space for 1,200 engineers to build prototypes, test, and collaborate on projects. The Centre provides:

  • Modern rapid prototyping hardware such as 3D printers, and materials for rapid 3D printing and 2D cutting
  • A range of hands‐on and interactive aids demonstrating new engineering concepts
  • Interactive apparatus to familiarise and offer experiences of engineering concepts giving students knowledge and confidence to invent and innovate their own designs and creations
  • Machine tools including lathes and milling machines
  • More equipment to come

The undergraduate space is already a hive of activity, with students creating models on the new 3D printers, using the new laser cutters, and even making their own parts in the machine tooling area. You can read more about the Centre in this article or find out about studying Engineering at King's.

Date posted: 

Monday 9 May 2016

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What is it like to be a King's mathematician?

Corridor party

A corridor party in the Keynes accommodation

We hope that you are enjoying the new accounts in the King's Student Perspectives series. We now have a new one for Maths as well - Ellen has very kindly shared her experiences as a second year Maths student at King's.

Ellen's account includes (amongst other things):

If you are interested in applying for maths and you want to find out more about STEP papers after reading this account, do have a look at our Maths page, and in particular the resources section, which has some useful links for STEP Exams.

Date posted: 

Friday 29 April 2016

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Topical news debate

Question time panel

Can you think of a recent news story that has particularly interested you or got you thinking? Or one that has caused a lot of controversy?

You might be interested in the weekly Question Time programmes on BBC 1, with topical discussion and debate chaired by David Dimbleby. This week's programme was filmed in Hull and the panellists were Conservative communities secretary Greg Clark, Labour's shadow home secretary Andy Burnham, former leader of the SNP Alex Salmond, former director of the Centre for Policy Studies Jill Kirby, and hedge fund manager and chairman of the ARK chain of academies Paul Marshall.

Who do you agree / disagree with?

International Students: unfortunately you can't access BBC iplayer outside the UK, however there is an equivalent Radio 4 programme which you should be able to access on BBC iplayer Radio called Any Questions (and Any Answers)

Date posted: 

Thursday 28 April 2016

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Free Taster Day in Latin and Classics

Latin text

Credit: Dan Diffendale

Have you ever tried learning Latin? Do you want to give it a go? The Classics Faculty is holding a Latin Taster Day on Saturday 18 June 2016 so that you can explore learning Latin for the first time, with language classes and a lecture on the Ancient World.

As the Classics course at Cambridge has a four-year option for students who are studying Latin for the first time, this is a very good opportunity to get a sense of whether Classics is for you.

All school-age students are welcome. The day is free to attend, please bring a packed lunch, and there are a limited number of hardship travel bursaries available. Please see the further information and booking.

Date posted: 

Tuesday 26 April 2016

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Shakespeare's 400th Anniversary

The Royal Shakespeare Theatre in Stratford upon avonThe Royal Shakespeare Theatre in Stratford-upon-Avon.

Credit: Phil Dolby

You may have read in the news recently that 23 April 2016 marked the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare's death.

On last week's BBC Radio 4 Saturday Live, Edward Wilson-Lee (Faculty of English) and Victoria Bartels (Faculty of History) contributed to the commemorations of the death of Shakespeare.

The BBC Shakespeare Festival has lots more TV & Radio programmes coming up, as well as articles on historical performances, and Much Ado Near Me, which features regional Shakespeare resources, including clips and articles for Newcastle, York and the Tees.

There are also upcoming events in and around London as part of Shakespeare400, a season of cultural and artistic events throughout the year celebrating Shakespeare's creative achievement and his profound influence on culture across the centuries. Events include theatre, music, opera, dance, and exhibitions. Some highlights:

Date posted: 

Sunday 24 April 2016

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What is it really like to study HSPS at King's?

Punting

The latest King's Student Perspectives piece is written by Ceylon, who is studying Human, Social and Political Sciences (HSPS) here at King's:

In her account, Ceylon writes about why she chose the course, what  the teaching is like, the workload and what she likes to do when she is not working, the social life in King's and College families, where and how she likes to do her work, and her thoughts on admissions interviews.

Date posted: 

Thursday 21 April 2016

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