Year 11

Scrambled Eggs Podcasts

podcast page

Scrambled Eggs is a series of podcasts aimed at helping Year 11 and 12 students to explore their subjects and think about what they'd like to study at University. These are ten to fifteen minute discussions with university academics, many of them professors from the University of Oxford. Here are just a few:

Click here for the full list of podcasts.

Date posted: 

Thursday 25 August 2016


The Economics of Austerity

interview with ha-joon chang

Dr Ha-Joon Chang, from Cambridge University's Faculty of Economics, interviewed with Owen Wilson recently for The Guardian. Dr Chang discusses the Conservative party's austerity programme, arguing that austerity is a ‘self-defeating strategy’ and an attempt to undermine the welfare state. The Cambridge professor also talks about inequality, asking whether the UK has ‘socialism for the rich and capitalism for the poor’. You can watch the full interview here.

Date posted: 

Wednesday 24 August 2016


What's it like to study Linguistics?

What's it like to study History?

Students in a supervision

The latest King's Student Perspectives piece is written by Joel, who has just finished his first year studying History here at King's:

In his account, Joel writes about the History course, how the teaching works, how he found the transition from school to university, and the social life in Cambridge.

Date posted: 

Monday 22 August 2016


What's it like to study Geography?


The latest King's Student Perspectives piece is written by Adam, who has just finished his first year studying Geography here at King's:

In his account, Adam writes about the Geography course, how supervisions work, how he found the application process, what he likes to do when he's not working and the social life in King's.

Date posted: 

Wednesday 17 August 2016


Science and the Olympics

simone biles

Simone Biles competing in gymnastics. Credit: Agência Brasil Fotografias

As the Olympic Games in Rio continue, there are a whole host of articles coming up in the news and in journals discussing the events - and in particular, the science behind the games.

Here are just a few we've found:

Date posted: 

Friday 12 August 2016


Shakespeare - Where to start?

shakespeare first folio

Shakespeare's First Folio. Credit: ptwo

All students studying English at Cambridge take a paper (a module) on Shakespeare in their first or second year, but it can be daunting deciding where to begin with 38 plays and over a hundred poems to be getting on with!

You might like to start by looking back at what you’ve already covered. Many students have studied at least one of Shakespeare’s Tragedies at school (Macbeth, King Lear or Hamlet might be familiar?) or one the Comedies (Much Ado about Nothing or Twelfth Night?). You may even have approached a play that fits more problematically into both of or between these categories, such as The Tempest or The Merchant of Venice.

But have you ever read, or seen performed, one of the History plays? Or read some of Shakespeare's sonnets? Reading or watching one the poems or plays you've never come across before can be a good (and fun!) place to start. You can find all of Shakespeare's works online on Open Source Shakespeare or Shakespeare Online.

And then, why not check out Radio Four’s programme on Shakespeare and Literary Criticism?

Date posted: 

Thursday 11 August 2016


What's it really like to study Human, Social and Political Sciences?

What's it like to study Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic?

Want to visit Cambridge during the summer?


Prospective students are always welcome to visit

Remember that you are welcome to visit any time, even if there's not an official open day on.

  • If you would like to look around a college, it is best to introduce yourself at the porters' lodge (the reception). Porters are normally happy for prospective students to walk around the public areas and will give you any maps / information available. There's also a map of Cambridge, which shows where the colleges are. You'll see that the middle of Cambridge is quite small, so you will be able to walk between most colleges easily.
  • If you would like to visit King's, do introduce yourself at the porters' lodge when you arrive. The college will be open to prospective students and we have a self-guided tour that you can use.
  • You may like to visit on a day when we're running an informal meeting for prospective students. Do email us with your name and the subject you are interested in if you would like to book a place one one of these meetings.
  • There are some great museums and teaching collections which you might like to explore, most of which are free to visit. Or you might like to check the 'what's on' list for the day you are visiting - there are often talks and exhibitions on, as well as the Shakespeare Festival.

Date posted: 

Wednesday 20 July 2016



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