Sciences

Antarctic glaciers

Antarctic peninsula

The Northern Antarctic Peninsula. Credit: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

AntarcticGlaciers.org is a very useful and interesting website on the the science of Antarctic glaciology written by Dr Bethan Davies from Royal Holloway, University of London. Here is the introduction:

Antarctic glaciers are beautiful and awe-inspiring. They affect us through their connections with the ocean and sea level, and environmental change is having rapid consequences in Antarctica. Antarctica is the world’s largest ice sheet, covering ~14,000,000 km2. Much of the ice sheet surface lies above 3000 m above sea level. This massive thickness of ice drowns whole mountain ranges, and numerous volcanoes exist underneath the icey exterior. It’s the world’s fifth largest continent, and it is, on average, the highest and coldest continent. Antarctica also provides a unique record of the Earth’s past climate, through the geomorphological record of glacier moraines, through ice cores, through deep sea sediment cores, and through past records of sea level rise.

If you would like to find out more about this fascinating topic, do explore the AntarcticGlaciers.org website, which includes information about different types of glacier, ice shelves, and ice streams as well as the section on glaciers and climate. There is a lot of material that you'll enjoy browsing, and if you are taking A level Geography, this section helps you to find the relevant material for different parts of your course. You can also ask questions here.

Date posted: 

Thursday 12 February 2015

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Year 10 Women in STEM Event: Friday 27 February

Lab coatsLab coats. Image credit: Upupa4me

King’s College Student Union invites Year 10 girls at UK state schools to attend a Women in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics workshop on Friday 27 February in Cambridge.

The programme has been put together by our female mathematicians, scientists, and engineers to inspire young women to continue their study of STEM subjects at A Level and beyond.

Our current students will lead small groups in hands-on sessions in Maths, Natural Sciences, and Engineering.  There will also be a panel of current students who will lead a Q&A on studying sciences and living at university.

The workshop will begin at 10am and finish by 3pm.  We ask schools to cover transport costs, but once your group arrives at King’s all parts of the visit (including a sandwich lunch) will be free of charge.

Teachers who would like to book places (up to a maximum of 30) for their Year 10 girls are asked to email Eleanor (Schools Liaison Officer) for more information.

Date posted: 

Tuesday 10 February 2015

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Chemistry and Materials Sciences at Cambridge Science Festival

Medicine at Cambridge Science Festival

Maths and Physics at Cambridge Science Festival

The Triple Helix Science in Society Review

Lego helix

Credit: Michael Knowles

The Triple Helix is one of the science societies in Cambridge. Each term, it publishes the Science in Society Review, with articles spanning a range of scientific disciplines but with a common focus on the interactions between science and society.

You may be interested to look at some of the previous issues:

If you are considering an application to study science at Cambridge, you may find Science in Society Review 6 from Lent term 2009 particularly useful: This was a special issue about Cambridge's rich history of science and discovery, produced for the University's 800th anniversary.

Would you like to get a short article published in the next issue of Science in Society Review? The society is running a science writing competition for sixth form students in the UK and will publish the winning entries. If you would like to take part, please read the competition details and submission form. The deadline for submissions is 21 February 2015.

Date posted: 

Thursday 5 February 2015

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King's Year 12 Link Area Accommodation Scheme

King's College

Credit: Shane Global (cropped)

If you go to a state school in one of the King's link areas (much of North East England and the West Berkshire area), do read about our Year 12 Link Area Accommodation Scheme. We may be able to help you to attend events in Cambridge such as a Saturday subject masterclass, a department open day, a science festival event, or any college open day by offering you free B&B accommodation in King's College the night before.

Date posted: 

Thursday 5 February 2015

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The Cambridge Science Festival programme is published

Hands-on activity

Science Saturday - a hands-on Engineering activity assisted by Cambridge undergraduates

Bookings open on Monday 9 February at 10.30am for the large 2015 Cambridge Science Festival running from 9 - 22 March 2015

There is a Cambridge Science Festival app, which you can search for on iTunes or Google Play.

Examples of talks:

  • Mon 9 March (17:30 - 18:30) - There's no business like flow business (age 15+)
    Inreasingly cells are providing us with answers. Scientists at the Babraham Institute carry out vital research on cells and cellular processes to learn how the body works and how it changes as we age. In this lecture, Rachel Walker and Becky Newman explain flow cytometry and how how it takes us a step further in understanding cells and cell populations.
    (Booking required)
  • Tues 10 March (17:00 - 18:00) - Colour, new dimensions, and the geometry of physics (age 15+)
    Professor Frank Wilczek from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is one of the leading theoretical physicists of our time. Known for his discovery of asymptotic freedom, for which he received the Nobel Prize in 2004, his research ranges across particle physics, astrophysics and condensed matter physics.
    (booking required)
  • Thurs 12 March (18:00 - 19:00) - Melioidosis:biothreat infection and paddy-field disease (age 15+)
    Professor Sharon Peacock is a clinical microbiologist in the Department of Medicine, and works closely with Public Health England and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Intitute. In this talk, Professor Peacock shows how sequencing techniques can be applied to to study of Melioidosis, an infectious disease of tropical climates.
    (booking required)
  • Fri 13  March (18:00 - 19:00) - Searching for intelligence in the legs: robots that walk, run and dance (age 15+)
    Although there is enormous success in the use of robotic arms for the automation industry, robotic legs are very challenging to be engineered and used in our daily lives. Dr Fumiya Lida discusses why legs are so special, and whether we will see robots running around in the near future.
    (booking required)

Date posted: 

Saturday 31 January 2015

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Year 11 and Year 12 Subject Taster events at Newcastle University

Newcastle University

Newcastle University. Credit: Chris Thomson

Booking is open for Newcastle University's Discover More events on Wednesday 11 March and Wednesday 25 March 2015. 

If you are in Year 11 or Year 12, these events give you an opportunity to find out more about what studying your subject at university level is like, as well as gaining insights into future career possibilities.

Please see the information on Newcastle University website (which includes a link to the application form). If you would like to request a place, you must submit your application by Friday 13 February 2015.

Date posted: 

Saturday 31 January 2015

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