Sciences

How did you choose your subject or course?

Protractors

Credit: Dean Hochman

I wouldn't say that I really chose to study Maths at any point. It was simply my best subject and the one I most enjoyed all through school, so naturally if I was going to go to university, I would apply to do maths.
- Josh, Mathematics (more from Josh)

I was ready to commit to science after enjoying it at school but wasn't ready to commit completely to physics, making the Natural Sciences Tripos perfect for me with its breadth.
- Jonny, Natural Sciences (more from Jonny)

I have been interested in people and how they think and behave since I was a small child. I had always seen it as an innate interest, and it wasn’t until I was in sixth form that I began to consider studying social sciences at university. I had never studied Psychology or any similar discipline as an academic subject before, but I realised that a lot of what I was reading, the things I chose to watch on television, and lectures, museums and events I went to had this common theme.
- Lucy, Psychological and Behavioural Sciences (more from Lucy)

Signpost

Credit: Nick Page

Having decided that I wanted to take further the skills I enjoyed learning in the sciences and maths at school,I decided that Engineering was for me as it provides a more practical and real-world approach to learning than perhaps a ‘pure’ science would. [....] What attracted me to the Cambridge Engineering course was the relatively unique course structure, allowing me to study a wide range of engineering subjects in the first two years before choosing to specialise in the final two years.
- Mark, Engineering (more from Mark)

I didn’t always want to do medicine, like many people claim. [...] But I somehow started to look into [brain surgery] in Year 11. At first, I had no idea what was involved - I thought that I could take a course in neuroscience at university and then (with some training) be allowed to be a brain surgeon! But, the more I dug into the details, the more I realised that actually, things aren’t that simple. You need a medical degree, and have years of specialist training in hospitals afterwards before you can cut up someone’s skull and probe it with various instruments. And so that’s what inspired me to study medicine. Interestingly, I no longer want to be a brain surgeon as I’ve become interested in other areas of medicine, but brain surgery is important because it is what got me into medicine to begin with.
- Shedeh, Medicine (more from Shedeh)

The idea of being able to concentrate on my studies for three years like any other undergraduate immediately appealed. Firstly I would get to further my scientific curiosity before I became a “real” medic, which I hoped would teach me to think critically about every clinical procedure I would have to do, by evaluating its relevance and importance to the scientific community. Secondly, it could also lead to a much swifter entry into research, an alternative field I had been entertaining, if I decided that this was for me.
- Anne, Medicine (more from Anne)

Date posted: 

Friday 29 January 2016

Tags: 

Reith Lectures on Black Holes (Stephen Hawking)

Each year the BBC invites leading speakers in different fields to deliver the Reith lectures, which are broadcast on Radio 4. The subject of this year's Reith Lectures is Black Holes and the speaker is Stephen Hawking. If you have not already caught them, you might enjoy the following Radio 4 broadcasts:

..and if you'd like to test your knowledge, do have a look at this quiz on black holes.

Information about accessing BBC iplayer content outside the UK: See this information and see the podcast download page.

NB. This is an example of a resource that can be accessed from lots of different places. We tag such posts with 'all locations'. If you live some way from Cambridge, clicking on the all locations page can be useful so that you filter out events in Cambridge and events in specific areas of the UK.

Date posted: 

Wednesday 27 January 2016

Tags: 

Computer Science at Cambridge Science Festival

Do browse the festival programme now. Booking opens at 10:30am on 8 February

The programme has just been published for this year's Cambridge Science Festival, which will run from Monday 7 March to Sunday 20 March. Events which may be of interest to prospective Computer Science students include both talks and activities, and the opportunity to visit some of the University's facilties. Here are some examples:

Mon 7 - Happier and healthier - smartphones (15+, booking)
Tues 8 & Wed 9 - Historical letterpress printing (15+, booking)
Wed 9 - The intersection of society and technology (15+, booking)
Thurs 10 - Turing's imitation game (15+, booking)
Sat 12 - Be a Computer (12+, booking)
Sat 12 - Alan Turing and the Enigma Machine (12+, booking)
Sat 12 - Big data: the missing link (15+, booking)
Mon 14 - Data: how can cities become smarter? (15+, booking)
Mon 14 - Back to the future: computing history (12+, booking)

Bookings for the Cambridge Science Festival open on 8 February at 10:30am. Please see the Cambridge Science Festival website.

Date posted: 

Monday 25 January 2016

Tags: 

Physics at Cambridge Science Festival

Date posted: 

Friday 22 January 2016

Tags: 

Chemistry at Cambridge Science Festival

Test tubes

Do browse the festival programme now. Booking opens at 10:30am on 8 February

The programme has just been published for this year's Cambridge Science Festival, which will run from Monday 7 March to Sunday 20 March. Events which may be of interest to prospective Chemistry students include both talks and activities, and the opportunity to visit some of the University's facilties. Here are some examples:

Mon 6 - Choral Evensong (all ages, booking)
Tue 8 - FameLab Cambridge final (15+, booking)
Tue 8 - Solar energy: past, present and future (15+, booking)
Tue 8 - SciBar Cambridge (15+, booking)
Wed 9 - Look what chemistry has done for me (15+, booking)
Thurs 10 - Climate science (15+, booking)
Thurs 10 - A sustainable future: finding your way (15+, booking)
Thurs 10 - How proteins fold, my research career. (15+, booking)
Sat 12 - Structural data and molecular design (all ages, booking)
Thurs 17 - Plants to drugs (12+, booking)

Bookings for the Cambridge Science Festival open on 8 February at 10:30am. Please see the Cambridge Science Festival website.

Date posted: 

Friday 22 January 2016

Tags: 

Biology and Medicine at the Cambridge Science Festival

Science Festival pin badges

Do browse the festival programme now. Booking opens at 10:30am on 8 February

The programme has just been published for this year's Cambridge Science Festival, which will run from Monday 7 March to Sunday 20 March. Events which may be of interest to prospective students for Biology and Medicine include both talks and activities, and the opportunity to visit some of the University's facilties. Here are some examples:

Mon 7, Tue 8, Mon 14, Wed 16 -  Parasite (15+, booking)
Mon 7 - What Darwin did next (12+, booking)
Mon 7 - Artificial intelligence vs. the human brain (15+, booking)
Tues 8 - Organ transplantation: dilemmas (15+, booking)
Wed 9 - Pregnancy as a compromise (15+, booking)
Thus 10 - What population genetics can teach us (15+, booking)
Fri 11 - The brain: how we really make decisions (15+, booking)
Sat 12 - Structural data and molecular design (all ages, drop in)
Sat 12 - What can a tiny nervous system do? (15+, booking)
Sat 12 - Your primate relatives (8+, booking)
Sat 12 & Sun 13 - Biology challenges (all ages, drop in)
Sat 12 & Sun 13 - Cells in the know (all ages, drop in)
Sun 20 - Computing in molecular and cell biology (12+ booking)
Sun 20 - A real operating room (8+, booking)
Sun 20 - Using the immune system to fight cancer (12+, booking)
Sun 20 - Making new medicines for old diseases (12+, booking)
Sun 20 - Surgical simulation techniques (12+, booking)
Sun 20 - Brain injury and new technology (15+, booking)
Sun 20 - Pregnancy, diabetes and research (15+, booking)

Bookings for the Cambridge Science Festival open on 8 February at 10:30am. Please see the Cambridge Science Festival website.

Date posted: 

Thursday 21 January 2016

Tags: 

Durham: Find out about research in Antarctica

Durham

Keep an eye out for interesting local exhibitions and events!

There are a number of exhibitions and events at Palace Green Library, Durham University on the Polar Regions, focusing particularly on the discovery, exploration and ongoing work taking place in Antarctica.

You will find full details of the following events on the Palace Green Library website.

  • Exhibition: Antarctica: Exporers, Heroes, Scientists
  • Exhibition: With Scott to the Pole
  • Exhibition: Antarctic Witness
  • Exhibition: Antarctic Science Today
Antarctic peninsula

The Northern Antarctic Peninsula. Credit: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

As well as visiting the exhibitions, do take the opportunity to talk to scientists from Durham University's Department of Geography about research in Antarctica  and ask any questions that you have about what current research is happening and why this is important for our understanding of climate change - they will be available every Saturday at the 'Ask a Scientist' events (next event: Saturday 23 January 12 noon until 3pm).

There is also a talk on Antarctic Exploration on Wednesday 27 January 2016, using the Royal Geographical Society archives. NB. If you would like to find out about using archives in academic research, you may find the King's Introduction to Archives useful to look at in advance of this talk.

Date posted: 

Thursday 21 January 2016

Tags: 

Year 12 Summer Schools

Bodley's Court lawn

Applications are open for the Year 12 Sutton Trust Summer Schools in Cambridge! These are very popular subject-specific residentials in July and August for eligible students in Year 12 (or equivalent) at state-maintained schools in the UK.  The programme includes lectures, seminars, discussion groups, practical work and social activities, as well as the opportunity to meet current staff and students and to live in a Cambridge College. The residentials are free of charge.

The Sutton Trust Summer Schools provide a very useful insight into what it is like to study at Cambridge so do apply for a place if you are curious to find out about studying at Cambridge and don't have much information about this already. Equally, please be aware that we receive far more applications than we have places available. It is important to read:

For full information and booking, please go to the Cambridge Admissions website. The application deadline is 11 March 2016. Good luck!

In more general terms, you may also find the King's page about applying with limited support or advice helpful.

Date posted: 

Monday 18 January 2016

Tags: 

Oxford and Cambridge Year 12 Student Conferences around the UK

Students in a College

Student conferences are a good opportunity to find out more from subject specialists, students and admissions staff

Bookings are open for the 2016 Oxford and Cambridge Student Conferences, which will take place in Swansea, Birmingham, Merseyside, Newcastle, Lisburn, Edinburgh and Surrey during March.

The conference covers courses available at Oxford and Cambridge (sessions led by subject specialists), Applying to Oxford and Cambridge (including student life) talks, and plenty of opportunities to chat with current students and admissions staff at both universities and find out what studying at Oxford and Cambridge is really like. You will need a teacher to book a ticket for you if you would like to attend - do read the information on the Oxford and Cambridge Student Conference website and ask a teacher to book your place (see the links to the different events on the right-hand side of the webpage linked above).

tracking our migratory birds to Africa and back

Date posted: 

Tuesday 5 January 2016

Tags: 

Subject Masterclasses

students outside the faculty of classics Students outside the Faculty of Classics

Subject Masterclasses provide academically-able Year 12 students with the opportunity to explore subjects they are interested in studying at university and may not have previously experienced. Each event includes two lectures, an introduction to the admissions process, and the chance to hear about student life from current undergraduates.

A range of subjects are offered each year, currently bookings are open for February 2016 Masterclasses in:

 

  • Archaeology: Saturday 06 February 2016
  • Genetics and Biochemistry : Saturday 06 February 2016
  • Physics: Saturday 06 February 2016
  • Theology and Philosophy: Saturday 06 February 2016
  • Architecture: Saturday 27 February 2016
  • Classics: Saturday 27 February 2016
  • English: Saturday 27 February 2016

Please be aware there are only a limited number of spaces available so we advise students to book their places quickly. Masterclasses are continually added throughout the year so please register your interest for future events on the Masterclass website.

Date posted: 

Sunday 3 January 2016

Tags: 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Sciences