Sciences

Oxford Physics events in October 2017

CASSINI-HUYGENS: SPACE ODYSSEY TO SATURN AND TITAN
When: Wednesday 11th October 2017, 17:30-19:00pm
Where: Oxford Physics Department
What: Talk and Q&A

Credit: The University of Oxford Department of Physics

Come and hear the incredible story of Cassini-Huygens as presented by Professor David Southwood (former head of the European Space Agency). During its time in space it has revolutionised our understanding of Saturn and made astonishing discoveries. More information and booking can be found on our events page. The event is organised by the Oxford University Aeronautical Society (AerOx).

 

AN EVENING OF QUANTUM DISCOVERY
When: Tuesday 17th Oct 2017 (5pm - 6.30pm: Family friendly and 6.30pm – 8.30pm: General Public (Age 12+))
Where: Oxford Physics Department
What: A showcase of quantum research at Oxford with talks, hands-on stalls and lab tours

Credit: The University of Oxford Department of Physics

Hear about the exciting new research and innovative technology development being done at Oxford University. Discover how Quantum Physics impacts on your everyday life, now and in the near future. More information and booking can be found on our events page.

 

AN EVENING OF QUANTUM DISCOVERY
When: Tuesday 17th Oct 2017 (5pm - 6.30pm: Family friendly and 6.30pm – 8.30pm: General Public (Age 12+))
Where: Oxford Physics Department
What: A showcase of quantum research at Oxford with talks, hands-on stalls and lab tours

Credit: The University of Oxford Department of Physics

Hear about the exciting new research and innovative technology development being done at Oxford University. Discover how Quantum Physics impacts on your everyday life, now and in the near future. More information and booking can be found on our events page.

Date posted: 

Thursday 5 October 2017

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Specimen papers for pre-interview admissions assessments

Note saying 'Register before you apply'

Your school will normally register you.

If you're applying to Cambridge this year then you may have a pre-interview admissions assessment at your school or test centre on 2 November - it depends what course you are applying for.

Information is available on the admissions assessment page, and specimen papers are available if you would like to practice.

Important: Don't forget to make sure that you're registered in time! The registration deadline was 1 October (at 17:00 UK time) if you're applying for Medicine or 15 October (at 18:00 UK time) if you're applying for another subject that requires a pre-interview assessment.

Date posted: 

Wednesday 4 October 2017

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Hot air balloon problem

Hot air balloon

Credit: Brent Myers

A hot air balloon of mass 350 kg is carrying 5 people each of mass 70kg. The total volume of the baloon is 2800m3.

The balloon flies horizontally in dry air 1km above sea level. The atmopheric pressure at this altitude is 89.9kPa and the surrounding temperature is 9ºC. Given that the molar mass of dry air is 28.97g/mol, work out the temperature of the heated air inside the balloon. (You can take gas constant R=8.31J/mol K and you may assume that air behaves as an ideal gas).

General and problem-specific hints are available.

This is one of the problems on I-want-to-study-engineering.org, a resource from Cambridge University Engineering Department with more than 200 problems to help you to practice problem solving skills relevant to Engineering. The website also provides general advice such as how to get onto a good Engineering course (whether at Cambridge or elsewhere).

Date posted: 

Monday 12 June 2017

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What is it really like to study Engineering?

STEP Mathematics resources

Graph

Credit: Electric-Eye

Cambridge University has a free online STEP Mathematics course designed for students preparing to take STEP papers (STEP exams are required if you are applying for Mathematics or Computer Science with Mathematics at King's).

The course has online modules for individual study, which are open to everyone.

STEP is very important because it helps you to make the transition from school maths to the kinds of matheamtical thinking that you will do at Cambridge. 

More about STEP.

Date posted: 

Tuesday 16 May 2017

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Booking open for Maths Open Day on Saturday 6 May 2017

Students at an Open Day

Tour of King's with a current student

Students in Y12 who are interested in studying Mathematics at University have the great opportinity to visit the Maths Open Day at King's on 6 May 2017! Prospective mathematics students arrive for a talk and Q&A with a King's academic in Mathematics starting at 12:00 noon. Afterwards there will be a chance to meet a current King's undergraduate studying Maths, who will give you a tour of King's College then take you from King's to the Centre for Mathematical Studies (outside King's) for the Mathematics Faculty Open Afternoon (a series of taster lectures and information about STEP). The event ends at 16:50.

If you would like to attend, you need to complete two booking forms:

Date posted: 

Wednesday 12 April 2017

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Cambridge Science Festival 2017

Poster for the cambridge science festival

It's nearly time for this year's Cambridge Science Festival, which will run from 13 - 16 March 2017.

The Science Festival provides the public with opportunities to explore and discuss issues of scientific interest and concern and to raise aspirations by encouraging young people to consider a career in science, technology, engineering or mathematics. Over 170 event coordinators organise talks, interactive demonstrations, hands-on activities, film showings and debates with the assistance of around 1,000 staff and students from departments and organisations across the University and research institutions, charities and industry in the eastern region.

You can read more, download the programme or search events online on the Festival website.

Date posted: 

Thursday 23 February 2017

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What can an engineer learn from biology?

Ant hill

Credit: Elroy Serrao

That's the question Prof Jon Timmis from the University of York is going to ask in his lecture at 7.30pm on 28 Februray 2017.

His talk is part of a mini-series of lectures on Engineering in the 2017 lecture programme and will explore the exciting interaction between biology and engineering. Prof Timmis will discuss how ants can be inspiration for the design of “swarm” robotic systems, how the protection afforded by the immune system can be used to inspire the creation of self-healing robots and how the evolutionary process can be used to potentially inspire the design of self-sustaining, robotic systems.

So whether you are interested in Biology, Engineering or even Medicine and Philosophy, this talk might be an interesting way to see what lies beyond the boarders of one specific subject.

For more information visit the Yorkshire philosophical society website.

Date posted: 

Thursday 2 February 2017

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