Literature and Languages

University of Hull's OpenCampus Programme

Joseph Hillier, Moving Matters (2007), displayed outside the Logistics Institute, Hull University Business School. Image credit: Gnomonic.

It's a new term at the University of Hull's OpenCampus programme:

  • There is a new series of Tea-Time Talks, focusing on health and wellbeing, held on Tuesday evenings from 6.15pm to 7.45pm. The series will kick off with a talk by Professor Andrew L. Clark, Chair of Clinical Cardiology at Hull York Medical School, on 'The world's number one killer: "can you save yourselves?"' on Tuesday 5 May.
  • The Culture Café will be celebrating postgraduate and postdoctoral research emerging from the Department of English on Wednesdays from 2pm to 4.30pm. In the first session, Emma Butcher will explore the Brontës' childhood writings on Wednesday 6 May. 

Places are limited, so booking is essential. You can register online, or call Nicola Sharp or Jackie McAndrew on 01482 466321 / 466585.

Date posted: 

Tuesday 21 April 2015

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Introduction to Archives Workshop for Sixth Formers at King's

Kennesaw State University ArchivesKennesaw State University Archives. Image credit: Anne G

  • Are you currently taking AS / A Level History or English Literature?
  • Are you interested in finding out about and using archives in your work?

If so, King's College Archive Centre invites you to an Introduction to Archives Workshop on Friday 10 April, using the papers of Rupert Brooke.

Peter Monteith, an archivist at King's College, will explore approaches to using archives for research with you. You will then gain experience of archives, through an exploration of the life, poetry, and myth surrounding King's student and First World War poet Rupert Brooke.

The workshop will equip you to use the King's College Archive Centre yourself, either during an optional reading room session on the morning of Saturday 11 April (numbers limited) or at another time during the Centre's normal opening hours.

See the programme for the workshop and email us now at undergraduate.admissions@kings.cam.ac.uk to book a place. 

NB. Are you at a state school in one of the areas listed below? If so, please do request accommodation through the Year 12 Link Area Accommodation Scheme at King's for this or any other event advertised on the Cambridge page!

Date posted: 

Monday 23 March 2015

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Year 12 Subject Days at Emmanuel College, Cambridge

Duck, Emmanuel College, CambridgeDuck, Emmanuel College, Cambridge. Image credit: mira66

Emmanuel College, Cambridge is holding two Subject Taster Days for Year 12 students over the Easter vacation:

  • East Asian Studies Taster Day on Friday 17 April
  • English Taster Day on Saturday 18 April

As well as providing information about these Cambridge courses, the events will give students an opportunity to ask questions and speak to University Lecturers, College Tutors and current undergraduates. The events are free to attend and lunch will be provided. Students are welcome to attend this event unaccompanied. For more information and to book a place, please see the Emmanuel College website.

Date posted: 

Monday 2 March 2015

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Hwæt! Beowulf

An annotated copy of BeowulfA close reading of Beowulf. Image credit: Crossett Library

Hwæt! We Gar-Dena in gear-dagum, þeod-cyninga,  þrym gefrunon, hu ða æþelingas  ellen fremedon!

(Arguably translated into modern English as "Listen! We have heard of the might of the Kings.")

Are you interested in early languages? Beowulf is the longest epic poem in Old English, the language spoken in Anglo-Saxon England before the Norman Conquest. More than 3,000 lines long, Beowulf relates the exploits of its eponymous hero, and his successive battles with monsters.

You can study Beowulf, among other Old English texts, as part of our Anglo-Saxon Norse and Celtic degree course, which centres on early and Medieval languges and history.

Bookings are now open for the Anglo-Saxon Norse and Celtic Year 12 masterclass on 21 March.  The next Anglo-Saxon Norse and Celtic departmental Open Day will take place on 24 June 2015.

Date posted: 

Sunday 1 March 2015

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York Literature Festival (19 - 29 March)

Poetry books

Credit: Jameson Fink

If you live in or near York, do look at the programme for the 2015 York Literature Festival to see if there are events that you'd like to attend.

It's important to plan ahead because some events require you to book in advance. In some cases you may want to look at some of the material that will be discussed as well!  Here is a selection of what is on:

  • 19 March - How the Tories took Britain to the Brink
  • 20 March - Coalition past and future
  • 22 March - York's Place in History
  • 23 March - Ovid's Heroines
  • 24 March - Poetry reading: Jon Siddique and Tim Liardet
  • 25 March - How the Edwardians (almost) invented children's literature
  • 25 March - Civial War and Aftermath
  • 26 March - Virginia Woolf: One Hundred Years On
  • 26 March - Thomas Cromwell: Henry VII's right hand man
  • 26 March - Crime and Detective Work in the Roman Empire
  • 27 March - Creative and Critical Writing
  • 27 March - Watching Prime Ministers
  • 29 March - The Bletchley Girls: Women & Code breaking in WWII

For full information, please see the York Literature Festival website.

Date posted: 

Thursday 26 February 2015

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Converse: the literature website

Chaucher's The Canterbury Tales... on KindleChaucher's The Canterbury Tales in a modern age. Image credit: david_jones

Would you like to broaden and deepen your experience of literature, perhaps with the thought of studying English at university?

Try the Converse website, which is packed full of resources developed by the University of Cambridge's English Faculty in collaboration with teachers and schools.

You'll find resources to support you in your GCSE studies, your A Level studies, or in researching and making an application to study English or a related discipline at university.

Date posted: 

Tuesday 24 February 2015

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Languages and Linguistics Open Day - Fri 13 March

Linguistics noticeboard

The Cambridge languages and linguistics courses are very broad, and you can tailor them to your interests.

The Languages and Linguistics Open Days on Friday 13 March are amongst the best opportunities to find out more about studying Modern and Medieval Languages, Linguistics, or Asian and Middle Eastern Studies at Cambridge University. 

You can go to sample lectures, talks on learning a language from scratch and the Year Abroad, chat with lecturers, current students and staff from the Language Centre, visit the Linguistics Labs for Phonetics and Psycholinguistics, as well as the Faculty Library, and have lunch at one of the Colleges (we'll take you there and back).

For details and to book at place, do see the website here for the Modern and Medieval Languages and Linguistics Open Day. The Asian and Middle Eastern Studies Open Day is available to book here.

NB. Are you at a state school in one of the areas listed below? If so, do feel free to request accommodation through the Link Area Accommodation Scheme at King's for this or any other event advertised on the Cambridge page!

Date posted: 

Friday 20 February 2015

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The centenary of Arthur Miller's birth

The Crucible

The Crucible film starring Daniel Day-Lewis and Winona Ryder. Credit: Karen

2015 is the centenary of Arthur Miller's birth. Have you read or seen any of his plays? How would you characterise his work? There are lots of opportunities to see them this year!

Here is a list of Arthur Miller plays and some examples of both professional and amateur productions (hint: if you look out for amateur productions, these are often much cheaper to attend and regularly very high quality):

Resources and reading suggestions:

Date posted: 

Tuesday 17 February 2015

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Oxford and Cambridge Student Conference in Newcastle

Students in a College

Student conferences are a good opportunity to find out more from subject specialists, students and admissions staff

On 18 March 2015 there will be a free Oxford and Cambridge Student Conference in Newcastle (very close to the train station) for students in Year 12.

The conference covers courses available at Oxford and Cambridge (sessions led by subject specialists), Oxford and Cambridge Explained talks, and plenty of opportunities to chat with current students at both universities and find out what studying at Oxford and Cambridge is really like. You will need a teacher to book a ticket for you if you would like to attend - do read the information on the Oxford and Cambridge Student Conference website and ask a teacher to book your place.

Places are also available at similar conferences in Lisburn, Edinburgh, Birmingham, and Surrey.

tracking our migratory birds to Africa and back

Date posted: 

Sunday 15 February 2015

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