Humanities

Faith and religion at the Cambridge Festival of Ideas

Festival of ideas banners

Download the programme

The Cambridge Festival of Ideas is a full programme of mostly free events encouraging you to explore the arts, humanities and social sciences, meet academics and students, and engage with the University.

If you are interested in faith and religion, you might enjoy some of the following events:

Date posted: 

Tuesday 15 September 2015

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Humanities at the Cambridge Festival of Ideas

Festival of ideas programme

Download the programme

The Cambridge Festival of Ideas is a full programme of mostly free events encouraging you to explore the arts, humanities and social sciences, meet academics and students, and engage with the University.

Since humans have been able, we have used philosophy, literature, religion, art, music, history and language to understand and record our world. If you are interested in the study of how people process and document the human experience, you might enjoy the following events:

Date posted: 

Tuesday 15 September 2015

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Considering Shostakovich: String Quartet No. 8

Lecture

In many of the courses taught at Cambridge, the Faculty lectures you attend are designed to open up and expand your critical perspective on the topics you are studying, as well as furthering your factual knowledge. You can then explore ideas and specific examples further in your reading and thinking, and through writing your weekly essays, then discussing them with your supervisors (see how you are taught).

As an example, three Cambridge lecturers in Music have written about one of the most famous twentieth-century chamber works from three very different angles.

Why not listen to Dmitri Shostakovich's Eighth Quartet (1960) and read:

  • A historical perspective
    by Prof Marina Frolova-Walker
  • An analytical perspective
    by Prof Nick Marston
  • A performance-related perspective
    by Prof John Rink

These can be found in the Music Faculty's Music@Cambridge Magazine Schools Edition (Michaelams 2015), pages 35-37.

Date posted: 

Saturday 12 September 2015

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Free and Discounted Theatre Tickets

Theatre stalls looking up at the stage Many theatres across the country will offer a small discount off ticket prices for students. But did you know that there are also some free membership schemes for students and under 26s that offer an even greater discount, and in some cases free theatre tickets? Here are just a few theatres and schemes:

Or if opera is more your thing (or just something you're curious about!), Opera North have a membership scheme for under-30s that offers free or £10 tickets to select performances.

There are, of course, many more theatres with amazing student discounts so check out what's on offer at your local theatre.

Image: Matthew Paulson

Date posted: 

Monday 7 September 2015

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Year 12 Classics events in September

Classics group

Do you think that you would enjoy studying the Ancient World? Do read about Why Classics Matters and perhaps watch some of the films on the course website.

Jack says: It was the breadth of the Classics course at Cambridge that appealed to me, as it offered an opportunity to concentrate on areas of particular interest while still covering a huge range of academic disciplines and topics. Amber writes: I was always interested in literature and languages growing up. [...] I considered applying for English or Modern Languages at university, but eventually settled on Classics, and I’m very glad I did – I’ve really enjoyed the course. Read more about Jack and Amber's experiences of studying Classics.

Why not book a place on one of the Classics events in September to find out more?

....and don't forget: you don't need to have studied Latin or Greek before to apply! We have a four year course option as well as the three year course, so you can start from scratch if you like. 

Date posted: 

Wednesday 2 September 2015

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Year 12 Pathways to Law

Law books

Find out about Cambridge Law on the course website.

Do you think that you'd like to study Law at university? If you're just starting Year 12, you're from any of the areas below, and you're either eligible for free school meals or don't have any family members who have been to university, do read the information about the Pathways to Law programme in partnership with your local university. The application deadline is 28 September.

Partner universities and areas you can apply from:

  • University of Bristol: Addresses within an hour’s drive of Bristol.
  • University of Essex: Schools and colleges with low rates of progression to university in the county of Essex and into the neighbouring town of Ipswich.
  • University of Exeter: Schools and colleges in Devon, Cornwall, Somerset and Dorset (postcodes EX, TQ, PL, TR, TA, DT) only
  • University of Leeds: Schools and colleges in Yorkshire.
  • London programme (UCL and LSE): Eligible students who live in, or attend a state school in, one of the 32 London boroughs.
  • University of Manchester: Greater Manchester and Cheshire.
  • Nottingham programme (Nottingham and Nottingham Trent): Schools with low rates of progression to university who are within 1 hour's travelling distance from the city of Nottingham.
  • University of Oxford: Eligible students who live in Oxfordshire, Swindon, Berkshire and Buckinghamshire only.
  • University of Southampton: Schools with low rates of progression to university in Hampshire, the Isle of Wight and selected areas of Dorset and Surrey.
  • University of Warwick: Schools and colleges across the West Midlands.

NB. If people around you don't know much about applying to Cambridge University, do also have a look at our page for students applying with limited support and advice.

Date posted: 

Friday 28 August 2015

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Manchester & London: opportunity to sign up for Year 12 Music+

Sheet music

Credit: dalcrose (cropped)

Are you about to start an A level / IB Higher Level / equivalent Music course at a state school or college in or near Manchester or London? Do you think that you might want to study Music at university level later on?

There will be a series of Year 12 twilight extension classes in Music taught by experienced teachers and Cambridge academics during the autumn spring terms, followed by a residential visit to Cambridge in mid-March 2016.

Interested? Do read the full information on the Music Faculty website and make sure that you register by Friday 25 September 2015. It's free!

Date posted: 

Thursday 27 August 2015

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Undergraduate dissertations

For quite a few of the essay courses at Cambridge, there are opportunities to work on a dissertation. This would normally be in the later years, and sometimes you can choose to write a dissertation to replace one of your exam papers (see the structure of your chosen course). As Fiona, one of our History students says, 'it’s a good way to spend time studying something that you’re particularly interested in, and to research material which has hardly been studied before'. Many students enjoy researching and writing their dissertation so much that they decide to go on to further research after their degree, and they apply for Masters and PhD courses.

Christ's College has produced a very interesting resource with accounts of what some current undergraduates are studying for their dissertations. Do visit their website to find out more:

Date posted: 

Thursday 27 August 2015

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King's students write about a typical day

Student with an inflatable boat

Do you want to know what it's like to be a student at King's? King's College Student Union (KCSU) is keen to help you out - they are collecting short accounts written by current students of what it is like to study here. Do look at A Day In The Life Of.... and click on the subject you're most interested in, or start with Scott's general description of life as a fresher.

Did you find this useful? Then do also look a our King's Student Perspectives section for more student writing.

Date posted: 

Tuesday 25 August 2015

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What else might be waiting to be discovered?

Statue of Robin Hood with his bowToni Bray - Robin and his Bow

You might have read recently about a discovery by a PhD student at Leeds Trinity University which reveals a darker side to Robin Hood’s reputation in the eighteenth-century. Stephen Basdeo found the long forgotten work, Little John's Answer to Robin Hood and the Duke of Lancaster (1727), in the Special Collections of the Brotherton Library at the University of Leeds after reading a footnote referring to the ballad, which had previously been assumed to be a plagiarism of a known work. The ballad is a satire of the first Prime Minister, Robert Walpole (1676-1745), in which the Duke of Lancaster attempts to expose Robin Hood’s corruption to King John. Stephen puts his discovery in context: “our favourite outlaw hero really emerges with a tarnished reputation in the text. He is not noble or gallant but simply a 'thief,' a 'vast cunning man,' who 'abuses his good king.'” This discovery shows that the famous outlaw was not always as popular with people in the past as he is today – and it has remained unchecked and unanalysed all these years!

There may well be Special Collections near you, either in your town library, a nearby university library, or connected to a local museum or heritage site.

King’s College Library has its own Special Collections, as well as the Archive Centre which offers an online introduction to archival research.

Date posted: 

Thursday 20 August 2015

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