Humanities

Slavery: Past and Present

Anti-Slavery Graffiti by Paul Don Smith

Street art by Paul Don Smith. Credit: MsSaraKelly

The Queen's Speech last week included the announcement of a Modern Slavery Bill, which promises to strengthen the prosecution of  human traffickers and improve the protection of victims.

The University of Hull's Wilberforce Institute for the study of Slavery and Emancipation hosts research into both historical forms of slavery and contemporary forms of enslavement. You can watch Prof. Catherine Hall (UCL) deliver the Institute's Annual Alderman Sydney Smith Lecture on 'Re-thinking the Legacies of Slavery.'

Hull Museums have extensive collections celebrating the work of local son and anti-slavery campaigner William Wilberforce (1759 - 1833). You can visit Wilberforce House Museum to see the collections for yourself.

Liverpool is home to the International Slavery Museum.

M Shed in Bristol reflects on the city's role in the slave trade. You can visit the museum, or browse its Transatlantic Slave Trade collection online.

The University of Cambridge offers some resources for the study of slavery here.

Anti-Slavery Day is on Saturday 18 October this year. How will you mark it?

Date posted: 

Wednesday 11 June 2014

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Free Taster Day in Latin and Classics - Saturday 21 June

Credit: Giovanni

If you're considering an application for Classics at Cambridge and you've never studied Latin at school or college, we invite you to book a place on a free taster day in Cambridge on Saturday 21 June. Fifty travel bursaries of up to £50.00 are available on a first come, first served basis.

Please see the Classics Faculty website and further information for details of the event and how to book your place.

Date posted: 

Tuesday 10 June 2014

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Fantasy GCSE Set Texts

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Credit: tonynetone

What set texts did you read for your GCSE English Literature?

In the Guardian this weekend, authors chose the set texts they would like GCSE students to read.  Cambridge Classicist Mary Beard took the opportunity to 'bring in the classical world by the back door, via some great works of English literature.' She set William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar (1599); Robert Graves, I Claudius (1934); Chrisopher Logue, War Music (1959 - 2011); and Carol Ann Duffy, The World's Wife (1999).

  • Which texts would you set GCSE students?
  • In making your choice, what is the most important consideration?  Introducing students to classic works, or engaging their interests?  Representing a range of literary genres and periods, or promoting particular approaches and topics?  Capturing the national heritage, or celebrating cultural diversity?

Date posted: 

Monday 9 June 2014

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