Humanities

Michelangelo History of Art Lecture

Jean Michel Massing with students

Jean Michel Massing (History of Art academic at King's) in discussion with students at a garden party

On 17 January 2017, there will be a History of Art lecture on Michelangelo in Middleton Hall at the University of Hull.

Hugo Chapman (Keeper of Prints and Drawings at the British Museum) will explore how Michelangelo used drawings. If you live in or near Hull, why not go along and find out more, as well as getting a sense of what kinds of things historians of art can study.

Did you know that you don't have to be stuyding Art History at school to apply for History of Art at university? It's a degree for people who look at things and enjoy thinking about how they look. So if you notice things around you and like visiting museums and galleries and thinking about the objects you see, do consider the subject when you're looking at university courses!

If you want to find out more about studying History of Art at Cambridge, do look out for the materclasses later in the year. You might also enjoy Louis's student account.

Posted: 1 November 2016

Plenty of places still available for King's open afternoon next Tuesday

open day group

We still have plenty of places available for the King's open afternoon next Tuesday (20 September). This event is for students who will be applying to Cambridge this October.  Please see our open days page for further details and to book a place. This is an opportunity for you to get to know the college a little better. There will be a talk, subject sessions, the chance to chat to current King's students and a tour of the college.

Posted: 14 September 2016

Specimen papers for pre-interview admissions assessments

Note saying 'Register before you apply'

Your school will normally register you.

If you're applying to Cambridge this year then you may have a pre-interview admissions assessment at your school or test centre on 2 November - it depends what course you are applying for.

Information is available on the admissions assessment page, and specimen papers are available if you would like to practice.

Important: Don't forget to make sure that you're registered in time! The registration deadline is 1 October (at 17:00 UK time) if you're applying for Medicine or 15 October (at 18:00 UK time) if you're applying for another subject that requires a pre-interview assessment.

Posted: 14 September 2016

What's it really like to study History?

Abdulla

The latest King's student perspectives piece is written by Abdulla, who has just finished his first year studying History here at King's.

King's Student Perspectives: History

It includes topics such as:

For more student perspectives written by students studying a range of subjects, see the King's Student Perspectives page.

Posted: 25 August 2016

Emmanuel College Law Residential

emmanuel college

Credit: Henry Hemming

Emmanuel College, Cambridge, will be hosting a one night Law school for Year 13 students in state maintained schools who are considering applying for Law at Cambridge and other Russell Group universities. The residential will take place from  27 - 28 September 2016.

The programme includes an introduction to studying Law at university, two Law lectures, and application workshops.

The deadline for applications is 3pm on Thursday 15 September.

Posted: 23 August 2016

What's it like to study History?

Students in a supervision

The latest King's Student Perspectives piece is written by Joel, who has just finished his first year studying History here at King's:

In his account, Joel writes about the History course, how the teaching works, how he found the transition from school to university, and the social life in Cambridge.

Posted: 22 August 2016

What's it really like to study Human, Social and Political Sciences?

Posted: 22 July 2016

What's it like to study Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic?

Posted: 21 July 2016

Examples of historical writing

Student in Chetwynd Court

Reading in Chetwynd Court

Are you interested in applying for one of the History degrees this October? Remember that the application process is not only about grades! We will be looking for students who have developed their interests in History and have the potential to succeed in this subject at Cambridge.

There is no set reading for History, History and Politics or History and Modern Languages. You may have already found material that you are enjoying, however if you are not sure what to read (where to start?) and are looking for some specific History material to look at over the summer, we hope that these examples of historical writing will be useful.

Posted: 27 June 2016

Selwyn College Summer School 2016

selwyn college

School students attending a science talk in Selwyn College

Selwyn College will be running a Summer School for year 12 students (or equivalent) for both the Arts/Humanities and Sciences from 8 – 12 August 2016.

Students stay in undergraduate accommodation for 4 nights and experience undergraduate life by attending lectures and practicals led by university academics, and also through social activities put on by the college. In previous years, the summer school has been solely for those interested in the sciences, however this year it will be expanding to cover both the arts and sciences. The event allows students to discover more about what it is like to study at University, particularly the University of Cambridge, and their course of interest, whilst experiencing student life. The Summer School is free of charge, including meals and accommodation. Travel grants are also available on a means tested basis.

The deadline for applications is 29 June 2016. Please see the full information for eligibility criteria.

Posted: 21 June 2016

St John's Archaeology Summer School

Anubis headDiscover Egyptology at St John's Archaeology Summer School Credit: Son of Groucho

St John's College is hosting a 4-day residential Archaeology summer school from the 25-28 July for current Year 12 students. This will be an exciting opportunity to discover both the academic and practical basis of Archaeology as a University subject at Cambridge. It will include sample lectures and tutorials, workshops, and excavation. Topics will reflect the breadth of the Cambridge Archaeology degree, which also offers tracks in Egyptology, Assyriology, and Biological Anthropology.

As a subject which uniquely spans the Arts and the Sciences, Archaeology is suitable for students with a broad range of A level subjects.  Participants are not required to be doing Archaeology A level, and the content of the summer school will presume no previous knowledge. There will also be guidance on admissions and interviews.

The summer school is absolutely free to attend. Further details are available on the St John's website. The deadline for applications is 15 June.

Posted: 31 May 2016

Power, War and Conflict Global Issues Day

Are you in year 12 and thinking about applying to Cambridge? Not sure what subject you want to take? Interested in how power is created or how people are affected by war? St John's College is running a Year 12 Power, War and Conflict Global Issues Day on the 17 June. This will be a cross displinary introduction to the theme of 'Power, War and Conflict' and will feature lectures from a variety of different subject backgrounds.

The programme for the day will include a chance to experience lectures from academics at St John's College, as well as supervision style teaching. There will also be the chance to meet current students and hear about making a competitive application to Cambridge.

The closing date for applications is 6 June.

Posted: 24 May 2016

University of York Subject Conferences

heslington hall university of yorkHeslington Hall, University of York

Credit: John Robinson

The University of York have several Subject Conferences scheduled for June and July this year. These events give Year 12 and mature students the chance to explore a particular subject in depth and have a taste of what university level study is like. The days include lectures, some practical workshops, a campus tour and the opportunity to talk to staff and current students.

13 June 2016 -  Philosophy - includes a keynote talk from leading academic Owen Hulatt, lectures from research academics in the Department of Philosophy, seminar sessions and an optional campus tour. Deadline for applications: Monday 6 June 2016

22 June 2016 - Psychology - an exciting look at the mind, brain, and behaviour. It includes taster lectures on current research, hands-on practicals and demonstrations, as well as the chance to speak with current students about their experience as undergraduates. Booking required, limited places.

6 July 2016 - Chemistry - includes a keynote lecture by a member of academic research staff from the Department of Chemistry, a tour of spectroscopic techniques, molecular modelling workshop, lab activities, advice on applications, and an optional campus tour. Deadline for applications: 27 June 2016

Posted: 13 May 2016

Subject tasters at Cambridge including an overnight stay

Trinity College

The Wren Library at Trinity College

Are you in Year 12? Do you want to attend subject taster events but struggle because you live some way from Cambridge? Some Cambridge Colleges offer taster events including an overnight stay, which will be very helpful if you want to find out more about what studying your chosen course will be like. There is no obligation to apply to the College organising the event (though you are welcome to if you want to).

All of the following residentials are free of charge, including accommodation and all meals. Do read the full information and check for eligibility criteria before making an application:

At Corpus Christi College:

At Trinity College:

Booking for all events below closes on 23 May. It's an extended deadline - please ignore the part on the page where it says that booking has closed. You'll see the extended deadline on the application form.

Posted: 5 May 2016

Selwyn College Arts and Humanities Taster Day 2016

Selwyn College will be hosting an interdiscipinary taster day for year 12's (or equivalent) interested in the arts and humanities on 29 June 2016.

Come and see what it’s like to study Art History, History, Italian, Archaeology, Anthropology, Film, and Linguistics at the University of Cambridge. At this Arts and Humanities Taster Day themed around Italy, you will travel (virtually) through the peninsula with University of Cambridge scholars as your guides. The day will involve a number of lectures, discussions, and an interactive session in one of the University of Cambridge’s museums.

Applicants must; be in year 12 (or equivalent), attend a state school or college, and be on track to achieve results that make them a competetive Oxbridge applicant. Please book a place on this event, the closing date for applications is Wednesday 25 May 2016.

Posted: 4 May 2016

Topical news debate

Question time panel

Can you think of a recent news story that has particularly interested you or got you thinking? Or one that has caused a lot of controversy?

You might be interested in the weekly Question Time programmes on BBC 1, with topical discussion and debate chaired by David Dimbleby. This week's programme was filmed in Hull and the panellists were Conservative communities secretary Greg Clark, Labour's shadow home secretary Andy Burnham, former leader of the SNP Alex Salmond, former director of the Centre for Policy Studies Jill Kirby, and hedge fund manager and chairman of the ARK chain of academies Paul Marshall.

Who do you agree / disagree with?

International Students: unfortunately you can't access BBC iplayer outside the UK, however there is an equivalent Radio 4 programme which you should be able to access on BBC iplayer Radio called Any Questions (and Any Answers)

Posted: 28 April 2016

Free Taster Day in Latin and Classics

Latin text

Credit: Dan Diffendale

Have you ever tried learning Latin? Do you want to give it a go? The Classics Faculty is holding a Latin Taster Day on Saturday 18 June 2016 so that you can explore learning Latin for the first time, with language classes and a lecture on the Ancient World.

As the Classics course at Cambridge has a four-year option for students who are studying Latin for the first time, this is a very good opportunity to get a sense of whether Classics is for you.

All school-age students are welcome. The day is free to attend, please bring a packed lunch, and there are a limited number of hardship travel bursaries available. Please see the further information and booking.

Posted: 26 April 2016

What is it really like to study HSPS at King's?

Punting

The latest King's Student Perspectives piece is written by Ceylon, who is studying Human, Social and Political Sciences (HSPS) here at King's:

In her account, Ceylon writes about why she chose the course, what  the teaching is like, the workload and what she likes to do when she is not working, the social life in King's and College families, where and how she likes to do her work, and her thoughts on admissions interviews.

Posted: 21 April 2016

Theology, Religion and Philosophy of Religion Open Day - 18 April 2016

The Theology, Religion and Philosophy of Religion Open Day will take place on Monday 18 April from 1.30-4.30pm (booking required). This will give you the chance to find out about the course, hear a sample lecture, try a scriptural language, learn what students go onto after graduating, and talk to current and past students.

The afternoon will focus on studying in the faculty. To give you an idea of the role of the colleges at Cambridge, Mark Smith, Chaplain and Director of Studies at Christ's College, will be giving a tour of Christ's college and a short talk from 11am to 12pm. If you would like to attend this, please indicate on your booking form.

If you'd like to visit King's College before or after the Open Day sessions, please feel free to drop into the Porters' Lodge at the front of college to take a self-guided tour. We'll be taking students from the Faculty of Divinity after the open day finishes for an informal Q&A session in college - no booking is required for this, just wait outside the Faculty and we'll collect you. If you're not able to make it to the Q&A, please do send us an email if you have any questions.

Posted: 6 April 2016

Tom's account - guess the subject!

Question mark

Credit: Leimenide

Tom is from rural Lincolnshire and has written a detailed King's Student Perspectives account about studying at King's. But which course do you think he is describing below?

The wonderful images of artefacts and the obscure topics in the prospectus entry had me instantly hooked, and I immediately wanted to find out more about the course. I had originally intended to study History at Cambridge, and to specialise in this period, but as soon as I saw ?????? I knew straight away that it was
for me! After some further research, it was the small size of the faculty and the total freedom that the course offers from the first year that drew me to it.

The best thing about studying ????? is that it’s an intellectually stimulating experience. The course is enjoyable in its own right – the system of lectures,
translation classes and supervisions, along with the ready availability of relevant books, means that you can pursue the interests you have in mind when applying to the full. You’ll never find yourself with nothing to do – and this is not necessarily a bad thing! ????? material is interesting and it will always keep you on your toes, which makes for a challenging but enjoyable lifestyle.

You can find out  what Tom's course is and how he as found it in his Student Perspective, and you might like to ask yourself some questions about the material in his course, find out more, and even come along to an open day on 22 June.

Posted: 2 April 2016

New Tracks in Education

Are you interested in how we learn and what makes people tick? Do you want to learn more about international development and how educational inequalities can be overcome? Or are you interested in the role of Literature, Drama and the Arts in society? If so, Education might be the course for you. Education at Cambridge is a rigorous and rewarding interdisciplinary degree. You follow one of three tracks, combining in-depth study of a particular field of interest with an examination of wider educational and social issues:

The Education, Psychology and Learning track focuses on education from a psychological perspective; exploring human development and education in a variety of social and cultural environments.

Education, Policy and International Development provides critical perspectives on education’s role in social and economic change and on approaches to addressing education inequalities globally.

Education, English, Drama and the Arts combines the study of English Literature, and the option of studying Drama, with key issues in Education, such as debates around creativity, learning and culture.

Please note, the Education Course is not offered at King's College, but is available at many other colleges (see course availability).  Find out more on the Faculty of Education website.

Posted: 18 March 2016

Archaeology Events

Thinking about studying Archaeology at university? Here are some upcoming events you might be interested in:

  • April 9 - Archaeology Subject Masterclass. These Masterclasses are aimed at academically-able Year 12 students from any school/college. They provide students with an opportunity to explore topics of interest beyond what is covered within the A Level syllabus, and offer the chance to experience typical undergraduate teaching at Cambridge. Bookings are open to individuals and there is a charge of £10 for places to cover event costs.
  • April 13 - Archaeology Study Day for Sixth Formers at the Tower of London, organised by the Division of Archaeology, Cambridge, in partnership with the Historic Royal Palaces learning team.  Especially suited to students doing A-level Archaeology or History, and/or to anyone thinking of doing Archaeology at University.  Attendance is free, but booking is necessary
  • May 5 – Studying Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia at University: A Conference for Sixth-Formers at the British Museum. Especially suited for those interested in, or curious about, studying Egyptology and Assyriology at University. There will be representatives from most of the UK Universities where Assyriology and Egyptology are taught. Attendance is free, but booking is necessary (deadline: 28th April).

 

Posted: 17 March 2016

Classics Open Day - 18 March 2016

Inside the museum of classical archaeologyThe Faculty of Classics at Cambridge will host this year’s one-day conference for all sixth formers who may be thinking of reading Classics at University.  This is a fun and informative event with sample lectures and briefing sessions by the Access and Outreach Teams from Oxford as well as Cambridge. Our aim is to give sixth formers an opportunity to find out what it is like to study Classics at University and a chance to ask questions they may have about the subject. The day is particularly focused around the courses on offer at Cambridge and Oxford, but is also intended to be relevant for students who may be considering studying Classics or related subjects at other Universities. Please submit a booking form to attend this event.


After the programme finishes at 15:45, King's College will be open for prospective students to attend an informal Q&A session on the application process - the college grounds will also be open for students to take a self-guided tour. We'll collect students from the Sidgwick Site and walk over to King's for 16:00. The session will end at 17:00.

Please see our Open Days page for other upcoming events.

Posted: 4 March 2016

A round up of forthcoming Year 12 events in Cambridge!

Linguistics talk

There are lots of events in Cambridge and new ones are being advertised regularly. Here is a quick round up of key dates. Click on each link to see info and to book a place:

If you would like to look around King's whilst you are in Cambridge for one of these events, remember that the public areas of College are always open to prospective students. If you introduce yourself at the porters' lodge, the porters will give you a copy on the self-guided tour for prospective students, which will show you what you are looking at, and please feel free to email us after your visit with any questions.

We welcome requests from students at state schools in the areas (except Cambridge) listed below to stay overnight the night before events if accommodation is not provided. If this is relevant to you, please read the full information about the Link Area Accommodation Scheme and how to book an overnight room at King's.

Posted: 25 February 2016

Newnham College Subject Taster Days

Inside Newnham CollegeNewnham is one of Cambridge's women's colleges, along with Murray Edwards and Lucy Cavendish (for women aged 21 and over).

Newnham College Subject Taster Days are opportunities for young women in Year 12 to visit the college for a day, to participate in a range of academic sessions introducing them to university study, and to hear all about the admissions process to the University of Cambridge. Students also have the opportunity to meet and talk to current undergraduates in their chosen subject. There is no payment for the day and lunch will be provided free of charge, however students should arrange their own transport to and from the event.

  •    Biological Sciences - 8 March
  •    English - 23 March
  •    STEM Subjects - 7 April
  •    Archaeology - 8 April
  •    Classics - 11 April
  •    History - 14 April

The deadline to submit an application form is noon on Wednesday 24 February.

Posted: 18 February 2016

Music Taster Day

Keyboard of a pianoCredit: Austin Kirk

The Music Taster Day provides prospective year 12 students with a taste of what life as a Music student at the University of Cambridge would be like. Students will  experience the teaching methods used by university academics and gain an insight into the facilities available at the Faculty of Music, whilst meeting students from across the UK. Days include a sample lecture, a tour of a college, a practical session and a talk including a Q and A session with current undergraduates.

The event will take place on Thursday 17 March 2016, and the day will run between 10.00am and 3.30pm.

The deadline for applications is Friday 26th February.

Posted: 15 February 2016

Christ's College Taster Days

A view inside Christ's college, cambridgeInside Christ's College, Cambridge

Christ's College are offering a one-day Taster Day in Law taking place on Tuesday 15th March 2016, and a one-day Taster Day in History & Politics on Monday 14th March.

The programme will include two lectures by Christ's Fellows (or other academics) designed to inspire and enthuse Year 12 students who are hoping to apply for a place to study at Cambridge or other top universities starting in the autumn of 2017. The Taster Day runs from 10.30am – 3.30pm and will also include a talk by the Admissions Tutor (with advice on preparing a Cambridge application), lunch, a tour of the College and the opportunity to meet current students. There is no cost to attend these events. Taster Days are open to UK students currently in year 12 who are attending State school and who will be applying to Universities for 2017 entry. Students must be nominated by their schools, with no more than two nominations per subject, per school.

The closing day for applications is 22 February.

Posted: 12 February 2016

Thomas Campion English Prize

An Archway in Peterhouse CollegePeterhouse is setting some more interesting questions for Year 12  students to discuss for its Thomas Campion English Prize.

Students are asked to write an essay on one of nine given questions, focussing on one or two literary texts that they haven't studied at school before.

Here are just a few of the questions:

“The novel, which is a work of art, exists, not by its resemblances to life, which are forced and material, as a shoe must still consist of leather, but by its immeasurable difference from life, which is designed and significant, and is both the method and the meaning of the work”. (Robert Louis Stevenson).
Do you agree?

“Nothing is funnier than unhappiness”. (Beckett). Discuss.

“There is no such thing as a moral or an immoral book. Books are well written or badly written. That is all”. (Wilde).
Do you agree?

'The poet's voice is not the voice of the person who happens to be the poet.' What is it then?

The full list of questions and details of the competition are available on the Peterhouse website in the Thomas Campion English Prize pdf, and please also read the details of eligibility of the Peterhouse essay prizes. The deadline is 14 March 2016. Best of luck to those who choose to explore these questions, whether just for curiosity or to enter the competition!

Posted: 2 February 2016

How did you choose your course?

Student reading in the Library

Reading in King's Library: what would you be studying?

In a panel session with undergraduates from Leeds and Sheffield universities, one of you asked about how they chose their course. This is a very good question to ask when you meet current students! Here are some responses from Cambridge undergraduates who enjoyed History at school....though you'll notice that not all of them chose the course called History!

At school, I always enjoyed and did well at essay subjects like History and English. I was just never that excited about maths or science lessons, and I never imagined studying those subjects for longer than I had to.[...] I went to lots of Open Days at various universities around the UK when I was in Year 12. It was the talks about studying History that I found really exciting and which made me want to learn more.[...] I thought that Cambridge was a beautiful place and also small enough that I wouldn’t get lost! When I came for a Cambridge Open Day, I went to a talk about studying History here. Several lecturers spoke to us about the course and the material we could study here, and I was surprised at the different kinds of things I could choose to study. Some areas didn’t interest me at all at first, but some lecturers were so enthusiastic about their specialist areas that I couldn’t help but be interested. Apart from anything else, the talk was really useful in terms of practical information, helping me to understand how the course would be structured, what kind of options were available, and even how to go about studying History at university level. I definitely recommend going to these sorts of talks on Open Days, because even simple information like how many lectures you’d expect to be given, and how you’ll be assessed, can help you decide whether it’s the right subject or university for you.
- Fiona, History (more from Fiona)

I discovered Anglo-Saxon, Norse & Celtic (ASNC) while flicking through the Cambridge prospectus. It’s one of the University’s lesser-known degrees, so I hadn’t seen it online before. The wonderful images of artefacts and the obscure topics in the prospectus entry had me instantly hooked, and I immediately wanted to find out more about the course. I had originally intended to study History at Cambridge, and to specialise in this period, but as soon as I saw ASNC I knew straight away that it was for me! After some further research, it was the small size of the faculty and the total freedom that the course offers from the first year that drew me to it.
- Tom, Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic (more from Tom)

I chose to study History because it is a subject which I really enjoyed. I definitely think studying something at university that you enjoy is the best idea; you will be spending a lot of time on it!
- Marie, History (more from Marie)

The breadth of my degree is what first drew me to it; the opportunity to continue to explore history and literature and languages all together. Learning ancient languages has always felt a little bit magical for me, like you’re accessing some arcane wisdom, and breaking a code at the same time. Being able to study a culture in its entirety, to track its changes, to read its language, to explore its philosophy, just opens up a whole world of exploration of big ideas about human history and identity, whilst also allowing you to really get to grips with the nitty-gritty textual analysis and specific ideas.
- Qasim, Classics (more from Qasim)

In lower sixth I realised that the one thing that united my A level subjects was the theme of 'religion' and I realised that a Theology degree at Cambridge would enable me to pursue my interest in literature and History while focusing on a core interest of mine, namely religion.
- Eliot, Theology, Religion, and Philosophy of Religion (more from Eliot)

At college I took A-levels in History, English Literature and French. I originally thought that I wanted to study English at university, but as I went through my AS year I realised that History was really where my interest lay, and as I researched university courses I saw how appealing the breadth of material to study as part of a History degree was. Not only did I like the course at Cambridge, but I also knew that I would be being taught by the leading historians in the field.
- Sarah, History (more from Sarah)

Posted: 28 January 2016

Oxford and Cambridge Classics Conference for Sixth Formers

Statue from the museum of classical archaeology

On 18 March 2016, together with colleagues at Oxford, the Cambridge Classics Faculty will be holding the joint Oxford and Cambridge Classics Conference for Sixth Formers.

This year, this will take place at Cambridge. The day provides an opportunity to hear a range of university-style Classics lectures, to find out more about the Classics courses at the two Universities, student life, and the admissions process, and to ask any questions you have.

Full information and a booking form is available on the Classics the Greeks, the Romans and us website.

Posted: 27 January 2016

Hull University public lecture: The death and reinvention of Scotland 1750 - 1850

Credit: David Wilson

On 29 January, Professor Sir Tom Devine, OBE, one of Scotland's most acclaimed historians, is giving a public lecture at the University of Hull on The death and reinvention of Scotland 1750 - 1850.

The lecture starts at 6pm and will last an hour. It will take place at Wilberforce Institute for the study of Slavery and Emancipation, 27 High St, City of Kingston upon Hull, Hull, North Humberside HU1 1NE, United Kingdom (map). For further details, please scroll down this page.

A programme of public lectures at the University of Hull is available.

Posted: 24 January 2016

Vellacott Essay Prize (Year 12)

Peterhouse is setting some interesting questions for Year 12  students to discuss (with reference to any academic discipline or area of interest) for its annual Vellacott Essay Prize.

Students are asked to choose a topic that you have not previously studied at school from the 41 questions, which include a wide range of historical topics, also touching on a number of other subject areas, such as Classics, Theology, Art, Literature, Music, Politics, Architecture and Sociology. Here are some examples of the questions set:

  • Should Classical Sparta be described as a totalitarian state?
  • Was there a 'Third-Century Crisis' in the Roman Empire?
  • When did the Middle Ages begin and end?
  • What were the public functions of art in the Italian Renaissance?
  • Why was Machiavelli's book The Prince so controversial?
  • How and to what effect did the political ideology and practice of Islam change after 1750?
  • What music was popular in nineteenth-century Europe?
  • What did the revolutions of 1848 achieve?
  • To what extent did the First World War signal the rise of a new politcs accross the MIddle East?
  • Discuss the historical significance of one of the following places or buildings: Route 66; The IBM Watson Research Center; the MCG; Reading gaol; The "walkie-talkie".

The full list of questions and details of the competition are available on the Peterhouse website in the Vellacott Prize information pdf, and please also read the details of eligibility and the history of the Peterhouse essay prizes. The deadline is 14 March 2016.Good luck to those who choose to explore some of these topics, whether just for curiosity or to develop an essay and enter the competition!

Posted: 19 January 2016

Year 12 Summer Schools

Bodley's Court lawn

Applications are open for the Year 12 Sutton Trust Summer Schools in Cambridge! These are very popular subject-specific residentials in July and August for eligible students in Year 12 (or equivalent) at state-maintained schools in the UK.  The programme includes lectures, seminars, discussion groups, practical work and social activities, as well as the opportunity to meet current staff and students and to live in a Cambridge College. The residentials are free of charge.

The Sutton Trust Summer Schools provide a very useful insight into what it is like to study at Cambridge so do apply for a place if you are curious to find out about studying at Cambridge and don't have much information about this already. Equally, please be aware that we receive far more applications than we have places available. It is important to read:

For full information and booking, please go to the Cambridge Admissions website. The application deadline is 11 March 2016. Good luck!

In more general terms, you may also find the King's page about applying with limited support or advice helpful.

Posted: 18 January 2016

Oxford and Cambridge Year 12 Student Conferences around the UK

Students in a College

Student conferences are a good opportunity to find out more from subject specialists, students and admissions staff

Bookings are open for the 2016 Oxford and Cambridge Student Conferences, which will take place in Swansea, Birmingham, Merseyside, Newcastle, Lisburn, Edinburgh and Surrey during March.

The conference covers courses available at Oxford and Cambridge (sessions led by subject specialists), Applying to Oxford and Cambridge (including student life) talks, and plenty of opportunities to chat with current students and admissions staff at both universities and find out what studying at Oxford and Cambridge is really like. You will need a teacher to book a ticket for you if you would like to attend - do read the information on the Oxford and Cambridge Student Conference website and ask a teacher to book your place (see the links to the different events on the right-hand side of the webpage linked above).

tracking our migratory birds to Africa and back

Posted: 5 January 2016

Competition: Communicating the Ancient World through film

Credit: Giovanni

The Faculty of Classics at Cambridge is well known for putting the Ancient World on screen. With Mary Beard, Andrew Wallace-Hadrill, and others on the staff, Cambridge’s Classics academics are some of the most familiar faces on TV documentaries.

This new competition invites you to take part in this mission of communicating the Ancient World through film (YouTube, not BBC1 just yet!). We are looking for creative and interesting films which explore a classical object or topic in less than 4 minutes. There will be a prize fund of £500 for the best entries and the winning videos will be put on our unique website – The Greeks, The Romans & Us  – which features a range of videos of Cambridge’s well-known and up-and-coming Classicists.

How to take part

For full details, please see the Video Competition page on The Greeks, The Romans & Us website. The deadline for entries is 15 March 2016. Do send any questions about the competition to the Classics Faculty Schools Liaison Officer.

Good Luck and we look forward to watching your film!

Posted: 3 January 2016

Subject Masterclasses

students outside the faculty of classics Students outside the Faculty of Classics

Subject Masterclasses provide academically-able Year 12 students with the opportunity to explore subjects they are interested in studying at university and may not have previously experienced. Each event includes two lectures, an introduction to the admissions process, and the chance to hear about student life from current undergraduates.

A range of subjects are offered each year, currently bookings are open for February 2016 Masterclasses in:

 

  • Archaeology: Saturday 06 February 2016
  • Genetics and Biochemistry : Saturday 06 February 2016
  • Physics: Saturday 06 February 2016
  • Theology and Philosophy: Saturday 06 February 2016
  • Architecture: Saturday 27 February 2016
  • Classics: Saturday 27 February 2016
  • English: Saturday 27 February 2016

Please be aware there are only a limited number of spaces available so we advise students to book their places quickly. Masterclasses are continually added throughout the year so please register your interest for future events on the Masterclass website.

Posted: 3 January 2016

Cambridge interviews

Supervision

Cambridge interviews are very similar to the supervisions that you have every week as a student here (see how you are taught).

If you apply to Cambridge, you send your UCAS application by the 15 October deadline (Cambridge and Oxford have an earlier deadline than for most UK universities), and most (though not all) applicants are invited for interviews, which take place in early December.

We don't suggest that you worry too much about the details of the application process when you're in Year 10, Year 11 or at this stage of Year 12, but it is useful to get a sense of what interviews are about (they are academic interviews). The important point to understand when looking at interviews, is that if you would like to study at Cambridge in the future, you may already be thinking about whether you can achieve the grades we require (see our entrance requirements), but it is equally important to enjoy your studies and explore and develop your academic interests

When you come for interview, we will be looking for intellectual ability, aptitude for the subject, curiosity and commitment. So the interviewers (specialists in the subejct you have applied for) ask a range of questions relating to the work or reading you have done, both at school and outside it. We we will encourage you to talk about your academic interests and ideas. We encourage you to watch this film about Cambridge interviews.

Posted: 18 November 2015

Interested in languages? literature? politics? history?

If you are studying a language and are also interested in the world (i.e. you enjoy subjects such as politics, history, or literature, for example), then one exciting course that is worth looking at is Asian and Middle Eastern Studies. It's a very flexible course which can be tailored to your interests, so you can study areas from Japan in the East to Morocco in the West, and everything from classical times to the present day.

Studying an asian or middle eastern culture through its language enables you to develop a set of practical skills and knowledge that can be used later in many different ways (graduates go onto some very interesting careers indeed after this course!), and intellectually, you will engage with different ways of understanding our shared world.

There are no specific subject requirements for Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, though we will obviously be very interested in your aptitude for language learning. Most applicants study a foreign language at school. Many applicants have studied social sciences such as Economics or History, but it is also possible to apply and do well with a background in maths and sciences.

There's a very good opportunity to explore this course further if you can get to Cambridge on Saturday 21 November - do book a place on the Asian and Middle Eastern Studies Masterclass, which will include two taster lectures, an opportunity to hear about what studying at Cambridge is like from current students, a introduction to the Cambridge admisisons process, and chance to ask questions.

Posted: 13 November 2015

Mary Renault essay competition (Years 12 & 13)

Credit: Giovanni

St Hugh's College, Oxford is running an essay competition in memory of author Mary Renault (best known for her novels set in ancient Greece) for sixth form students who are not studying Greek or Latin to A level or equivalent.

Essays can be from any subject area and should be on a topic relating to the reception of classical antiquity. This includes Greek and Roman literature, history, political thought, philosophy, and material remains in any period from the Middle Ages to the present.

For full information, please see the Mary Renault prize flyer. The deadline for submissions is 16 January 2016.

Posted: 16 October 2015

Social Science Bites

magnetic words on a board

In this series of illuminating podcasts, you can hear leading social scientists present their perspectives on how our social world is created, and how social science can help us understand people and how they behave. Each podcast includes a downloadable written transcript of the conversation.

Here are just a few suggestions by subject:

There are also Philosophy bites arranged by theme, on everything from Plato’s Cave to Free Will and Morality without God.

Posted: 2 October 2015

Subject Masterclasses - Year 12 Students

Inside a college library

Subject Masterclasses provide academically-able Year 12 students with the opportunity to explore subjects they are interested in studying at university and may not have previously experienced. Each event includes two lectures, an introduction to the admissions process, and the chance to hear about student life from current undergraduates.

Booking is now open for November 2015 Masterclasses in:

  • Engineering - 14 November 2015
  • Physics - 14 November 2015
  • History - 14 November 2015
  • Medicine - 21 November 2015
  • Asian and Middle Eastern Studies - 21 November 2015
  • Genetics and Biochemistry - 21 November 2015

Please be aware there are only a limited number of spaces available so students are advised to book their places quickly.

Masterclasses are continually added throughout the year and you can register you interest for future events here.

Posted: 30 September 2015

Essay Writing - Where To Begin?

tapping a pencil on a black writing pad

Credit:Rennett Stowe
 

Getting those first words on the page when you’ve got an essay to write can seem daunting. There are a few useful tools and guides online that can help you get started and even develop your essay writing skills.

Essay Map is a very straightforward tool for mapping out your key ideas before you begin writing and helps you to create a structured plan from introduction to conclusion.

And if you find graphic plans useful when it comes to mapping out essays, there are lots of different designs online that you can use to organise your ideas.

For something more advanced, Harvard College Writing Centre provides various guides to essay writing. Their guides to writing in different academic disciplines are especially useful if you’re starting to study a subject in greater depth than you ever have before (History? Philosophy? English Literature?).

Posted: 25 September 2015

Word of the Day

dictionary word of the day

Credit: Alan Myers

 

There are a few online dictionaries that post a 'word of the day' to help broaden your vocabulary with less common words as well as suggesting some more familiar words whose meanings you might not be so sure on. You can even sign-up to have these emailed to you daily. Dictionary.com and Merriam-Webster are just two of the websites that offer these free subscriptions.

And if you're studying a modern language you might want to sign-up for the French, Spanish, Italian or German word of the day. You can find even more languages here.

 

Posted: 18 September 2015

What does an Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic dissertation look like?

manuscript in anglo saxonLucinda, an Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic student at Christ’s College, Cambridge, shares her thoughts on her undergraduate dissertation which asks: To what extent did the Anglo-Saxon Church condemn contemporary medical practices, and for what reasons?

She writes that “Although very niche, the Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic degree (or Tripos as it’s known in Cambridge) allows very flexible study in the range of papers it offers. Students can choose to focus on purely literature and language or on history, or as is most popular, they can mix the two together. Students have two opportunities to write a dissertation: it is optional in Second Year (Part I of the Tripos), and compulsory in Third (Part II). The beauty of the dissertation is that it allows you to either expand on an area you've already studied or to tackle something new which isn't covered in lectures or supervisions. For my Part II dissertation I chose the route of challenging myself with something I knew nothing about: Anglo-Saxon medicine.”

You can read more about Lucinda’s dissertation here.

Image: Tim Ellis

Posted: 17 September 2015

Architecture portfolios

Here at Cambridge, we have a degree in Architecture that brings together both the cultural and technological aspects of the subject. You would work on practical design in the department's studios, and also attend lectures and supervisions on everything from the history and theory of Architecture to issues of construction, environmental design and structure. It's a great degree if you enjoy both essay and sciences subjects at school, and if you are good at drawing and have an interest in the history of art and architecture. Do watch the course film!

Architecture Exhibition

A student exhibition - Ines talks about these in her student perspective

If you want to study Architecture in the future, you will need to create a portfolio of your work. We ask students who are invited for interviews to bring a portfolio to discuss with the interviewers. Some of the King's students have very kindly let us share their portfolio work as an example:

Varisa's portfolio
Emily's portfolio
Aska's portfolio

As you can see, there's a range of material here - the choice of material included in your portfolio is up to you. Successful candidates have brought paintings, drawings, prints, photographs and constructions of all kinds, and we particularly like to see material that conveys a spatial and three dimensional interest. We would not, however, expect to see designs for buildings – that is what you come to Cambridge to learn! The Director of Studies has provided further advice on portfolios.

Posted: 16 September 2015

Faith and religion at the Cambridge Festival of Ideas

Festival of ideas banners

Download the programme

The Cambridge Festival of Ideas is a full programme of mostly free events encouraging you to explore the arts, humanities and social sciences, meet academics and students, and engage with the University.

If you are interested in faith and religion, you might enjoy some of the following events:

Posted: 15 September 2015

Humanities at the Cambridge Festival of Ideas

Festival of ideas programme

Download the programme

The Cambridge Festival of Ideas is a full programme of mostly free events encouraging you to explore the arts, humanities and social sciences, meet academics and students, and engage with the University.

Since humans have been able, we have used philosophy, literature, religion, art, music, history and language to understand and record our world. If you are interested in the study of how people process and document the human experience, you might enjoy the following events:

Posted: 15 September 2015

Considering Shostakovich: String Quartet No. 8

Lecture

In many of the courses taught at Cambridge, the Faculty lectures you attend are designed to open up and expand your critical perspective on the topics you are studying, as well as furthering your factual knowledge. You can then explore ideas and specific examples further in your reading and thinking, and through writing your weekly essays, then discussing them with your supervisors (see how you are taught).

As an example, three Cambridge lecturers in Music have written about one of the most famous twentieth-century chamber works from three very different angles.

Why not listen to Dmitri Shostakovich's Eighth Quartet (1960) and read:

  • A historical perspective
    by Prof Marina Frolova-Walker
  • An analytical perspective
    by Prof Nick Marston
  • A performance-related perspective
    by Prof John Rink

These can be found in the Music Faculty's Music@Cambridge Magazine Schools Edition (Michaelams 2015), pages 35-37.

Posted: 12 September 2015

Free and Discounted Theatre Tickets

Theatre stalls looking up at the stage Many theatres across the country will offer a small discount off ticket prices for students. But did you know that there are also some free membership schemes for students and under 26s that offer an even greater discount, and in some cases free theatre tickets? Here are just a few theatres and schemes:

Or if opera is more your thing (or just something you're curious about!), Opera North have a membership scheme for under-30s that offers free or £10 tickets to select performances.

There are, of course, many more theatres with amazing student discounts so check out what's on offer at your local theatre.

Image: Matthew Paulson

Posted: 7 September 2015

Year 12 Classics events in September

Classics group

Do you think that you would enjoy studying the Ancient World? Do read about Why Classics Matters and perhaps watch some of the films on the course website.

Jack says: It was the breadth of the Classics course at Cambridge that appealed to me, as it offered an opportunity to concentrate on areas of particular interest while still covering a huge range of academic disciplines and topics. Amber writes: I was always interested in literature and languages growing up. [...] I considered applying for English or Modern Languages at university, but eventually settled on Classics, and I’m very glad I did – I’ve really enjoyed the course. Read more about Jack and Amber's experiences of studying Classics.

Why not book a place on one of the Classics events in September to find out more?

....and don't forget: you don't need to have studied Latin or Greek before to apply! We have a four year course option as well as the three year course, so you can start from scratch if you like. 

Posted: 2 September 2015

Year 12 Pathways to Law

Law books

Find out about Cambridge Law on the course website.

Do you think that you'd like to study Law at university? If you're just starting Year 12, you're from any of the areas below, and you're either eligible for free school meals or don't have any family members who have been to university, do read the information about the Pathways to Law programme in partnership with your local university. The application deadline is 28 September.

Partner universities and areas you can apply from:

  • University of Bristol: Addresses within an hour’s drive of Bristol.
  • University of Essex: Schools and colleges with low rates of progression to university in the county of Essex and into the neighbouring town of Ipswich.
  • University of Exeter: Schools and colleges in Devon, Cornwall, Somerset and Dorset (postcodes EX, TQ, PL, TR, TA, DT) only
  • University of Leeds: Schools and colleges in Yorkshire.
  • London programme (UCL and LSE): Eligible students who live in, or attend a state school in, one of the 32 London boroughs.
  • University of Manchester: Greater Manchester and Cheshire.
  • Nottingham programme (Nottingham and Nottingham Trent): Schools with low rates of progression to university who are within 1 hour's travelling distance from the city of Nottingham.
  • University of Oxford: Eligible students who live in Oxfordshire, Swindon, Berkshire and Buckinghamshire only.
  • University of Southampton: Schools with low rates of progression to university in Hampshire, the Isle of Wight and selected areas of Dorset and Surrey.
  • University of Warwick: Schools and colleges across the West Midlands.

NB. If people around you don't know much about applying to Cambridge University, do also have a look at our page for students applying with limited support and advice.

Posted: 28 August 2015

Manchester & London: opportunity to sign up for Year 12 Music+

Sheet music

Credit: dalcrose (cropped)

Are you about to start an A level / IB Higher Level / equivalent Music course at a state school or college in or near Manchester or London? Do you think that you might want to study Music at university level later on?

There will be a series of Year 12 twilight extension classes in Music taught by experienced teachers and Cambridge academics during the autumn spring terms, followed by a residential visit to Cambridge in mid-March 2016.

Interested? Do read the full information on the Music Faculty website and make sure that you register by Friday 25 September 2015. It's free!

Posted: 27 August 2015

Undergraduate dissertations

For quite a few of the essay courses at Cambridge, there are opportunities to work on a dissertation. This would normally be in the later years, and sometimes you can choose to write a dissertation to replace one of your exam papers (see the structure of your chosen course). As Fiona, one of our History students says, 'it’s a good way to spend time studying something that you’re particularly interested in, and to research material which has hardly been studied before'. Many students enjoy researching and writing their dissertation so much that they decide to go on to further research after their degree, and they apply for Masters and PhD courses.

Christ's College has produced a very interesting resource with accounts of what some current undergraduates are studying for their dissertations. Do visit their website to find out more:

Posted: 27 August 2015

King's students write about a typical day

Student with an inflatable boat

Do you want to know what it's like to be a student at King's? King's College Student Union (KCSU) is keen to help you out - they are collecting short accounts written by current students of what it is like to study here. Do look at A Day In The Life Of.... and click on the subject you're most interested in, or start with Scott's general description of life as a fresher.

Did you find this useful? Then do also look a our King's Student Perspectives section for more student writing.

Posted: 25 August 2015

What else might be waiting to be discovered?

Statue of Robin Hood with his bowToni Bray - Robin and his Bow

You might have read recently about a discovery by a PhD student at Leeds Trinity University which reveals a darker side to Robin Hood’s reputation in the eighteenth-century. Stephen Basdeo found the long forgotten work, Little John's Answer to Robin Hood and the Duke of Lancaster (1727), in the Special Collections of the Brotherton Library at the University of Leeds after reading a footnote referring to the ballad, which had previously been assumed to be a plagiarism of a known work. The ballad is a satire of the first Prime Minister, Robert Walpole (1676-1745), in which the Duke of Lancaster attempts to expose Robin Hood’s corruption to King John. Stephen puts his discovery in context: “our favourite outlaw hero really emerges with a tarnished reputation in the text. He is not noble or gallant but simply a 'thief,' a 'vast cunning man,' who 'abuses his good king.'” This discovery shows that the famous outlaw was not always as popular with people in the past as he is today – and it has remained unchecked and unanalysed all these years!

There may well be Special Collections near you, either in your town library, a nearby university library, or connected to a local museum or heritage site.

King’s College Library has its own Special Collections, as well as the Archive Centre which offers an online introduction to archival research.

Posted: 20 August 2015

Do you live too far away to visit Cambridge?

The Vaults (King' s College Gym)

Different people need different facilities. This is one of the treadmills in the King's Vaults gym.

It is not unusual to make a successful application without ever having set foot in Cambridge. Don't worry if it is not practical for you to visit as there is no requirement to do so.

Since we welcome applicants who live a long way from Cambridge, we do our best to ensure that all the infomation that you need to make a strong application is on our website (see the relevant subject page and how to apply in particular), as well as virtual tours and the life and facilities sections so that you can get a sense of King's as a place:

We also have a dedicated page for if you don't feel very well supported for your application, and the student perspectives are particularly useful (if you read five or six of these, you'll have a very good sense of what studying at King's is like).

The University has made some films which you may also find useful:

Posted: 14 July 2015

Would you like to visit Cambridge during the summer?

King's

Prospective students are always welcome to visit

Remember that you are welcome to visit any time, even if there's not an official open day on.

  • If you would like to look around a college, it is best to introduce yourself at the porters' lodge (the reception). Porters are normally happy for prospective students to walk around the public areas and will give you any maps / information available. There's also a map of Cambridge, which shows where the colleges are. You'll see that the middle of Cambridge is quite small, so you will be able to walk between most colleges easily.
  • If you would like to visit King's, do introduce yourself at the porters' lodge when you arrive. The college will be open to prospective students and we have a self-guided tour that you can use.
  • You may find the Following in the Footsteps audio tour useful for visiting other parts of the University. Cambridge University is made up of colleges, faculties (where you go for lectures), libraries (over 100 of them!) and offices dotted around the city, and following this tour will give you a good sense of how it all works.
  • There are also some great museums and teaching collections which you might like to explore, most of which are free to visit. Or you might like to check the 'what's on' list for the day you are visiting - there are often talks and exhibitions on, as well as the Shakespeare Festival.

Posted: 10 July 2015

Essay Competition

Robinson College

Robinson College

Robinson college is setting some interesting questions for Year 12  students to discuss (with reference to any academic discipline or area of interest) for its annual Essay Prize:

  1. 'Science has made us Gods even before we are worthy of being men.'
  2. 'Poetry is the art of uniting pleasure with truth.'
  3. 'The real purpose of books is to trap the mind into doing its own thinking.'
  4. 'Science may set limits to knowledge, but should not set limits to imagingation.'
  5. 'It's in literature that true life can be found. It's under the mask of fiction that you can tell the truth.'

If you would like to write an essay for this competition, the deadline is 1 August 2015. Do read the full information on Robinson College's website.

Posted: 8 July 2015

Architecture Student Work Exhibition in London (7-9 July)

Architecture Exhibition

A previous ArcSoc exhibition

The University of Cambridge Architecture Society (ArcSoc) annual Summer Show is a presentation of student work in London, with material on display from the initial explorations of first year to the final schemes of third and fifth years.

If you're interested in studying Architecture, do keep an eye on the Summer Show page for further detail of what is happening on 7 - 9 July. During the exhibition there will be an afternoon of free public lectures from contemporary practitioners and university academics, as well as a day for prospective students. The location is G1 F Block, Truman Brewery, 91 Brick Lane, London E1 6QL.

Photos from past shows are also available, and Ines discusses the Summer Show and other ArcSoc activities in her King's Student Perspective.

Posted: 19 June 2015

Reading lists!

Books on a bookshelf

Doing some reading is a good way to develop your academic interests, but don't get overwhelmed! Credit: Les Chatfield

We're sometimes asked for advice about what prospective students should read.

If you are looking for reading suggestions (particularly as you approach the summer, when you may have a bit more time), you may find the reading lists for all subjects in the offer-holders' section useful. Depending on your subject, you will find useful book sugestions or problem-solving websites and other advice. These 'lists' can be particularly useful if you don't know where to start, or if you'll be studying a subject at Cambridge that you don't already study at school, such as Human, Social and Political Sciences, Law, Philosophy, Engineering, Linguistics, Medicine or Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic.

Do:

  1. Be yourself and follow your interests
    None of the Cambridge courses have books that you have to read before you apply, so if you've already found some material that you're finding interesting and engaging, and is developing your academic interests, don't stop!
  2. Make a few brief notes
    Making a list of the points that interest you, or any thoughts on the arguments you encounter, is a good thing to do as you read if you can (even if you keep them very brief). This will help you to remember the most important points, and also to notice where your interests lie.
  3. Explain to somebody else
    Are you taking it in? A good way to ensure that you've understood something is to try to explain it to somebody else. Do you have any friends or relatives who might be interested in what you're reading? If you can explain the main points in an idea to somebody who does not know about the subject, that is normally a good sign that you've got it clear in your own head!

Try to avoid:

  1. Being daunted
    The lists we provide are meant to be helpful for those looking for suggestions. We're not trying to overwhelm you. Just like the kinds of suggestions you get from supervisors and lecturers when you're studying at Cambridge, some of the subject lists are quite long so that you can pick and choose according to your interests. Don't be put off by this!
  2. The tick-box approach
    The important point about your reading is not which books you've read but what you get out of them. So our advice is: don't rush to read as many books as possible in order to tick them off a reading list. It is much more important that you take time to enjoy the material and think about it. Remember that the best things to mention on the personal statement or your UCAS application form are the things that genuinely interest you.

Posted: 15 June 2015

Introduction to Archives

Rupert Brooke in uniformRupert Brooke in uniform, at Blandford, Dorset. 1914. Archive Centre, King’s College, Cambridge. RCB/Ph/262

Why not access and use primary sources to explore and develop your academic interests this Summer?

King's College Archive Centre has developed an Introduction to Archives, using the papers of King's student and First World War poet Rupert Brooke as a case study.

The website is divided into two parts:

  1. Introduction to archives: What archives are, the key principles of archival research and how to access primary sources (sections 1-6).
  2. Rupert Brooke case study: How these ideas apply to the papers of Rupert Brooke, through interpretation activities focussing on different aspects of his life and a few of his most famous poems (sections 7-10).

Once you've worked through the online resources, you'll be ready to visit an archive near you to do some research of your own.

Posted: 12 June 2015

Multi-Story Music

Sculpture in Peckham multi-storey car parkEva Berendes, 'Untitled (Osaka)', part of a Bold Tendencies exhibition at the Peckham multi-storey car park. Image credit: Loz Pycock

Multi-Story is a project that brings classical music to unexpected places, run by (former King's student!) composer Kate Whitley and conductor Christopher Stark.

The Multi-Story Summer Programme 2015 takes place in a disused multi-stor(e)y car park in Peckham. On 1 and 2 July, the Multi-Story Orchestra will be joined by more than 200 local children to perform I am I say, a new commission by Kate and British Egyptian poet Sabrina Mahfouz.

See the full Multi-Story line-up this Summer, part of a wider programme of visual art, architecture, music, theatre, film, and literature produced by Bold Tendencies at the same venue.

Posted: 9 June 2015

History of Art with the Tate

Gallery at Tate St. IvesA gallery at Tate St Ives. Image credit: Herry Lawford

Tate galleries host the national collection of British art from 1500 to the present day, along with international modern and contemporary art.

If you'd like an introduction to the History of Art, or an opportunity to explore and develop your existing interests in the field, try their free online courses.

If you have the opportunity, visit the Tate:

The Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Museum of Modern Art offer similar free online resources.

Posted: 29 May 2015

City Health Check: How design can save lives and money

Manchester at night

Manchester at night.
Credit: Richard Heyes

How can the design of a city impact on public health?

1. Write a few ideas of your own down first of all!

2. Compare your ideas with what the researchers found when they investigated this question in nine cities in England. What link did they find between city design and health in  Birmingham, Bristol, Leeds, Liverpool, London, Manchester, Newcastle, Nottingham and Sheffield?

The ornamental Lake at Alexandra Park, Manchester

Manchester's Alexandra Park had a regeneration project. Credit: Alex Pepperhill (cropped)

The information is in the City Health Check RIBA article (the report itself is available to download at the end).

3. What about other cities? If you live near a different city or know one well, what would you say about it's design and the health of the people who live there? What changes would you make, if any?

Posted: 26 May 2015

York Festival of Ideas 2015

Posted: 18 May 2015

June Events in Cambridge (early booking recommended!)

Asian and Middle Eastern Studies stand at an open day

A College subject day will be useful even if you are unsure about College choice or have already chosen a different College.

As well as the Cambridge Open Days across all subjects and colleges on Thurs 2 July and Fri 3 July, a number of Year 12(*) subject events in June are open for booking at the moment.

Although we know that most of you are really busy with exam work at the moment, do be aware that some of these events allocate places on a first come, first served basis, so do try to get your booking in as soon as possible if you are interested.

* 'Year 12' is the quick way to explain, but these events are for all students who plan to apply in October 2015.

Posted: 12 May 2015

Louise Bourgeois: French-American artist, sculptor and printmaker

Spider sculpture

One of the Louise Bourgeois spiders. Credit: Appie Verschoor

Louise Bourgeois (1911-2010) was a French-American artist and widely known as one of the most influential artists of modern and contemporary art.

You might enjoy exploring some of the themes in Bourgeois's work on the extensive Louise Bourgeois pages  from New York's Museum of Modern Art. This resource includes information about Bourgeois's techniques, and the presentation of her work in books and series.

If you would like to experience some Louise Bourgeois work close up, you may be interested in the exhibition featuring her Autobiographical Series (1994) and 11 Drypoints (1999) at Northumbria University Gallery, which is on until 22 May. You'll find the Gallery on Sandyford Road, Newcastle (NE1 8ST). See the Northumbria University website for details.

The same exhibition will be available at later dates in Hebden Bridge, Galway, Lisburn, Petroc, Leeds, Grimsby, Birmingham, Inverness and Dumfries - see the Hayward touring exhibition website.

Posted: 30 April 2015

University of Hull's OpenCampus Programme

Joseph Hillier, Moving Matters (2007), displayed outside the Logistics Institute, Hull University Business School. Image credit: Gnomonic.

It's a new term at the University of Hull's OpenCampus programme:

  • There is a new series of Tea-Time Talks, focusing on health and wellbeing, held on Tuesday evenings from 6.15pm to 7.45pm. The series will kick off with a talk by Professor Andrew L. Clark, Chair of Clinical Cardiology at Hull York Medical School, on 'The world's number one killer: "can you save yourselves?"' on Tuesday 5 May.
  • The Culture Café will be celebrating postgraduate and postdoctoral research emerging from the Department of English on Wednesdays from 2pm to 4.30pm. In the first session, Emma Butcher will explore the Brontës' childhood writings on Wednesday 6 May. 

Places are limited, so booking is essential. You can register online, or call Nicola Sharp or Jackie McAndrew on 01482 466321 / 466585.

Posted: 21 April 2015

ELECTION - The Cambridge Politics Podcast

Spot the First Minister?! Nicola Sturgeon campaigning in Edinburgh on 3 April 2015. Image credit: hockadilly

Can democracy adapt to our strained political system?  Who (if anyone) will ‘win’ in 2015? What can the lessons of the past teach us about the future?

David Runciman, Head of the Department of Politics and International Studies here in Cambridge, puts these questions and more to philosophers, historians, scientists, and political thinkers in a weekly podcast in the run-up to the general election.

In recent weeks, he's talked to:

The ELECTION team publish a new episode every Wednesday.

Posted: 10 April 2015

Introduction to Archives Workshop for Sixth Formers at King's

Kennesaw State University ArchivesKennesaw State University Archives. Image credit: Anne G

  • Are you currently taking AS / A Level History or English Literature?
  • Are you interested in finding out about and using archives in your work?

If so, King's College Archive Centre invites you to an Introduction to Archives Workshop on Friday 10 April, using the papers of Rupert Brooke.

Peter Monteith, an archivist at King's College, will explore approaches to using archives for research with you. You will then gain experience of archives, through an exploration of the life, poetry, and myth surrounding King's student and First World War poet Rupert Brooke.

The workshop will equip you to use the King's College Archive Centre yourself, either during an optional reading room session on the morning of Saturday 11 April (numbers limited) or at another time during the Centre's normal opening hours.

See the programme for the workshop and email us now at undergraduate.admissions@kings.cam.ac.uk to book a place. 

NB. Are you at a state school in one of the areas listed below? If so, please do request accommodation through the Year 12 Link Area Accommodation Scheme at King's for this or any other event advertised on the Cambridge page!

Posted: 23 March 2015

Theology and Religious Studies Open Day in Cambridge

Celebrating HoliCelebrating Holi, a Hindu Spring Festival. Image credit: Alessandro Baffa

The Faculty of Divinity is holding an Open Day for those interested studying Theology and Religious Studies at Cambridge on 20 April. You can find out more and book a place on the Faculty website.

You can find out more about studying Theology and Religious Studies at King's on our website. If you do visit Cambridge for the Open Day, you are very welcome to visit King's whilst you're here.

NB. Are you at a state school in one of the areas listed below? If so, please do request accommodation through the Year 12 Link Area Accommodation Scheme at King's for this or any other event advertised on the Cambridge page!

Posted: 13 March 2015

Charles Rennie Mackintosh's Architecture

Detail

Detail from above the door at the Glasgow School of Art. Credit: Dave & Margie Hill / Kleerup

Scottish Architect Charles Rennie Mackintosh is one of the leading figures of late 19th and early 20th Century architecture. The majority of his buildings are located in Glasgow (Scotland) and the surrounding area.

Posted: 5 March 2015

Hwæt! Beowulf

An annotated copy of BeowulfA close reading of Beowulf. Image credit: Crossett Library

Hwæt! We Gar-Dena in gear-dagum, þeod-cyninga,  þrym gefrunon, hu ða æþelingas  ellen fremedon!

(Arguably translated into modern English as "Listen! We have heard of the might of the Kings.")

Are you interested in early languages? Beowulf is the longest epic poem in Old English, the language spoken in Anglo-Saxon England before the Norman Conquest. More than 3,000 lines long, Beowulf relates the exploits of its eponymous hero, and his successive battles with monsters.

You can study Beowulf, among other Old English texts, as part of our Anglo-Saxon Norse and Celtic degree course, which centres on early and Medieval languges and history.

Bookings are now open for the Anglo-Saxon Norse and Celtic Year 12 masterclass on 21 March.  The next Anglo-Saxon Norse and Celtic departmental Open Day will take place on 24 June 2015.

Posted: 1 March 2015

Year 12 Subject Days at St. John's College, Cambridge

Bridge of Sighs, St. John's College, CambridgeBridge of Sighs (1831), St. John's College, Cambridge. Image credit: JH Images.co.uk

Archaeology Study Day: 23 March 2015

What is it like to study Archaeology at university? What does it mean to be an Archaeologist in the modern world? Come along to St John’s College, Cambridge on the 23rd of March to find out! The day is run by a friendly mixture of Cambridge archaeologists and current students who will provide sample lectures, seminars and workshops designed to provide a real insight into life studying Archaeology at University. The day is free to attend and there is limited overnight accommodation available for those travelling from further away. For further information and the booking form, please see the St. John's College website

Biological Sciences Study Days: 25 and 27 March 2015

St John’s College will be hosting two Biological Sciences Subject Days. These days are aimed at Year 12 students taking at least two sciences at A Level (including Mathematics, Biology, Chemistry and Physics) who are interested in studying Biology and related fields at university. The day will include an exciting mix of lectures, supervision style workshops and information about making a competitive application. The day will also include a buffet lunch and a tour of the college. The event is free of charge and there is limited overnight accommodation for those that require it. For booking and further information please see the St. John's College website.

Posted: 27 February 2015

Exhibitions at the Kirkleatham Museum, East Cleveland

Kirkleatham Museum

Entrance to the Kirkleatham Museum. Credit: David (cropped)

If you are interested in old Anglo-Saxon history, you might enjoy visiting the Kirkleatham Museum in Redcar & Cleveland, which is home to some important exhibitions:

  • The Saxon Princess
    This popular exhibition is based on a six-year archeological project in East Cleveland, in which archaeologist Dr Steve Sherlock and local volunteers made some spectacular finds - a royal burial site and precious metal jewellery from an un-named Anglo-Saxon princess, dating back to the seventh century.  See this short film of Steve Sherlock speaking about the area.
  • Street House before the Saxons
    Linked to the Saxon Princess material, this second exhibition is based on Dr Steve Sherlock's other excavations between 1979 and 2004. Through photographs, films and archaeological objects, you can find out more about a Neolithic cairn from around 3,000 BC, Bronze Age burial sites and the remains of a timber house and timber circles that date from around 2,000 BC, as well as a Roman villa (AD 370) and Anglo-Saxon village.

More infomation about visiting the museum is available on the Redcar & Cleveland website.

If you enjoy this material, it would be worth having a look at the Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic (ASNC) course at Cambridge (there's a film about it on the course films page).

Posted: 16 February 2015

Oxford and Cambridge Student Conference in Newcastle

Students in a College

Student conferences are a good opportunity to find out more from subject specialists, students and admissions staff

On 18 March 2015 there will be a free Oxford and Cambridge Student Conference in Newcastle (very close to the train station) for students in Year 12.

The conference covers courses available at Oxford and Cambridge (sessions led by subject specialists), Oxford and Cambridge Explained talks, and plenty of opportunities to chat with current students at both universities and find out what studying at Oxford and Cambridge is really like. You will need a teacher to book a ticket for you if you would like to attend - do read the information on the Oxford and Cambridge Student Conference website and ask a teacher to book your place.

Places are also available at similar conferences in Lisburn, Edinburgh, Birmingham, and Surrey.

tracking our migratory birds to Africa and back

Posted: 15 February 2015

More Year 12 Saturday Masterclasses open for booking!

Lab work

What is studying your subejct at university level really like? Credit: Laurence Livermore

Booking has opened for more Saturday Masterclasses in Cambridge for Year 12 students. These events provide you with an opportunity to explore topics of interest beyond what is covered within your school syllabus, and offer the chance to experience typical undergraduate teaching at Cambridge.

  • Modern and Medieval Languages
  • Philosophy and Theology
  • Education
  • Law
  • Anglo-Saxon, Norse, and Celtic
  • Engineering
  • Politics and International Relations
  • Genetics and Biochemistry
  • Physics

For details and booking, please see the Cambridge admissions website.

Posted: 11 February 2015

Sixth Form Philosophy Conference: 19 March

Question markThe Philosopher (2012). Image credit: Yau Hoong Tang

The University of Cambridge Faculty of Philosophy is holding a free one-day conference for Year 12 students.

The conference is open to those currently studying philosophy, or to those who are thinking of studying it at university. The day will consist of three lectures given by leading academic staff from the Faculty. The aim is to enrich and extend, rather than simply duplicate, the coverage of topics typically studied in school. There will also be a discussion session over buffet lunch for any teachers accompanying their students.

Places are limited, and are restricted to four students per school. Applications are now open, and must be made online by a member of school staff on behalf of their students. Applications close on 27 February ; schools will be notified of the outcome by 5 March 2015.

Posted: 10 February 2015

Saturday Masterclasses with places still available

Philosophy sign

Credit: dakine kane

There are still places available at the following Year 12 Saturday Masterclasses in Cambridge:

Saturday 7 February:

Saturday 14 February:

Saturday 21 February:

Ful details and booking are available on the Cambridge Admissions website.

Posted: 5 February 2015

King's Year 12 Link Area Accommodation Scheme

King's College

Credit: Shane Global (cropped)

If you go to a state school in one of the King's link areas (much of North East England and the West Berkshire area), do read about our Year 12 Link Area Accommodation Scheme. We may be able to help you to attend events in Cambridge such as a Saturday subject masterclass, a department open day, a science festival event, or any college open day by offering you free B&B accommodation in King's College the night before.

Posted: 5 February 2015

Year 11 and Year 12 Subject Taster events at Newcastle University

Newcastle University

Newcastle University. Credit: Chris Thomson

Booking is open for Newcastle University's Discover More events on Wednesday 11 March and Wednesday 25 March 2015. 

If you are in Year 11 or Year 12, these events give you an opportunity to find out more about what studying your subject at university level is like, as well as gaining insights into future career possibilities.

Please see the information on Newcastle University website (which includes a link to the application form). If you would like to request a place, you must submit your application by Friday 13 February 2015.

Posted: 31 January 2015

Year 12 Taster Day (relevant to Classics, History, and History of Art)

Classical archaeology

Emmanuel College is offering an opportunity for Year 12 (or equivalent) students to visit Cambridge and find out more about studying Classics, History and History of Art at a Taster day on Tuesday 17 February:

The programme:

  • 09:45 - Arrival and welcome to Emmanuel College
    (Dr Chris Whitton, Director of Studies for Classics, Emmanuel College)
  • 10:15 - Talk: Studying Classics at University
    (Dr Nigel Spivey, Lecturer in Classical Art and Archaeology)
  • 11:15 - Lecture: Homer and the Origins of Greek Art
  • 12:15 - Lunch with undergraduates
  • 13:00 - Guided walk through Cambridge to the Faculty of Classics
  • 13:30 - Guided visit to the Museum of Classical Archaeology
    (Jennie Thornber: Education Co-ordinator)
  • 15:00 - Final question and answer session
  • 15:30 - Depart

If you would like to come to this event, do email Lizzie from Emmanuel College at access@emma.cam.ac.uk with your name, the name of your school, and your contact email address.

Posted: 30 January 2015

Holocaust Memorial Day 2015: Keeping the Memory Alive

Today is Holocaust Memorial Day, which remembers the victims of genocide across time and countries. 27 January marks the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau, the largest of the Nazi death camps. 2015 is especially significant, since it is the 70th anniversary since the liberation of Auschwitz and the 20th anniversary of the genocide in Srebenica, Bosnia. This year's theme, Keeping the Memory Alive, asks us to reflect on the relationship between history and memory: how does one alter the other? What does it mean to memorialise the past and how shall we do it?

January marks the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau, the largest Nazi death camp - See more at: http://hmd.org.uk/page/why-mark-27-january-holocaust-memorial-day#sthash...
January marks the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau, the largest Nazi death camp - See more at: http://hmd.org.uk/page/why-mark-27-january-holocaust-memorial-day#sthash...

The Holocaust Memorial Day Trust defines genocide and documents and commemorates the following cases:

Young Hartlepudlians will be Keeping the Memory Alive with a memorial at Avenue Ballroom in Lauder Street from 6.30pm to 8.30pm on Tuesday 27 January. The event is free and open to all, but booking is required, so please contact Beth Storey on 01429 523900.

The Holocaust Memorial Day Trust's Youth Champion Programme allows you to further research and reflect on the Holocaust and subsequent genocides and supports you in organising an event of your own.

The Anne Frank Trust UK remembers the Holocaust, and challenges prejudice and reduces hatred today, by drawing on Anne Frank's life and diary. You can visit the Trust's History for Today exhibition in York Minster from 26 January to 1 February.

Posted: 27 January 2015

BBC Taking Liberties Season

Houses of Parliament, WestminsterThe Houses of Parliament, Westminster. Image credit: Treye Rice

2015 marks the 800th anniversary of the Magna Carta. The BBC is leading commemorations with its Taking Liberties season of programmes on Britain's democracy: past, present, and future.

Ask yourself: are the democratic freedoms manifest in the Magna Carta or the de Montfort Parliament real or imagined, either then or now?

Posted: 26 January 2015

Year 12 Studying Music Taster Days

King's MusiciansKing's Musicians

The Faculty of Music here in Cambridge is running Studying Music Taster Days for Year 12s on Monday 2 March and Friday 13 March. You will experience the teaching and facilities on offer at the Faculty, whilst meeting fellow Music students from across the UK. The day will include a sample lecture, a tour of a college, a practical session and a Q&A session with current undergraduates.

Whether or not you decide to study Music at Cambridge, there is a very active and diverse Music scene across the University and its colleges, with opportunities for every interest and standard!

Posted: 23 January 2015

Year 12 Residential visits at Robinson and Trinity Hall Colleges

Robinson College

Robinson College

All students at Cambridge are both part of the University and part of one of the Colleges. You can read about this collegiate system on the university website, and each College also has its own website, like King's.

Would you like to find out more about living and studying in a Cambridge College? There are places available on Year 12 (or equivalent) residential visits at Robinson College and at Trinity Hall College. Visiting any College will give you a good sense of what being part of a collegiate university is like and what is most important to you when you later choose a College. It will also help you to develop your course interests and find out more about how you will be taught at Cambridge.
 

  • 7-8 April 2015: Robinson College Arts and Humanities Student Residential
    Information and booking
    For further details please email Katie Vernon at slo@robinson.cam.ac.uk
     
  • 29-30 June 2015: Robinson College Science and Maths Student Residential
    Information and booking
    For further details please email Katie Vernon at slo@robinson.cam.ac.uk
     
  • 16-17 September 2015: Trinity Hall College 'Small Subjects' Student Residential
    For students interested in studying Philosophy, History of Art, Theology, or Land Economy.
    Information and booking
    For further details please email Katie Vernon at .

Posted: 21 January 2015

Classics & Ancient History Essay Competition

St John's College, Oxford is running an essay competition for UK students in Year 12 (or equivalent) who are interested in Classics & Ancient History.

The essay titles include:

  • Is it possible to write ancient Greek or Roman history without cities at its centre?
  • Who and /or what are missing from our archaeological record of the ancient world? Consider what types of objects survive and who they represent.

If you are interested in thinking about these kinds of questions or researching and writing an essay for the competition, do go to the St John's College Oxford website, where you will find a full list of titles and the submission details for the competition.  The deadline for submissions is 4 pm on Thursday 26th February 2015.

Posted: 19 January 2015

Year 12 Sutton Trust Summer Schools

Bodley's Court lawn

Booking is open for the Year 12 Sutton Trust Summer Schools in Cambridge! These are very popular subject-specific residentials in July and August for students in Year 12 (or equivalent) at state-maintained schools in the UK.  The programme includes lectures, seminars, discussion groups, practical work and social activities, as well as the opportunity to meet current staff and students and to live in a Cambridge College. The residentials are free of charge.

For full information and booking, please go to the Cambridge Admissions website.

The Sutton Trust Summer Schools provide a very useful insight into what it is like to study at Cambridge so do apply for a place if you are interested. Equally, please be aware that we receive far more applications than we have places available. It is important to read the detailed criteria for selection.

The application deadline is 9 March 2015. Good luck!

Posted: 15 January 2015

Year 12 Subject Masterclasses in Cambridge

Chemistry test tubes

Subject-specific sample lectures are available. Credit: Horia Varlan

Booking is open for some subject masterclasses organised by the central Cambridge Admissions Office.  These masterclasses take place on Saturdays in February  and are for students in Year 12 (the penultimate year of school).

The subjects are:

  • Classics
  • Linguistics
  • Medicine
  • Chemistry
  • Genetics and Biochemistry
  • Modern and Medieval Languages
  • History
  • Philosophy and Theology

...and if the course you want to study is not in that list, don't worry because further masterclasses will be announced later this year.

For more detail, please read the information about  Subject Masterclasses on the Cambridge Admissions website. If you would like to book a place, he link is available in the table on that page.

Posted: 5 January 2015

History Virtual Classroom

Middlemarch

What role can a historical novel play in the study of History?
Credit: Martha Garvey

If you enjoy studying History and want to know more about what it is like at university level, make sure that you have a look at the History Faculty's virtual classroom:

Posted: 5 December 2014

The French Revolution: Tearing up History

The death of marat

The death of Marat. Credit: paukrus (cropped)

There's an interesting documentary on BBC iplayer, which explores the history of the French Revoution through the story of its art.

The programme is presented by Dr Richard Clay, Senior Lecturer in History of Art at the University of Birmingham.

Posted: 30 November 2014

Excellence Hub for Yorkshire and Humberside

York Campus

University taster events show you what studying a subject in depth at university-level would be like. Credit: John Robinson

The Excellence Hub for Yorkshire and Humberside is an exciting collaboration between the universities of Hull, Leeds, Sheffield and York to provide enrichment events through the year for students who have been identified as high achieving by their schools or colleges.

Look at the list of upcoming Subject Taster Events.

The events are open to students across the UK. You can apply to attend the events as an individual, or one of your teachers can apply for a group from your school to attend. Priority for places is given to students who meet one of the criteria below, then the remaining places are given to students who do not meet the criteria. Some events are for Year 12 students, others are for younger students.

Priority criteria:

  • eligible to receive free school meals.
  • no history of higher education (studying at university level) in your immediate family (including any siblings).
  • living in local authority care.

Do keep an eye on this project. Further events will be advertised on the Excellence Hub website in due course.

Posted: 13 November 2014

Preparing for interviews

How Stuff Works magazine

We recommend that you explore topics that interest you further (there are a lot of ways to do this).

We interview most (but not all) students who apply for a place at Cambridge. The interviews are with subject specialists who ask you academic questions to explore your potential for the course you have applied for.

How do you prepare for a Cambridge interview? Here are some tips:

Long-term preparation (before you apply)

  • If you enjoy learning, the good news is that you shouldn't need to change anything significant to prepare for interviews at Cambridge. The most important thing you can do is to develop your academic interests (which you're likely to find that you've already been doing!)
  • Find a Cambridge course that genuinely interests you so that you have natural curiosity and enjoy developing your skills and finding out more.
  • Look at the resources section on the relevant subject page for specific suggestions (e.g. Engineering), but also feel free to follow your own interests or use other resources and books that you find helpful. 
  • Understand that Cambridge interviewers will be interested in your academic interests and how you think and work, not only what you know. The interviews are academic interviews, designed to test this.  This film shows what Cambridge interviews are about.

Short-term preparation (after you have applied)

  • See this advice and our interview guidelines.
  • Watch Film 1 and Film 2 to get a sense of what will happen if you are invited for interview.
  • Carry on developing your academic interests.  Use the resources section on the relevant subject page if you are looking for suggestions.
  • Don't neglect your normal school work - if you are currently at school, we know how busy you are, and you can develop your interests within your school curriculum by putting your best into your homework assignments. Remember that most of your interview preparation has already been done at this stage.
  • Don't worry excessively about the interview itself. Know that the interviews are not a test of how good you are at being interviewed (we're not looking for polish or perfection). They are about your subject(s),  so the only way you can improve your chances is to carry on focusing on your academic work and interests.
  • Try to trust your interviewers if you can! They are all teachers and they want you to achieve. They will know how to ask further questions to tease what they need out of you, and they know that interviewees are nervous so they are looking for raw ability and academic commitment, not perfection.

Posted: 4 November 2014

Cambridge Subject Films

Marking on a map

Geography fieldwork. Credit: Richard Allaway

Are you exploring the courses available at Cambridge? One way to get a quick overview is to look at some of the subject films.

The films are only short, but they explain the structure and opportunities in each course, show you some of the faculty facilities, and have  current students giving their views and reasons for choosing each subject, tips for applying from the lecturers, and information about what students go on to do when they graduate.

You may also find the advice about choosing a subject useful, and there are lists of transferable skills for most courses (or options within courses). These lists set out the advantages that each subject gives you for your future career.

The most important question to ask yourself, is what would you enjoy studying in depth?

Posted: 30 October 2014

Cambridge Sculpture Trails

Double Helix Sculpture

Double Helix sculpture in Clare College. Credit: Nige Brown

Did you know that Cambridge has lots of 20th and 21st century sculptures in and around the city? You will find both pieces by major international figures and work by up-and-coming sculptors.

Come and explore for yourself! There are three Sculpture trails that you can use, and if you follow the links and information on the website, you can find out more about the sculptors and their work.

Posted: 27 October 2014

Where is the Art in Science?

Julia Lohmann, Co-Existence (2009): an art work made of petri dishes commissioned and exhibited by the Wellcome Trust.Julia Lohmann, Co-Existence (2009). An art work made of petri dishes commissioned and exhibited by the Wellcome Trust. Credit: gwire

Do you have a love and flair for both the arts and the sciences? You're not alone!

The Royal Society of Chemistry's annual Bill Bryson Prize challenges students to think about science creatively. The 2014 competition asked 'where is the art in science?'  Brynn Brunstromm found many connections in his winning video entry.

On Wednesday 5 November, the Departments of Chemistry and Fine Art at the University of Reading are running a workshop for Year 9 students to explore the intrinsic links between art and science. Teachers can contact the Chemistry Teachers' Centre to find out more.

Posted: 16 October 2014

History: more than just dates?

Tent City University at St Paul's Cathedral during the Occupy London protestTent City University at St. Paul's Cathedral during the Occupy London protest. Image credit: duncan c

  • How did the tea bag become a symbol for a protest movement?
  • How have protest movements, including the Occupy movement, used public spaces?

Cambridge History for Schools runs hands-on workshops for students in Key Stage 2 and 3 in the Cambridge area.

On the morning of Saturday 8 November at the Faculty of History, West Road, Cambridge:

  • Key Stage 2 (ages 7 to 11): Will Riddington, 'More Than Just Dates: signs and symbols in history' - create a protest movement and symbols of your own
  • Key Stage 3 (ages 11 to 14): Kristen Klebba, 'Public Parks and Their Politics' - design your own public space

Email or call 01223 335302 to book a place.

The Cambridge History for Schools programme continues into the New Year with more workshops scheduled for 28 February and 9 May.  Please see the full programme for more information.

Posted: 14 October 2014

Beverley Literature Festival 2014

Beverley Minster: one of Britain's largest and most imposing parish churches. Image credit: Mill View

East Riding Libraries' Wordquake organises the Beverley Literature Festival in October and the Bridlington Poetry Festival in June each year.

  • On the closing weekend of this year's Beverley Literature Festival, there is still time to hear Shirley Williams talking about the life and work of her mother, pacificst and novelist Vera Brittain (1893-1970)Beverley Minster, 7.30pm to 8.30pm, Saturday 11 October
  • The Festival on the Run continues: John Godber's specially commissioned play Who Cares about the NHS is being performed by the University of Hull's Drama Department. Catch it at Goole Library and Holme Village Hall on Saturday 11 October, Withernsea Centre on Saturday 18 October, and Hedon Library on Saturday 25 October

 

Posted: 10 October 2014

Film competition

King's Chapel

Our own Chapel at King's is a fascinating mix of religion, politics, history, art and architecture.

Have you ever thought about the relationship between religion and other subjects that you might study?

  • History: Consider the impact of religious change on a society prior to 1900;
  • Literature: Reflect on whether literary criticism requires a knowledge of sacred texts;
  • Philosophy: Comment on the relationship between mortality and religion;
  • Politics: Explore the idea of secularism and national politics;
  • Science: Address the relationship between religion and a topic from the natural sciences;
  • Sociology: Consider how an awareness of religion helps understandings of multiculturalism.

Cambridge Divinity Faculty encourages sixth formers to research and think about one of the topics above in a team of up to four 16-19 year olds. The challenge is to produce a film lasting no more than five minutes in response to your chosen topic. This should be academic in content, but the film could take any form: debates, documentaries or responses with artistic elements are all welcome.

If you are interested, do read the further details on the Divinity Faculty website. The deadline is Friday 14 November 2014.

Posted: 10 October 2014

The X Factor: Multidisciplinary (and Interdisciplinary) Approaches to Classics

Image credit: Ingo Gildenhard

At the recent Classics Faculty Sixth Form Study Days, King's Classicist Ingo Gildenhard explained how multidisciplinary approaches to Classics underpins teaching and learning at Cambridge.

The Classics Faculty is divided into caucuses, each of which brings a different approach to the study of Classics: Caucus A (Literature); Caucus B (Philosophy); Caucus C (History); Caucus D (Art and Archaeology) and Caucus E (Linguistics).

Dr. Gildenhard gave an example of how his colleagues in different caucuses each brought a different approach to the study of Ovid's Ars Amatoria [The Art of Love] in a recent lecture series:

  • A: Poetics, or: The (S)expert at Work
  • B: Sexual Ethics [gender relations, feminist readings]
  • C: The Empire Strikes Back [Ovid and Augustus, the politics of the Ars, Ovid’s banishment to the Black Sea]
  • D: Sex and the City [Ovid and the monuments, his rewriting of Rome’s urban topography]
  • E: The Language of Love (and Sex) [how can we understand the different range of meanings of Latin words to English dictionary equivalents - does raptor mean ‘rapist’ or ‘seducer’? and how does it relate to rapina and rapio?]

The students and academics gain enormously from exploring these multidisciplinary perspectives.  If and when they combine two or more approaches to address a particular topic, thereby transcending any one discipline, their work becomes interdisciplinary.

For this reason, King's Classicist John Henderson and his colleague Geoffrey Lloyd pioneered an X Caucus (Interdisciplinary) in the 1980s, to allow and encourage Cambridge students and academics to cross disciplines in their study of the Classics.

Multidisciplinarity is not restricted to Classics! You will be able to find multidisciplinary (and interdisciplinary) approaches to almost any topic. Have you got the X Factor? Think of a topic that has caught your attention in one of your A Level subjects and ask yourself what your knowledge and skills in your other A Level subjects can bring to it.

 

Posted: 9 October 2014

Freshers' reading groups

Welcome - letters displayed in a window

There's a great atmosphere in College as we help the new students to settle in.

Amongst the many activities that take place in Freshers' Week to settle new students into the College community, there are discussion groups in which tutors and students across all subjects meet to discuss a book that everybody has read in advance. This year's book is:

Monbiot is a journalist and activist who read Zoology at University. He presents his book as a polemic for "positive environmentalism". The book consists of a series of essays designed to promote the cultural and economic change that will be necessary to precede any ecological shift. On some level Feral is a radical book with a radical argument, however the question for the King's freshers is how substantial, how convincing is Monbiot's argument and his evidence, and how much of it is the ideological enchantment of a liberal public intellectual?

Book cover

If you fancy reading this book for yourself, you may be interested to think about how Monbiot establishes the veracity of his claims. How scientific is his thesis of "rewilding"? Does the book survive the lengthy anecdotal descriptions of his natural encounters, enchanting though they are? And is it telling that Monbiot is male, enjoys risky outdoor activity and has his moment of epiphany when he slings a dead deer over his shoulders and carries it home? Do you think that he would have a different environmentalism if he weren't so enamored by the wild in him? Or should we be cautious about any dismissal of his honesty? He discusses the effects of logging and mining on Yanomami lands at some length (and spent a fair amount of his own time experiencing it) - it is fair to say that his "rewilding" is borne of some knowledge of different cultural ecologies? Finally, do you think that we should be encouraged by this book, or discouraged?

Posted: 3 October 2014

Year 12 Shadowing Scheme 2015

Chetwynd Court

Find out for yourself what living and studying at Cambridge is really like

If you are in Year 12 at a UK school and nobody from your family has studied at university / not many from your school have got places at Oxford and Cambridge, you might like to find out more by applying for a place on the CUSU Shadowing Scheme.

If you get a place, you would be invited to spend a few days in Cambridge, living in one of the Colleges and "shadowing" a current student studying the subject that you are interested in, that is, going to lectures, supervisions, social activities etc with them. It's a really good way to get a taste of what studying here is really like so do read the details if you think that you might be eligible to apply.

Posted: 2 October 2014

Choosing school subjects

The river in King's

For Cambridge Economics, Maths is required and Further Maths is very helpful where available.

If you have just started Year 11 (15-16 year olds), you will soon need to start thinking about which subjects you will take next year.

If you would like to study at a selective university such as Cambridge or another university in the Russell Group, it is especially important to make sure that you choose subjects that will give you good preparation for courses that you may want to apply for. You may already have a favourite subject that you can research, but don't worry if you don't know yet - the advice about making well-informed choices will help to put you in the best position for when you choose a university course later on. 

As well as the subjects you already do at school, it is worth remembering that there are a lot more courses available that you start new at university - the perfect course for you may be something you've not thought of yet!!

To help you with this process:

Posted: 10 September 2014

Beginning New Testament Greek

Greek text

Credit: darkwood67

Theology and Religious Studies students at Cambridge study a scriptural language in first year, choosen from New Testament Greek, Hebrew, Qur'anic Arabic or Sanscrit. You don't need to have studied foreign languages before, and this is a great opportunity to learn one of the original languages in which the texts of a major world religion were written.

If you are interested in New Testament Greek, we hope that you will find the new website launched by Cambridge Divinity Faculty useful:

Posted: 9 September 2014

Open House London (Sat 20 & Sun 21 September)

On the weekend of 20 and 21 September, there's a chance to explore building design and architecture in London. This is Open House London, which encourages you to explore buildings and spaces, including ones that aren't normally open to the public.

Posted: 4 September 2014

The Baroque in Britain

radio

Credit: Adam Foster (cropped)

Radio 4 iplayer has a useful series of 15 minute programmes on the Baroque in Britain presented by Tim Marlow:

See also:

  • Klaus Carl and Victoria Charles, Baroque Art (New York: Parkstone Press International, 2014)
  • Ernst Hans Gombrich, The Story of Art (several editions)

Are you struggling to access Radio 4 iplayer? Click on 'How to listen' in the menu on the left of this help section. If you are outside the UK, see the iplayer access information.

Posted: 23 August 2014

Cambridge College Open Days for Year 13

Entrance to King's Porters' Lodge

The Porters' Lodge, just inside the entrance of King's on King's Parade

If you are planning to apply to Cambridge this October and would like to attend a College Open Day, do see this page for the events available.

Here at King's, we welcome bookings for our open afternoon on Tuesday 16 September - see our open days page for details and the form.

If you are visiting other Colleges and would like to see King's on the same day, do introduce yourself at the porters' lodge and say that you will be applying to Cambridge. The porters will be happy to let you walk around the public areas, and you might find our self-guided tour useful so that you know what you are looking at. NB if there is a 'College Closed' sign at the front gate, please don't be put off as this just means that tourists cannot enter.

If you are visiting Cambridge on your own, you might also enjoy the Following in the Footsteps audio tour.
 

Posted: 15 August 2014

Hull History Centre

Hull History CentreImage credit: gnomonic

The Hull History Centre brings together the material held by the City Archives and Local Studies Library with those held by the University of Hull. These include the City’s borough archives, dating back to 1299 and amongst the best in the country; records relating to the port and docks of Hull; papers of companies and organisations reflecting Hull’s maritime history; papers of notable individuals including Andrew MarvellPhilip LarkinAmy Johnson and William Wilberforce; records relating to local and national politics and pressure groups; and over 100,000 photographs, illustrations; maps and plans, newspapers, special collections and reference sources relating to Hull and the East Riding.

The History Centre runs regular events, including discovery sessions to learn how to use the resources available in your own research.

Find out about the History Centre's collections and plan your visit.

Posted: 7 August 2014

BALTIC, Gateshead: get involved with contemporary art

BALTIC gallery, GatesheadDavid Shrigley, "You cannot help looking at this," hanging on the north face of the BALTIC, Gateshead. Credit: Glen Bowman

BALTIC is an international contemporary art centre, housed in a converted flour mill on the South bank of the River Tyne in Gateshead.

It is currently showing exhibitions by Daniel Buren (until 12 October) and Lydia Gifford (until 2 November). The gallery is free to use and open to all daily from 10am to 6pm (10.30am on Tuesday). You can also drop into the BALTIC Library, in which you can browse books and journals on contemporary art and design.

BALTIC is currently recruiting a team of enthusiastic and motivated 14 - 25 year-olds to help create and curate new ways to get involved with contemporary art.  See the BALTIC website to find out more.

Posted: 6 August 2014

Siegfried Sassoon's war diaries published in the Cambridge Digital Library

Siegfried Sassoon (1886-1967). Credit: Pere Ubu

The Cambridge University Library holds the papers of its former student and First World War poet Siegfried Sassoon (1886-1967). Now, for the first time, Sassoon's journals are freely available online as part of the Cambridge Digital Library.

Amidst the daily minutiae of life in the trenches, Sassoon recorded:

  • the first day of the Somme, 'a sunlit picture of Hell,' on July 1916
  • the Battle of Arras, during which he was 'fully expecting to get killed,' but was instead shot in the shoulder by a sniper, causing a dramatic deterioration in his handwriting from 15 - 16 April 1917
  • draft and fair copies of his 'Soldier's Declaration' against the conduct of the war, written and issued in June-July 1917
  • an early version of his poem 'The Dug-Out,' with an additional, excised verse, written in July 1918 and published in Picture-Show (1919)

The Siegfried Sasoon diaries had previously been edited by Rupert Hart-Davies and published in the 1980s.  So how does seeing the original manuscript versions change our perceptions of Sassoon's life and poetry? Does seeing the mud and candlewax on their pages add to a historian's understanding of Sassoon's experience in the trenches? How useful is either textual criticism (the effort to establish a text as nearly as possible to its original form) or genetic criticism (the effort to trace and understand the process of writing a text) to a literary scholar?

You can read Sassoon's poetry and browse related primary documents in the University of Oxford's First World War Poetry Digital Archive Sassoon Collection.

Posted: 31 July 2014

On interviews

Woman reading

One of the things that interviewers look for is genuine interest. Image credit: THX0477

We interview most people who apply to Cambridge (more than 80%). It is in interviews that subject specialists are able to work with you directly, see how you think and work, and really explore your academic potential for the course that you've applied for.

We hope that you will find the following new Cambridge University film useful, and we particularly hope that it will put any summer work that you are doing to develop your interests into context!

Posted: 27 July 2014

Sutton Hoo and the British Museum

Sutton Hoo Helm

The Sutton Hoo helmet at the British Museum. Image credit: Rob Roy

If you would like to explore Anglo-Saxon history and archaeology, you might enjoy visiting the sixth and early seventh century burial mounds and the Exhibition Hall at Sutton Hoo in Suffolk, or the Sutton Hoo and Europe AD300 - 1100 collection at the British Museum in London.

Posted: 25 July 2014

Navigation at sea in the eighteenth century

Navigation at sea was a real problem in the eighteenth century. Although ships could work out their latitude from the position of the sun, it was difficult to know how far east or west they were. In 1714 a Longitude Act was passed, offering rewards of up to £20,000 for anyone who could solve the problem of finding longitude at sea.

The National Maritime Museum and Cambridge University have put the archives relating to this period of exploration and invention online - do watch the film and explore the website. If you live near enough to visit Greenwich, you may enjoy one of the Longitude Season events.

Posted: 23 July 2014

Edgar Jones Philosophy Essay Competition (Year 12)

Middlesbrough Library

Middlesbrough Central Library. Image credit: summonedbyfells (cropped)

If you have just finished Year 12 and are looking for some Philosophy questions to get your teeth into during the summer, you may be interested in the 2014 Edgar Jones Philosophy Essay Competition which is being held by St Peter's College, Oxford.

You are asked to choose one of the following two questions:

  1. Does the fact that our senses can deceive mean that we can have no perceptual knowledge?
  2. Could you be a bad person and yet do the right thing all the time?

The closing date for submissions is 12 September 2014, there's a word limit of 2000 words, and you will notice that the judges are looking for clarity of thought and expression and cogency in your arguments in particular. Do read the full details on the St Peter's College website before you start your research!

Posted: 21 July 2014

The Virtual Chopin

Chopin statue in Manchester

The Chopin statue in Deansgate, Manchester. Image credit: Mike Kniec (cropped)

Have you come across any music by Fryderyk Chopin that you can think of? He was a nineteenth century composer and is the subject of The Virtual Chopin presented by Professor John Rink from Cambridge University Faculty of Music.

Further exploration:

Posted: 20 July 2014

RIBA Stirling Prize 2014 Shortlist

The London Shard from Tower BridgeThe Shard from Tower Bridge. Credit: Loco Steve

The Shard: do you love it or hate it? The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) have nominated the controversial London skyscraper for its Stirling Prize 2014. The Prize is awarded annually to the best building in the UK by RIBA chartered architects and International Fellows, or in the rest of the EU by a RIBA chartered architect.

The full shortlist is:

The debate about the worthiness of the contenders, the injustice of the omissions, and the rightfulness of the eventual winner has begun. Join in the debate on Building Design Online.

RIBA offers extensive information and guidance on becoming an architect and runs regular educational activities. Get involved!

Posted: 17 July 2014

Trinity College's Robson History Prize (Year 12)

Sea

What is to be gained by studying the histories of seas or oceans?
Image credit: AvidlyAbide

If you are interested in History (including historical aspects of a wide range of courses from Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic to Economics, Philosophy and Theology) why not think about some of the questions that Trinity College has set for their Robson History Prize? There's a wide choice of 59 titles, so you are bound to find a topic that you would enjoy studying.

Here are just a few of them:

  • What was the role and influence of Queens in Anglo-Saxon England?
  • Was the Hundred Years War really a single conflict?
  • What were the causes of the European ‘witchcraze’ in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries?
  • What sort of a revolution was the French revolution?
  • How did the Atlantic slave trade affect state formation and economic growth in West Africa?
  • Why was the Spanish civil war so bloody?
  • ‘The Attlee government’s failure to create a socialist commonwealth was as much due to ideological shortcomings as economic constraints.’ Discuss.
  • To what extent do market forces pose a threat to the accuracy of popular history?
  • Is the goal of Aristotle’s Politics to arrive at a theory of the best state?

If you would like to work on an essay to enter in the competition, the deadline is 1 August and do make sure that you read the full details (including the full list of titles) on Trinity College's website before you start. If you don't have chance or don't want to do that, do have a look at the titles nonetheless as there's plenty of inspiration for research and thought.

Posted: 16 July 2014

Summer Reading (and Writing)

Pile of booksCredit: Pam loves pie

As you break up for the vacation, you may be resolving to read through the pile of books that has built up on your bedside table during a busy academic year. But how do you make your summer reading count? As the University of Cambridge advises its students:

Reading for a degree requires different reading skills to reading for pleasure. Developing understanding through reading needs to be an active process, whereby you engage with the text, question and develop your ideas in response to it.

Listen to Hanna Weibye (one of the King's Fellows in History) making a similar point, when she recommends that you read as widely and as critically as possible.

 

The University of Southampton, the University of Manchester, and the Open University all offer useful advice on how to read in an engaged way.

One way to read effectively is to... write! Once you've read a text, why not write and share a review of it? The Wellcome Trust blog offers advice on how to write a news story from a scientific paper.  The Guardian's Blogging Students advise on how to blog.

Posted: 15 July 2014

BBC Radio 3 resources

Violin

Credit: Jason Hollinger

If you are interested in studying Music, we advise you to get to know as much music as possible, including musical repertoires other than those related to your principal instrument(s). Have you explored the BBC Radio 3 resources? These include:

Posted: 2 July 2014

Cambridge Architecture: exhibition of student work (11-16 July in London)

Preparation for the exhibition

Preparation in Cambridge for a previous ArcSoc exhibition

ArcSoc, the Cambridge University Architecture Society, invites you to attend its summer show:

  • Dates: Friday 11 to Wednesday 16 July 2014
  • Location: Testbed 1, 33 Parkgate Road, London, SW11 4NP
  • Opening times: 10am-6pm
  • Website: ArcSoc

This annual exhibition is entirely planned, built and curated by students. It's a great opportunity to get an insight into the Architecture Department and the work of students from first year to fifth year.

Free public lectures and a day for prospective students are also planned - see the ArcSoc website.

Posted: 1 July 2014

Precision: the Measure of All Things

Big Ben

Big Ben: accurate to one second an hour, but today we can build clocks that loose one second in 138 million years. Credit: Taz Wake

There was an interesting TV documentary last night telling the history of the science of measurement.

Throughout our history, developments in our ability to measure the world around us have changed our lives. In the documentary, Prof. Marcus du Sautoy explores how seconds and metres came to be as two of the most fundamental units of measure, how distance and time are linked, and the quest for ever greater precision in science.

Catch it on BBC iplayer:

Further documentaries in the same series will be on in the next couple of weeks:

Posted: 26 June 2014

Architecture - Exploring spaces

The Shed (temporary auditorium)

The Shed by Haworth Tompkins - an example of pop up architecture. Image credit: David Holt

What catches your eye? If you're thinking of studying Architecture at university, the summer is a great time to practice your drawing skills, to have a go at capturing your interests with a camera, and to think about the spaces and effects that you notice around you through explorative work in a range of media.

You can do this very well on your own, following your interests. You might like to read the information about portfolios if you would like some advice about work that you can later use in an application to Cambridge, and there are also some examples of application portfolios available - see Portfolio 1 and Portfolio 2.

If you are looking for events to attend, as well as any websites about what is on in your local area, RIBA (The Royal Institute of British Architects) has a good What's On? page for events up and down the UK, or you can look up events all over the world on the e-architect website

Posted: 22 June 2014

Last chance to book for Cambridge Law Open Day!

Inside the Law Faculty

The Law Faculty reception area

If you'd like to book a place on a Cambridge Law Faculty Open morning or afternoon on Wednesday 2 July, do send your booking form as soon as possible. The deadline for the faculty to receive your form is Wednesday 25 June (you need to post or email the information).

Posted: 21 June 2014

The 2014 Cambridge Open Days Programme is published!

Cambridge Open Days programme cover

The large Cambridge Open Days are on Thurs 3 and Fri 4 July. This event is for students who are considering an application in September/October 2014.

Do explore the 2014 Cambridge Open Days programme for details of course presentations and sample lectures in your subject, College opening times and locations. If you are interested in visiting a particular College, their website will normally have more detail. At King's, we're open from 9 until 5.30pm as part of the Cambridge Open Days, and we invite you to join tours of the College, subject meetings (students only for those) and chat with current students and admissions staff. See the details for Thurs 3 July and for Fri 4 July.

Booking is required. Although there are no general places left for the Cambridge Open Days, there are still plenty of places available for students who book to attend a College Open Day (you will also be able to attend Cambridge Open Day events in the afternoon) or a North East Welcome Event (please email us for details if you're from the North East). Please see the information about how to attend the Cambridge Open Days now that registration has closed.

We hope to see you there! If you can't attend, don't worry though, as the information that you need to make a successful application is also available online, and you are welcome to email us with any questions.

Posted: 18 June 2014

Gender in Japanese Studies - Free book for your school library?

A book of undergraduate dissertations was published last year, exploring emerging and divergent gender issues in Japan. It is called Manga Girl Seeks Herbivore Boy: Studying Japanese Gender at Cambridge, and it offers some fascinating insights into modern Japanese culture and society, as well as a great way to get a flavour of the kinds of material that you could study if you choose Japanese in the Asian and Middle Eastern Studies course (even if you've never studied Japanese before!). To find out more about the book, read the news article.

In order to introduce Japanese Studies, the department is offering a free copy to 50 school libraries. Why not ask your school librarian to click here for further information and the request form!

Posted: 12 June 2014

Slavery: Past and Present

Anti-Slavery Graffiti by Paul Don Smith

Street art by Paul Don Smith. Credit: MsSaraKelly

The Queen's Speech last week included the announcement of a Modern Slavery Bill, which promises to strengthen the prosecution of  human traffickers and improve the protection of victims.

The University of Hull's Wilberforce Institute for the study of Slavery and Emancipation hosts research into both historical forms of slavery and contemporary forms of enslavement. You can watch Prof. Catherine Hall (UCL) deliver the Institute's Annual Alderman Sydney Smith Lecture on 'Re-thinking the Legacies of Slavery.'

Hull Museums have extensive collections celebrating the work of local son and anti-slavery campaigner William Wilberforce (1759 - 1833). You can visit Wilberforce House Museum to see the collections for yourself.

Liverpool is home to the International Slavery Museum.

M Shed in Bristol reflects on the city's role in the slave trade. You can visit the museum, or browse its Transatlantic Slave Trade collection online.

The University of Cambridge offers some resources for the study of slavery here.

Anti-Slavery Day is on Saturday 18 October this year. How will you mark it?

Posted: 11 June 2014

Free Taster Day in Latin and Classics - Saturday 21 June

Credit: Giovanni

If you're considering an application for Classics at Cambridge and you've never studied Latin at school or college, we invite you to book a place on a free taster day in Cambridge on Saturday 21 June. Fifty travel bursaries of up to £50.00 are available on a first come, first served basis.

Please see the Classics Faculty website and further information for details of the event and how to book your place.

Posted: 10 June 2014

Fantasy GCSE Set Texts

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Credit: tonynetone

What set texts did you read for your GCSE English Literature?

In the Guardian this weekend, authors chose the set texts they would like GCSE students to read.  Cambridge Classicist Mary Beard took the opportunity to 'bring in the classical world by the back door, via some great works of English literature.' She set William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar (1599); Robert Graves, I Claudius (1934); Chrisopher Logue, War Music (1959 - 2011); and Carol Ann Duffy, The World's Wife (1999).

  • Which texts would you set GCSE students?
  • In making your choice, what is the most important consideration?  Introducing students to classic works, or engaging their interests?  Representing a range of literary genres and periods, or promoting particular approaches and topics?  Capturing the national heritage, or celebrating cultural diversity?

Posted: 9 June 2014

Subject Conferences at the University of York

Booking is open for Year 12 subject conferences at the University of York, offering an insight into degree-level study in specific subjects.

  • 27 June - Philosophy Conference
  • 11 July - Chemistry Conference

See the York University website for details and booking.

Posted: 5 June 2014