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Digital.Bodleian

Old Schools Quadrangle, Bodleian Library, OxfordOld Schools Quad, Bodleian Library, Oxford. Image credit: Mikael Korhonen

The Bodleian Library at the University of Oxford currently holds 11,746,808 printed items, 25,314 miles of archives and manuscripts, and 1,250,000 maps. The newly launched Digital.Bodleian aims to open some of this extraordinary collection to users from around the world for learning, teaching, and research.

You can now browse...

... among many other collections.

The Cambridge University Library has its own Cambridge Digital Library. Most recently, a first selection of items from the Royal Commonwealth Society Library and the entire Lewis-Gibson collection of medieval Jewish manuscripts has been added to the online collection.

Date posted: 

Tuesday 11 August 2015

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FutureLearn

Basic Science: understanding numbers from the Open University is a four week course beginning on 6 July. The course explains how you can use numbers to describe the natural world and make sense of everything from atoms to oceans.

Here's an opportunity to explore and develop your academic interests this Summer, whatever your subject, wherever you live.

FutureLearn offers free online courses, developed by leading universities and cultural institutions. For example, beginning next week (29 June) you could explore Literature of the English Country House with the University of Sheffield, or deploy Real World Calculus with the University of Sheffield.

Date posted: 

Tuesday 23 June 2015

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#CambTweet Q&A: Saturday 21 March

Twitter iconTwitter. Image credit: Jurgen Appelo

A message from Cambridge University Student Union (CUSU) to all prospective students:

Interested in a quick, easy way to find out what life is really like as a student at the universities of Oxford or Cambridge? Here's one that won't even involve you leaving your computer - it's on Twitter! #CambTweet and #OxTweet are student-run Twitter-based schemes: student volunteers tweet daily about their lives at the universities - everything from what and how they’re studying to getting involved with clubs/societies and hanging out with friends. This Saturday (21 March) from 9-10pm, we are running a joint online Question and Answer session: many of our volunteers will be online especially to answer your questions about becoming and being a university student, so if something is on your mind that you want answered, tweet us with it!

CUSU also publish an Alternative Prospectus.

Date posted: 

Tuesday 17 March 2015

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Trinity College Residentials for UK Sixth Formers in Cambridge

Fountain, Great Court, Trinity College, CambridgeFountain in the Great Court, Trinity College, Cambridge. Image credit: Matthias Rosenkranz

Trinity College, Cambridge is offering subject-specific residential visits in the Easter and Summer vacations. They are completely free, including accommodation and all meals, and they are open to applications from all students at UK schools who will be at least 16 by the first day of the residential.

Booking has now opened for the Humanities Residential which will take place during the Easter vacation from Tuesday 7 to Thursday 9 April.

Applications will be opening soon for the following residentials which will take place during the Summer vacation:

  • Science Residential: Thursday 25 to Saturday 27 June
  • Law Residential: Tuesday 30 June to Wednesday 1 July
  • Music Residential: Thursday 9 to Saturday 11 of July
  • Language-based Humanities Residential: Monday 24 – Tuesday 25 August

Keep checking the Access at Trinity website for updates.

Date posted: 

Monday 23 February 2015

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What's the Big Idea?

Neighbours? Image credit: Julia McDermott

The Big Idea is a monthly podcast, in which a group of academics is brought together from across the University of Edinburgh to debate topical issues and showcase their research. Recent editions have focused on the Scottish referendum on independence, our relationship with technology, and women's role and participation in society. As you listen, ask yourself how each academic makes connections between their own work, their colleagues' work, and current affairs. Try linking your work in any subject to your work in another subject and / or the news.

Date posted: 

Tuesday 17 February 2015

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What's on? Public lectures at a university near you

Image credit: Marijn de Vries Hoogerwe

Universities share their latest research in public lectures, open to all, free of charge:

If you can't make it on the day, universities very often publish videos or transcripts of their public lectures on their websites after the event. For example, browse the latest uploads to the University of Cambridge's Video and Audio Service.

Date posted: 

Saturday 7 February 2015

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Year 12 UNIQ Summer Schools at Oxford University

Radcliffe Camera, University of OxfordRadcliffe Camera, University of Oxford. Image credit: Jónatas Luzia

How will you be spending your Summer vacation?

UNIQ is a programme of free summer schools at the University of Oxford. UNIQ is open to students studying in their first year of further education and who are based at UK state schools/colleges. Choose from a wide range of courses and spend a week attending lectures and seminars in Oxford in July or August. Applications close on 12 February, so get going now!

See also the Year 12 Sutton Trust Summer Schools for a similar opportunity in Cambridge. Sutton Trust Summer Schools also run at other top UK universities.

Date posted: 

Monday 2 February 2015

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Oxford Pathways: Year 12 Study Days on 17, 18, 19 March

Sheldonian Theatre, University of OxfordSheldonian Theatre, University of Oxford. Image credit: Julie Anne Johnson

The Oxford Pathways Programme is now taking bookings for its Year 12 Study Days on 17, 18 and 19 March. Subjects on offer range from Biomedical Sciences to Earth Sciences, History to Economics and Management, and Classics to German. The Study Days are open to Year 12 students, at non-selective state schools or colleges in the UK, who have the potential to make a competitive application to Oxford University. See a sample timetable and book online. There is some accommodation available, free of charge, for those who are travelling furthest: make your request on the booking form. Applications close this Friday 30 January, so act swiftly!

Date posted: 

Monday 26 January 2015

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The Cycle of Terms

'Parking problems': bicycles pile up outside King's. Credit: Phil Shirley

Full term began for our current Cambridge students last Thursday.  To celebrate the new academic year,  join them in their morning pedal to lectures by watching this video.

A number of our current students write about a typical day during termtime in their King's Student Perspectives.

All the best for the new academic year to everyone!

Date posted: 

Monday 13 October 2014

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The X Factor: Multidisciplinary (and Interdisciplinary) Approaches to Classics

Image credit: Ingo Gildenhard

At the recent Classics Faculty Sixth Form Study Days, King's Classicist Ingo Gildenhard explained how multidisciplinary approaches to Classics underpins teaching and learning at Cambridge.

The Classics Faculty is divided into caucuses, each of which brings a different approach to the study of Classics: Caucus A (Literature); Caucus B (Philosophy); Caucus C (History); Caucus D (Art and Archaeology) and Caucus E (Linguistics).

Dr. Gildenhard gave an example of how his colleagues in different caucuses each brought a different approach to the study of Ovid's Ars Amatoria [The Art of Love] in a recent lecture series:

  • A: Poetics, or: The (S)expert at Work
  • B: Sexual Ethics [gender relations, feminist readings]
  • C: The Empire Strikes Back [Ovid and Augustus, the politics of the Ars, Ovid’s banishment to the Black Sea]
  • D: Sex and the City [Ovid and the monuments, his rewriting of Rome’s urban topography]
  • E: The Language of Love (and Sex) [how can we understand the different range of meanings of Latin words to English dictionary equivalents - does raptor mean ‘rapist’ or ‘seducer’? and how does it relate to rapina and rapio?]

The students and academics gain enormously from exploring these multidisciplinary perspectives.  If and when they combine two or more approaches to address a particular topic, thereby transcending any one discipline, their work becomes interdisciplinary.

For this reason, King's Classicist John Henderson and his colleague Geoffrey Lloyd pioneered an X Caucus (Interdisciplinary) in the 1980s, to allow and encourage Cambridge students and academics to cross disciplines in their study of the Classics.

Multidisciplinarity is not restricted to Classics! You will be able to find multidisciplinary (and interdisciplinary) approaches to almost any topic. Have you got the X Factor? Think of a topic that has caught your attention in one of your A Level subjects and ask yourself what your knowledge and skills in your other A Level subjects can bring to it.

 

Date posted: 

Thursday 9 October 2014

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