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Shakespeare - Where to start?

shakespeare first folio

Shakespeare's First Folio. Credit: ptwo

All students studying English at Cambridge take a paper (a module) on Shakespeare in their first or second year, but it can be daunting deciding where to begin with 38 plays and over a hundred poems to be getting on with!

You might like to start by looking back at what you’ve already covered. Many students have studied at least one of Shakespeare’s Tragedies at school (Macbeth, King Lear or Hamlet might be familiar?) or one the Comedies (Much Ado about Nothing or Twelfth Night?). You may even have approached a play that fits more problematically into both of or between these categories, such as The Tempest or The Merchant of Venice.

But have you ever read, or seen performed, one of the History plays? Or read some of Shakespeare's sonnets? Reading or watching one the poems or plays you've never come across before can be a good (and fun!) place to start. You can find all of Shakespeare's works online on Open Source Shakespeare or Shakespeare Online.

And then, why not check out Radio Four’s programme on Shakespeare and Literary Criticism?

Date posted: 

Thursday 11 August 2016

Tags: 

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Want to visit Cambridge during the summer?

King's

Prospective students are always welcome to visit

Remember that you are welcome to visit any time, even if there's not an official open day on.

  • If you would like to look around a college, it is best to introduce yourself at the porters' lodge (the reception). Porters are normally happy for prospective students to walk around the public areas and will give you any maps / information available. There's also a map of Cambridge, which shows where the colleges are. You'll see that the middle of Cambridge is quite small, so you will be able to walk between most colleges easily.
  • If you would like to visit King's, do introduce yourself at the porters' lodge when you arrive. The college will be open to prospective students and we have a self-guided tour that you can use.
  • You may like to visit on a day when we're running an informal meeting for prospective students. Do email us with your name and the subject you are interested in if you would like to book a place one one of these meetings.
  • There are some great museums and teaching collections which you might like to explore, most of which are free to visit. Or you might like to check the 'what's on' list for the day you are visiting - there are often talks and exhibitions on, as well as the Shakespeare Festival.

Date posted: 

Wednesday 20 July 2016

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Engineering Open Day Talks

engineering open day

A previous Engineering Open Day. Credit: Engineering at Cambridge

Thinking about Engineering, but didn't manage to make it to an Open Day? The Department of Engineering have uploaded videos of their open day talks online, as well as handouts of the slideshows.

You can find out about upcoming Engineering Open Days here or find out more about Engineering at King's on our subject page.

Date posted: 

Monday 18 July 2016

Tags: 

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Examples of historical writing

Student in Chetwynd Court

Reading in Chetwynd Court

Are you interested in applying for one of the History degrees this October? Remember that the application process is not only about grades! We will be looking for students who have developed their interests in History and have the potential to succeed in this subject at Cambridge.

There is no set reading for History, History and Politics or History and Modern Languages. You may have already found material that you are enjoying, however if you are not sure what to read (where to start?) and are looking for some specific History material to look at over the summer, we hope that these examples of historical writing will be useful.

Date posted: 

Monday 27 June 2016

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How is Britain Changing?

london central

Credit: Pedro Szekely

The competition for the Young Geographer of the Year Award provides students with the opportunity to explore geographical change from many different perspectives, at both local and national scales.

To enter, sixth form students must produce a 1500 word essay. Entries which illustrate how students have collected and used data from a variety of sources, including the collection of first-hand data through fieldwork, are encouraged. You can find full information, including details for how younger students can enter, on the entry form.

The deadline for all entries is 9:00 Friday 14 October 2016.

Date posted: 

Wednesday 15 June 2016

Tags: 

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