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Robert Walker Prize for Essays in Law 2017

Law books

Find out about Cambridge Law on the course website.

Students interested in applying for Law have a great opportunity coming up to engage with their subject beyond what they are doing at their school at the moment.

Trinity College has launched the Robert Walker Prize for Essays in Law in 2013. The prize is named after an Honorary Fellow of the College, Lord Walker of Gestingthorpe, a retired Justice of the Supreme Court and former law student at Trinity.

The Robert Walker Prize has three objectives:

  •     to encourage students with an interest in Law to explore that interest by researching, considering and developing an argument about a legal topic of importance to modern society
  •     to encourage those interested in Law to apply for a university course in Law; and
  •     to recognise the achievements of high-calibre students, from whatever background they may come.

The topic for this year’s competition will be announced on Monday 6 February 2017 and the deadline for submission is Monday 24 April 2017.

The full list details of the competition are available on the Trinity College website.

Good luck to those who enter the competition!

Date posted: 

Tuesday 31 January 2017

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Vellacott History Essay Prize 2017

Peterhouse is setting some interesting questions for Year 12  students to discuss (with reference to any academic discipline or area of interest) for its annual Vellacott Essay Prize.

Students are asked to choose a topic that you have not previously studied at school from the long list of questions, which include a wide range of historical topics, also touching on a number of other subject areas, such as Classics, Theology, Art, Literature, Music, Politics, Architecture and Sociology. Here are some examples of the questions set:

  • Is race a modern concept?
  • What were the political consequences of the Black Death?
  • Why did early modern people accuse their neighbours of being witches?
  • Why were there so many new inventions in the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries?
  • Was there a 'crisis of masculinity' in the late Victorian period?
  • 'Probably there are countries where you can predict a man's opinions from his income, but it is never quite safe to do so in England'. Do you agree with George Orwell?

The full list of questions and details of the competition are available on the Peterhouse website in the Vellacott Prize information pdf, and please also read the details of eligibility and the history of the Peterhouse essay prizes. The deadline is 17 March 2017 .Good luck to those who choose to explore some of these topics, whether just for curiosity or to develop an essay and enter the competition!

Date posted: 

Friday 27 January 2017

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Sutton Trust Summer Schools (Year 12)

Bodley's Court lawn

Would you like to explore your subject interest in deepth? Then the Year 12 Sutton Trust Summer Schools might be just the thing for you.

The Cambridge Sutton Trust Summer Schools are week-long, subject-specific residentials, where you live and study as a Cambridge student. You’ll stay in your own private student room within a Cambridge College, eat with other Summer School students in the canteens and socialise in the common rooms.

During the day, you’ll be in your academic department, where you’ll be taught by world-leading experts in your subject. They’ll guide you through new areas of study, introducing you to the depth and breadth of a Cambridge undergraduate course.

The programme includes a wide variety of courses in Arts, Humanities, Social Sciences, Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics and applications are open 9 January 2017 to 2 March 2017! For more information please see Sutton Trust Summer Schools

 

Date posted: 

Friday 13 January 2017

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Year 11 Summer School for Arts and Humanities

Ancient columns and a pool

The outdoor dining room at Hadrian's Villa in Tivoli

For students interested in the Arts and Humanities and especially Italy, Selwyn College has organised a Summer School this year from Friday 30th June – Sunday 2nd July. The Summer School will feature a range of different Arts and Humanities subjects, themed around Italy. Participants will travel (virtually) through the Italian peninsula with University of Cambridge scholars as their guides as they experience taster lectures in Languages, History, Art History, Archaeology, Anthropology, Film and Linguistics. More information about the Summer School and how to sign up can be found at Selwyn College.

And while you are waiting for the Summer School in June, why not read some of our student perspectives for Classics, MML or History in the meantime, to get an idea of which subjects you could study at University.

Date posted: 

Tuesday 10 January 2017

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Book recommendation for Geography

Pile of booksCredit: Pam loves pie

Got some time to read over the holidays? Matthew Gandy, the Director of Studies in Geography, recommends the following book for prospective students:

Andrea Wulf,
The invention of Nature: The Adventures of Alexander von Humboldt, the Lost Hero of Science
(Hodder & Stoughton, 2016)

In this prize-winning new biography Andrea Wulf describes the life and ideas of Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859) who is widely regarded as the founder of modern geography. Humboldt was a decisive influence on Darwin and is also credited as a pioneer of ecological thought.

There's a film clip about the book on Andrea Wulf's website.

For more ideas, see the Geography reading suggestions.

Date posted: 

Thursday 22 December 2016

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Some reading in French!

Book cover

Credit: Chris Drumm

Here's the beginning of Germinal a novel by Emile Zola:

Dans la plaine rase, sous la nuit sans étoiles, d'une obscurité et d'une épaisseur d'encre, un homme suivait seul la grande route de Marchiennes à Montsou, dix kilomètres de pavé coupant tout droit, à travers les champs de betteraves. Devant lui, il ne voyait même pas le sol noir, et il n'avait la sensation de l'immense horizon plat que par les souffles du vent de mars, des rafales larges comme sur une mer, glacées d'avoir balayé des lieues de marais et de terres nues. Aucune ombre d'arbre ne tachait le ciel, le pavé se déroulait avec la rectitude d'une jetée, au milieu de l'embrun aveuglant des ténèbres.

L'homme était parti de Marchiennes vers deux heures. Il marchait d'un pas allongé, grelottant sous le coton aminci de sa veste et de son pantalon de velours. Un petit paquet, noué dans un mouchoir à carreaux, le gênait beaucoup; et il le serrait contre ses flancs, tantôt d'un coude, tantôt de l'autre, pour glisser au fond de ses poches les deux mains à la fois, des mains gourdes que les lanières du vent d'est faisaient saigner. Une seule idée occupait sa tête vide d'ouvrier sans travail et sans gîte, l'espoir que le froid serait moins vif après le lever du jour. Depuis une heure, il avançait ainsi, lorsque sur la gauche, à deux kilomètres de Montsou, il aperçut des feux rouges, trois brasiers brûlant au plein air, et comme suspendus. D'abord, il hésita, pris de crainte; puis, il ne put résister au besoin douloureux de se chauffer un instant les mains.

A level plain, on a starless night, with a lone man walking along a straight road. This is how Zola begins Germinal. First the plain, then the darkness, then the man, and finally the plain again.In this novel, as in the others of the Rougon Macquart series, Zola devotes considerable attention to descrption, which he calls in Le roman expérimentale "un état du monde extérieur qui détermine et complète l'homme."
J.H. Matthews, 'The Art of Description in Zola's Germinal', Symposium: A Quarterly Journal in Modern Literatures Vol. 16 , Iss. 4.

Date posted: 

Thursday 15 September 2016

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Pairing socks

Here is a problem from i-want-to-study-engineering.org, the website written by Cambridge University Engineering department that helps you to apply for Engineering courses at top universities.

Jane has 5 pairs of socks. The first pair of socks are both red. The second pair of socks are both blue. The third pair of socks are both green. The fourth pair of socks are both yellow. The fifth pair of socks are both white. One sock from each pair is placed in a bag on the left, and the rest are put in a bag on the right.

In each turn, Jane draws one sock at random from each bag and folds them together to form a pair. After five turns, she has formed 5 pairs of socks. Find the probability that no pair consists of socks of the same colour.

See the hints and choose your answer!

Date posted: 

Saturday 10 September 2016

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Public Law for everyone

Polling station sign

Credit: Ungry Young Man

Public Law for everyone is a blog by Prof. Mark Elliott. It is aimed at general readers, with the intention of explaining the real-world implications of public law, posts for students who are grappling with the subject, and more specialised posts that reflect Mark's research interests and projects.

Mark is Professor of Public Law in the Law department here at Cambridge, and he is also a Legal Adviser to the House of Lords Select Committee on the Constitution.

See Public Law for everyone

Date posted: 

Wednesday 7 September 2016

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