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Antarctic glaciers

Antarctic peninsula

The Northern Antarctic Peninsula. Credit: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

AntarcticGlaciers.org is a very useful and interesting website on the the science of Antarctic glaciology written by Dr Bethan Davies from Royal Holloway, University of London. Here is the introduction:

Antarctic glaciers are beautiful and awe-inspiring. They affect us through their connections with the ocean and sea level, and environmental change is having rapid consequences in Antarctica. Antarctica is the world’s largest ice sheet, covering ~14,000,000 km2. Much of the ice sheet surface lies above 3000 m above sea level. This massive thickness of ice drowns whole mountain ranges, and numerous volcanoes exist underneath the icey exterior. It’s the world’s fifth largest continent, and it is, on average, the highest and coldest continent. Antarctica also provides a unique record of the Earth’s past climate, through the geomorphological record of glacier moraines, through ice cores, through deep sea sediment cores, and through past records of sea level rise.

If you would like to find out more about this fascinating topic, do explore the AntarcticGlaciers.org website, which includes information about different types of glacier, ice shelves, and ice streams as well as the section on glaciers and climate. There is a lot of material that you'll enjoy browsing, and if you are taking A level Geography, this section helps you to find the relevant material for different parts of your course. You can also ask questions here.

Date posted: 

Thursday 12 February 2015

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Legal History: 1215 and all that

Magna Carta, 1215Magna Carta, 1215. Image credit: anselor

To no one will we sell, to no one deny or delay right or justice. - See more at: http://www.bl.uk/magna-carta/articles/magna-carta-english-translation#st...
To no one will we sell, to no one deny or delay right or justice. - See more at: http://www.bl.uk/magna-carta/articles/magna-carta-english-translation#st...
To no one will we sell, to no one deny or delay right or justice. - See more at: http://www.bl.uk/magna-carta/articles/magna-carta-english-translation#st...

"To no one will we sell, to no one deny, or delay right or justice."

This week, the British Library marked the 800th anniversary of the Magna Carta by bringing together the four remaining original documents for the first time. Radio 4's Law in Action recorded a special programme at the exhibition. Presenter Joshua Rosenberg asked a former Lord Chief Justice, a current lawyer, and the Head of Mediaeval Manuscripts at the British Library:

  • how much of our current law actually comes from the Magna Carta?
  • how much of its legacy is little more than myth?
  • to what extent are the protections attributed to Magna Carta under threat?

How can legal history enrich our knowledge and understanding of the law? Roman Law has been taught at Cambridge for over seven hundred years. Indeed, Civil (Roman) Law I is a compulsory paper for all our first years. Dr. Matthew Dyson explains why it remains important and offers a sample supervision sheet. Second and third years can choose to take a further paper in legal history.

Date posted: 

Friday 6 February 2015

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Law Essay Competition

Trinity College has an annual Robert Walker essay competition open to students in Year 12 or Year 13  (the final two years of school).

The title set for this year's competition is:

"Should people be able to sell their bodily organs (e.g., their kidney(s) or liver)?"

If working on this question appeals to you, do ensure that you read the competition details on the Trinity College website. The deadline for entries is Monday 20 April 2015.

Essay competitions can be a good opportunity to get your teeth into an interesting and relevant question and to develop your research and argument skills. You will see in the competition details that the assessors will be looking at a range of factors, including how well your argument is sustained, the quality of your language, and how well you have used appropriate supporting material and facts in evidence for your arguments. Of course, these are questions it is worth asking yourself about all of your written work, whether for a competition or not!

Date posted: 

Saturday 31 January 2015

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Holocaust Memorial Day 2015: Keeping the Memory Alive

Today is Holocaust Memorial Day, which remembers the victims of genocide across time and countries. 27 January marks the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau, the largest of the Nazi death camps. 2015 is especially significant, since it is the 70th anniversary since the liberation of Auschwitz and the 20th anniversary of the genocide in Srebenica, Bosnia. This year's theme, Keeping the Memory Alive, asks us to reflect on the relationship between history and memory: how does one alter the other? What does it mean to memorialise the past and how shall we do it?

January marks the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau, the largest Nazi death camp - See more at: http://hmd.org.uk/page/why-mark-27-january-holocaust-memorial-day#sthash...
January marks the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau, the largest Nazi death camp - See more at: http://hmd.org.uk/page/why-mark-27-january-holocaust-memorial-day#sthash...

The Holocaust Memorial Day Trust defines genocide and documents and commemorates the following cases:

Young Hartlepudlians will be Keeping the Memory Alive with a memorial at Avenue Ballroom in Lauder Street from 6.30pm to 8.30pm on Tuesday 27 January. The event is free and open to all, but booking is required, so please contact Beth Storey on 01429 523900.

The Holocaust Memorial Day Trust's Youth Champion Programme allows you to further research and reflect on the Holocaust and subsequent genocides and supports you in organising an event of your own.

The Anne Frank Trust UK remembers the Holocaust, and challenges prejudice and reduces hatred today, by drawing on Anne Frank's life and diary. You can visit the Trust's History for Today exhibition in York Minster from 26 January to 1 February.

Date posted: 

Tuesday 27 January 2015

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BBC Taking Liberties Season

Houses of Parliament, WestminsterThe Houses of Parliament, Westminster. Image credit: Treye Rice

2015 marks the 800th anniversary of the Magna Carta. The BBC is leading commemorations with its Taking Liberties season of programmes on Britain's democracy: past, present, and future.

Ask yourself: are the democratic freedoms manifest in the Magna Carta or the de Montfort Parliament real or imagined, either then or now?

Date posted: 

Monday 26 January 2015

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Cambridge GCSE Computing Online

A raspberry piImage credit: Teardown Central

The OCR Exam Board, the Raspberry Pi Foundation, and Cambridge University Press offer a MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) based on the Cambridge GCSE Computing curriculum. The course is free, open to all, and offers an introduction to how computers work, how they are used, and develops computer programming and problem-solving skills. Whilst completion of the course does not lead to a GCSE qualification, you will receive a 'Statement of Participation' to record your achievement. Find out more on the Cambridge GCSE Computing Online website, beginning with their FAQs.

Date posted: 

Monday 26 January 2015

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Year 12 Science / Medicine Essay Competition

Moon

Credit: OliBac

  • How has astronomy benefited society?
  • Suppose you could create a new checmical element. What physical and chemical properties would you ascribe to it, and what uses could this element be put to?
  • If you could take one item, which must fit in your pocket, back to the year 1800 with the goal of advancing science or medicine, what would it be and what would you do with it?
  • Is it more important to save tropical forests or the world's oceans? Why?
  • How far is it to the moon?
  • "Free health care at the point of delivery trivialises the service." Discuss. 

These are the questions that Peterhouse College is asking Year 12 students to think about for this year's Kelvin Science Prize. If you are interested in researching and writing one of these essays, please read the information carefully on the Peterhouse College website (see especially the Kelvin Science Prize pdf here, which contains full details of the questions and how to enter). The deadline is 20 March 2015.

Date posted: 

Tuesday 9 December 2014

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History Virtual Classroom

Middlemarch

What role can a historical novel play in the study of History?
Credit: Martha Garvey

If you enjoy studying History and want to know more about what it is like at university level, make sure that you have a look at the History Faculty's virtual classroom:

Date posted: 

Friday 5 December 2014

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The French Revolution: Tearing up History

The death of marat

The death of Marat. Credit: paukrus (cropped)

There's an interesting documentary on BBC iplayer, which explores the history of the French Revoution through the story of its art.

The programme is presented by Dr Richard Clay, Senior Lecturer in History of Art at the University of Birmingham.

Date posted: 

Sunday 30 November 2014

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